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Archaeopress: Publishing Scholarly Archaeology since 1997
Communicating the research of thousands of archaeologists worldwide.

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in scholarly books and journals in the field of archaeology and related heritage subjects.

COVID-19: Archaeopress is functioning as usual thanks to the special efforts of our staff, printers and fulfilment partners. Our publishing schedule continues at its typical pace and print volumes can be ordered directly from Archaeopress or via our distributors Marston Book Services (UK/EU/ROW), and Casemate Academic (USA/CANADA). Please note shipping times may vary and take longer than in more normal times.
 
 
NEW: A Latin Lexicon: An Illustrated Compendium of Latin Words and English Derivatives by Caroline K. Mackenzie. Illustrations by Amanda Short. Hardback; 156x234mm; 142 pages; colour design throughout, 20 full-colour illustrations. 677 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697629. £24.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697636. £19.99 (Exc. VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A charming compendium of Latin words and English derivatives, encompassing over 365 words required for Latin GCSE, one for each day of the year. Each Latin entry is accompanied by key notes on grammar, translations and some playful and memorable derivatives. A concise introduction and a glossary of Latin in common usage combine to make this a vade-mecum (essential companion) for all learners of Latin as well as cruciverbalists. The text is imaginatively punctuated by 20 full-colour illustrations by Amanda Short.

About the Author
Caroline K. Mackenzie read classics at Pembroke College, Cambridge. After a legal career in London, she became Head of Classics at a school in Sevenoaks. In 2018 Caroline was awarded distinction in an MA in Classical Art and Archaeology at King’s College London. Caroline offers online private tutoring in Latin and Greek and runs online Classical reading groups for all ages and abilities. Caroline’s first book, Culture and Society at Lullingstone Roman Villa was published by Archaeopress in 2019.

Praise for This Volume:
Carpe verba! (Grasp the words!) A hugely fun and useful tool for Latin learners. I wish I’d had this book when I was learning Latin.’ – Caroline Lawrence, author of The Roman Mysteries. ;

‘The narrator of a recent French historical novel muses: 'My whole life I owe to Greek. If I hadn't known how to conjugate the aorist, where to put the stresses, how to recite -mi verbs, I would never have been able to escape my menial little existence. Declensions proved to be the instrument of my ascent'. Pari passu and mutatis mutandis, that surely is what every reader will say after reading, marking and inwardly digesting Caroline Mackenzie's brilliant Latin Compendium.’ – Professor Paul Cartledge, University of Cambridge. ;

‘A handsome and lively introduction to Latin through its core vocabulary and derivatives. Everyone should have a copy.’ – Dr Daisy Dunn, author of In the Shadow of Vesuvius. ;

‘This delightful, illustrated book will serve two purposes: the straightforward English derivatives will help students remember their Latin vocabulary, and the recondite ones will give a head start for the Scrabble board or cryptic crossword.’ – Dr John Taylor, author of Essential GCSE Latin. ;

‘Latin can be fun, who knew? A real must for anyone learning Latin or interested in language. I genuinely LOVE this book. It is a fantastic idea and looks absolutely beautiful.’ – Celia Rees, author and former English teacher. ;

‘Elegantly presented, entertaining, and educational.’ – Ruth Downie, author. ;

'The perfect book for anyone who, like me, wishes they had understood Latin at school. Why did our teachers tell us it is a "dead language", and not how useful it would be in real life?’ – Janie Hampton, author. ;

‘A thoroughly helpful volume, great for both reference and pleasure, ideal for both the crossword and the classroom.’ – Michelle Lovric, author.
NEW: Lost Worlds of Ancient and Modern Greece Gilbert Bagnani: The Adventures of a Young Italian Archaeologist in Greece, 1921-1924 by Ian Begg. Hardback; 380pp; 14 figures; 5 maps. 604 2020 Archaeological Lives . ISBN 9781789694529. £25.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

By day, young Gilbert Bagnani studied archaeology in Greece, but by night he socialised with the elite of Athenian society. Secretly writing for the Morning Post in London, he witnessed both antebellum Athens in 1921 and the catastrophic collapse of Christian civilisation in western Anatolia in 1922. While there have been many accounts by refugees of the disastrous flight from Smyrna, few have been written from the perspective of the west side of the Aegean. The flood of a million refugees to Greece brought in its wake a military coup in Athens, the exile of the Greek royal family and the execution or imprisonment of politicians, whom Gilbert knew.

Gilbert’s weekly letters to his mother in Rome reveal his Odyssey-like adventures on a voyage of discovery through the origins of western civilisation. As an archaeologist in Greece, he travelled through time seeing history repeat itself: Minoan Knossos, Byzantine Constantinople and Ottoman Smyrna were all violently destroyed, but the survivors escaped to the new worlds of Mycenaean Greece, Renaissance Venice and modern Greece.

At Smyrna in the twentieth century, history was written not only by the victors but was also recorded by the victims. At the same time, however, the twentieth century itself was so filled with reports of ethnic cleansings on such a scale that the reports brutalized the humanity of the supposedly civilized people reading about them, and the tragedy of Smyrna disappeared from public awareness between the cataclysmic upheavals of the First and Second World Wars.

About the Author
Ian Begg studied archaeology in Greece at the America School of Classical Studies in Athens. For this book, the author retraced Gilbert Bagnani's footsteps around Greece, the Aegean, Turkey and Libya. He has not only participated in excavations in Sicily, Greece, Crete and Egypt but also initiated a survey on the island of Karpathos especially for the chapter in this volume.

Reviews
Gilbert Bagnani, the subject of Ian Begg’s book, was unknown to me, and I am glad to have made his acquaintance. The book covers the period 1921-1924. Gilbert comes across as a fascinating character, who encountered the Levant at a critical time for both the Greece of Eleftherios Venizelos and the Turkey of Mustapha Kemal Atatürk. He was bilingual in Italian (from his father) and English (from his mother): an archaeologist but always more than that. He knew and was helped by the excellent William Miller, which led to his contributing incisive articles about the politics of Greece and the Levant to the Morning Post in London. As a member of the Italian School of Archaeology in Athens he travelled around Greece and the islands and found himself in Asia Minor at a critical phase of the Greek occupation and Kemal’s war of independence. All this and much more is described in Gilbert’s letters to his mother. His grasp of local and international politics was impressive. He and Begg paint sparkling pen pictures of personalities such as Bosdari, the Italian ambassador during the Great War, and later Governor of the Dodecanese, Prince Demidoff the Russian ambassador, Harold Lamb the British Consul at Smyrna and family, Greek personalities such as Stratos, Kalapothakis, Karapanos, and colleagues at the Italian School. Gilbert emerges as clever, sometimes arrogant, fascinated by people especially from high society, and with a weakness for royalty. Begg does him justice in a well sourced book. This is a lively account of a formidable personality, scholar and archaeologist in the making. The black and white photographs by Gilbert himself are excellent. – Sir Michael Llewellyn Smith, British Ambassodor to Greece 1996 – 1999 ;

Gilbert Bagnani, of Italian and Canadian extraction, arrived in Greece at the age of 21, already well-connected through his parents’ social and professional circles. He was ostensibly studying Greek A
NEW: Ages and Abilities: The Stages of Childhood and their Social Recognition in Prehistoric Europe and Beyond by Katharina Rebay-Salisbury and Doris Pany-Kucera. Paperback; 176x252mm; 264 pages; illustrated throughout. 681 2020 Childhood in the Past Monograph Series 9. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697681. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697698. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Ages and Abilities explores social responses to childhood stages from the late Neolithic to Classical Antiquity in Central Europe and the Mediterranean and includes cross-cultural comparison to expand the theoretical and methodological framework. By comparing osteological and archaeological evidence, as well as integrating images and texts, authors consider whether childhood age classes are archaeologically recognizable, at which approximated ages transitions took place, whether they are gradual or abrupt and different for girls and boys. Age transitions may be marked by celebrations and rituals; cultural accentuation of developmental stages may be reflected by inclusion or exclusion at cemeteries, by objects associated with childhood such as feeding vessels and toys, and gradual access to adult material culture. Access to tools, weapons and status symbols, as well as children’s agency, rank and social status, are recurrent themes. The volume accounts for the variability in how a range of chronologically and geographically diverse communities perceived children and childhood, and at the same time, discloses universal trends in child development in the (pre-)historic past.

About the Editors
Katharina Rebay-Salisbury is an archaeologist with a research focus on the European Bronze and Iron Ages. She directs the research group ‘Prehistoric Identities’ at the Institute for Oriental and European Archaeology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and teaches at the University of Vienna. ;

Doris Pany-Kucera studied biological anthropology at the University of Vienna, focusing on muscle marks and joint changes on skeletal remains to reconstruct occupational stress and labour patterns (PhD 2015). She teaches at the Universities of Vienna and Pilsen.
NEW: Networks and Monumentality in the Pacific Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 7 Session XXXVIII edited by Aymeric Hermann, Frédérique Valentin, Christophe Sand, Emilie Nolet. Paperback; 205x290mm; 104 pages; illutsrated throughout. 678 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697155. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697162. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Sessions XXXVIII-1,2 of UISPP 2018 in Paris were dedicated to monumental constructions and to complex exchange networks in the Pacific. Both topics have been extensively commented on and described by indigenous experts, explorers, missionaries, and scholars over the last two centuries, however these have been made famous only for the most impressive examples such as the moai statues of Rapa Nui (Easter Island) or the kula exchange system of the Trobriand Islands. Some of the latest research on these key aspects of Pacific islands societies are made available in this volume to researchers focusing on the region, but also to a more global scientific community and to the general public. The volume reflects the tremendous progress made in Pacific island archaeology in the last 60 years which has considerably advanced our knowledge of early Pacific island societies, the rise of traditional cultural systems, and their later historical developments from European contact onwards. Interdisciplinarity is particularly stimulating in the Pacific region, where the study of the archaeological record and of chronological sequences are often combined with other kinds of information such as ethnohistorical accounts, oral traditions, and linguistic reconstructions, in the French tradition of ethnoarchéologie and the American tradition of historical anthropology.

About the Editors
Aymeric Hermann is a post-doctoral researcher at the Max-Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. Since 2010, he has directed archaeological projects in several archipelagos of French Polynesia as well as in central Vanuatu. ;

Frédérique Valentin is a researcher in Oceanic archaeology at CNRS (UMR 7041, MSH Mondes, Nanterre, France). She specialises in funerary archaeology and biological anthropology. ;

Christophe Sand is Head Archaeologist for the New Caledonia Government at the IRD Research Centre in Nouméa, working on Southern Melanesia, Western Polynesia and Western Micronesia. ;

Emilie Nolet is an Assistant Professor in Archaeology at the University Paris I, Panthéon-Sorbonne.
NEW: El cerro de Alarcos (Ciudad Real): Formación y desarrollo de un oppidum ibérico 20 años de excavaciones arqueológicas en el Sector III by Mª del Rosario García Huerta, Francisco Javier Morales Hervás and David Rodríguez González. Paperback; 203x276mm; 160 pages; 64 figures, 13 tables (colour throughout). 671 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696912. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696929. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

El cerro de Alarcos (Ciudad Real): Formación y desarrollo de un oppidum ibérico presents the results of archaeological work which has been carried out since 1997 in so-called Sector III of the Alarcos site, located on a hill next to the Guadiana river, a few kilometres from Ciudad Real. These archaeological campaigns have made it possible to obtain essential information to understand the communities that, from the end of the Bronze Age to the end of the Iron Age, inhabited this large town and its surrounding area.

An interesting set of structures and other evidence of material culture have been recovered, which allow us to characterize the daily activities of people between the 10th-11th century BC and, in addition, they enable us to understand the paleoenvironment of this territory and the nature of the economy and the food transformation activities of these protohistoric populations.

The use of this territory has been determined over the centuries, being originally a residential area which later, in Iberian times, assumed economic functionality, as it was intended for grain storage, grinding and cooking food.

The documentation of a wide and varied repertoire of ceramic materials and an interesting set of foreign ceramics corroborates the dynamism this settlement achieved, during both the Pre-Iberian period and the full Iberian period.

About the Authors
Mª del Rosario García Huerta holds a PhD in Prehistory and is Senior Lecturer on this subject at the University of Castilla-La Mancha. ;

Francisco Javier Morales Hervás was awarded an extraordinary prize during his bachelor's degree and holds a PhD in History from the University of Castilla-La Mancha, where he is Associate Lecturer in Prehistory. ;

. David Rodríguez González is Lecturer in Prehistory at the University of Castilla-La Mancha, where he also coordinates the Degree in History and is a member of the Governing Council. ;

Spanish Description
El objeto de este libro es dar a conocer los trabajos de investigación arqueológica que desde 1997 se han realizado en el denominado Sector III del yacimiento de Alarcos, ubicado en un cerro situado junto al río Guadiana, a pocos kilómetros de Ciudad Real. Estas campañas arqueológicas han permitido obtener una información esencial para poder conocer a las comunidades que, desde finales de la Edad del Bronce hasta finales de la Edad del Hierro, habitaron este gran poblado y su área circundante.

Se ha logrado recuperar un interesante conjunto de estructuras y otras evidencias de la cultura material, que permiten caracterizar las actividades cotidianas que desempeñaban estas personas entre el siglo X a.C. y el II a.C. y, además, nos posibilitan realizar una aproximación al paleoambiente de este territorio y a las características de la economía y de las actividades de transformación de alimentos de estas poblaciones protohistóricas.

Se ha determinado su uso a lo largo de los siglos, siendo en origen un área residencial que posteriormente, en época ibérica, asumió una funcionalidad económica al estar destinada al almacenamiento de grano, a molienda y cocción de alimentos.

La documentación de un amplio y variado repertorio de materiales cerámicos y de un interesante conjunto de cerámicas foráneas corrobora el dinamismo que alcanzará este asentamiento, tanto en época Preibérica como durante el Ibérico pleno.

Mª del Rosario García Huerta es doctora en Prehistoria y profesora titular de esta materia en la Universidad de Castilla- La Mancha. Sus líneas de investigación se han centrado en las culturas protohistóricas de la península ibérica, celtibérica e ibérica y, más recientemente, ha iniciado el estudio del simbolismo animal en la Prehistoria. Es investigadora principal de numerosos proyectos de investigación arqueológicos y autora de un gran número de libros
NEW: The Global Connections of Gandhāran Art Proceedings of the Third International Workshop of the Gandhāra Connections Project, University of Oxford, 18th-19th March, 2019 edited by Wannaporn Rienjang and Peter Stewart. DOI: 10.32028/9781789696950; Paperback; 203x276mm; 276 pages; illustrated throughout. 669 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696950. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696967. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Gandhāran art is often regarded as the epitome of cultural exchange in antiquity. The ancient region of Gandhāra, centred on what is now the northern tip of Pakistan, has been called the ‘crossroads of Asia’. The Buddhist art produced in and around this area in the first few centuries AD exhibits extraordinary connections with other traditions across Asia and as far as the Mediterranean. Since the nineteenth century, the Graeco-Roman associations of Gandhāran art have attracted particular attention. Classically educated soldiers and administrators of that era were astonished by the uncanny resemblance of many works of Gandhāran sculpture to Greek and Roman art made thousands of miles to the west. More than a century later we can recognize that the Gandhāran artists’ appropriation of classical iconography and styles was diverse and extensive, but the explanation of this ‘influence’ remains puzzling and elusive. The Gandhāra Connections project at the University of Oxford’s Classical Art Research Centre was initiated principally to cast new light on this old problem.

This volume is the third set of proceedings of the project’s annual workshop, and the first to address directly the question of cross-cultural influence on and by Gandhāran art. The contributors wrestle with old controversies, particularly the notion that Gandhāran art is a legacy of Hellenistic Greek rule in Central Asia and the growing consensus around the important role of the Roman Empire in shaping it. But they also seek to present a more complex and expansive view of the networks in which Gandhāra was embedded. Adopting a global perspective on the subject, they examine aspects of Gandhāra’s connections both within and beyond South Asia and Central Asia, including the profound influence which Gandhāran art itself had on the development of Buddhist art in China and India.

About the Editors
Wannaporn Rienjang obtained her doctorate in Archaeology from University of Cambridge. She is now Lecturer in Archaeology, Museum and Heritage Studies at the Faculty of Sociology and Anthropology, Thammasat University and a project consultant for the Gandhāra Connections Project at the Classical Art Research Centre, Oxford. Her research focuses on the art and archaeology of Greater Gandhāra, Indian Ocean Trade and ancient working technologies of stone beads and vessels. ;

Peter Stewart is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. He has worked widely in the field of ancient sculpture. His publications include Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008). Much of his research concerns the relationship between Gandhāran a
NEW: The Changing Landscapes of Rome’s Northern Hinterland The British School at Rome’s Tiber Valley Project by Helen Patterson, Robert Witcher and Helga Di Giuseppe. Paperback; 205x290mm; 372 pages; 131 figures, 21 tables (colour throughout). 665 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 70. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696158. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696165. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Changing Landscapes of Rome’s Northern Hinterland presents a new regional history of the middle Tiber valley as a lens through which to view the emergence and transformation of the city of Rome from 1000 BC to AD 1000. Setting the ancient city within the context of its immediate territory, the authors reveal the diverse and enduring links between the metropolis and its hinterland. At the heart of the volume is a detailed consideration of the results of a complete restudy of the pioneering South Etruria Survey (c. 1955–1970), one of the earliest and most influential Mediterranean landscape projects. Between 1998 and 2002, an international team based at the British School at Rome conducted a comprehensive restudy of the material and documentary archive generated by the South Etruria Survey. The results were supplemented with a number of other published and unpublished sources of archaeological evidence to create a database of around 5000 sites across southern Etruria and the Sabina Tiberina, extending in date from the Bronze Age, through the Etruscan/Sabine, Republican and imperial periods, to the middle ages. Analysis and discussion of these data have appeared in a series of interim articles published over the past two decades; the present volume offers a final synthesis of the project results.

The chapters include the first detailed assessment of the field methods of the South Etruria Survey, an extended discussion of the use of archaeological legacy data, and new insights into the social and economic connectivities between Rome and the communities of its northern hinterland across two millennia. The volume as a whole demonstrates how the archaeological evidence generated by landscape surveys can be used to rewrite narrative histories, even those based on cities as familiar as ancient Rome.

Includes contributions by Martin Millett, Simon Keay and Christopher Smith, and a preface by Andrew Wallace-Hadrill.

About the Authors
Helen Patterson is the former Assistant Director (Archaeology) of the British School at Rome and director of the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project (1998–2002). She is a specialist in the archaeology of the late antique and early medieval periods, with particular interests in ceramic production and distribution. She has published a series of edited volumes including Bridging the Tiber (2004), Mercator Placidissimus (with F. Coarelli, 2008) and Veii: the historical topography of the ancient city (with R. Cascino & H. Di Giuseppe, 2012).

Robert Witcher is Associate Professor of Archaeology at Durham University, UK. From 1999 to 2002, he was a researcher on the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project based at the British School in Rome. His research interests include landscape archaeology with a particular focus on the pre-Roman and Roman periods in Italy and the wider Mediterranean. He has published on aspects of ancient rural settlement, agriculture, demography and globalization. He is the editor of the world archaeology journal, Antiquity.

Helga Di Giuseppe specialises in Italian archaeology with particular interests in the classical and late antique periods. She has published widely on ancient landscape, Roman villas, and ceramic and textile production, and has edited several major excavation and conference volumes. From 1998 to 2002, she was a researcher on the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project based at the British School in Rome. She is currently project manager for Fasti Online with the International Association of Classical Archaeology and editorial manager with the publisher Scienze e Lettere.
NEW: A Catalogue of the Sculpture Collection at Wilton House by Peter Stewart with new photography by Guido Petruccioli. Hardback with Dust Jacket; 229x305mm; 438 pages; 14 figures and 154 plates in full colour throughout. 661 2020. ISBN 9781789696554. £90.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Wilton House sculptures constituted one of the largest and most celebrated collections of ancient art in Europe. Originally comprising some 340 works, the collection was formed around the late 1710s and 1720s by Thomas Herbert, the eccentric 8th Earl of Pembroke, who stubbornly ‘re-baptized’ his busts and statues with names of his own choosing. His sources included the famous collection of Cardinal Mazarin, assembled in Paris in the 1640s and 1650s, and recent discoveries on the Via Appia outside Rome. Earl Thomas regarded the sculptures as ancient – some of them among the oldest works of art in existence – but in fact much of the collection is modern and represents the neglected talents of sixteenth-and seventeenth-century artists, restorers and copyists who were inspired by Greek and Roman sculpture.

About half of the original collection remains intact today, adorning the Gothic Cloisters that were built for it two centuries ago. After a long decline, accelerated by the impact of the Second World War, the sculptures have been rehabilitated in recent years. They include masterpieces of Roman and early modern art, which cast fresh light on Graeco-Roman antiquity, the classical tradition, and the history of collecting.

Illustrated with specially commissioned photographs, this catalogue offers the first comprehensive publication of the 8th Earl’s collection, including an inventory of works dispersed from Wilton. It re-presents his personal vision of the collection recorded in contemporary manuscripts. At the same time, it dismantles some of the myths about it which originated with the earl himself, and provides an authoritative archaeological and art-historical analysis of the artefacts.

About the Author
Peter Stewart is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. His research ranges across many aspects of Greek and Roman sculpture and the relationships between different artistic traditions. His previous publications include, Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008).

Guido Petruccioli is an Oxford University-trained classical archaeologist and professional photographer with specialist interests in Roman imperial portraiture and the documentation of ancient sculpture.
NEW: The Later Saxon and Early Norman Manorial Settlement at Guiting Power, Gloucestershire: Archaeological Investigation of a Domesday Book Entry by Alistair Marshall. Paperback; 205x290mm; 124 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 658 2020. ISBN 9781789693652. £28.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This report outlines investigation of the early manor at Guiting Power, a village in the Cotswolds with Saxon origins, lying in an area with interesting entries in the Domesday Survey of 1086.

Excavation has shown that, during the later Saxon period, a lightly defended compound contained a principal area of habitation, with an adjacent, more open ‘working area’ partly divided by ditched sub-enclosures, perhaps related to subsidiary settlement, or other economic activity. This complex may have formed the main estate-centre for a more extensive land-holding, scattered over the northern Cotswolds, and leased from the king, its last Saxon tenant being one ‘Alwin’, as sheriff of the county a thegn of some standing.

During the major economic and social changes following the Conquest, under a change to Norman lordship, the manorial perimeter was reinforced, and a small apsidal church was constructed within it, now restored as a standing monument. Subsequently, a new complex of manorial buildings was established on a fresh site within the enclosure, the precursor of the present parish church was constructed nearby, with further development of manor and village into the full medieval period.

About the Author
Alistair Marshall has a formal background in archaeology and the natural sciences, general interests in European prehistory, and is currently developing various projects including: application of remote sensing, from broader study of landscapes to detailed interpretation of ritual monuments with related experimental work; structural analysis of megalithic sites, with especial reference to interpretation of axial alignment; investigation of broader aspects of tribal economies during the later Iron Age in Britain and Northwestern Europe.
NEW: The Development of an Iron Age and Roman Settlement Complex at The Park and Bowsings, near Guiting Power, Gloucestershire: Farmstead and Stronghold by Alistair Marshall. Paperback; 205x290mm; 204 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. (RRP: £32.00). 657 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693638. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693645. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This report outlines excavation of a small complex of iron age and Roman settlement near Guiting Power in the Cotswolds. A relatively undefended farmstead of middle iron age date was abandoned, to be followed by an adjacent, more substantial, ditched enclosure of the mid to later iron age, which appears to have been a stronghold of higher status, with less directly agrarian associations. This latter site became dilapidated, or was perhaps slighted, during the latest iron age or early Roman period, with a Romanised farmstead developing over the traditional habitation area, this providing evidence for occupation until the late 4th century AD. The sequence of settlement indicates social, economic, and environmental changes occurring in the area from the ‘proto-Dobunnic’ to late Roman periods.

Excavation of pits at the site has provided the basis for experimental investigation of grain storage.

Alistair Marshall has a formal background in archaeology and the natural sciences, general but not exclusive interests in European prehistory, and is currently developing various projects, which include the following: -application of remote sensing, from broader study of landscapes to detailed interpretation of ritual monuments, with related experimental work; -structural analysis of megalithic sites, with especial reference to interpretation of axial alignment; -investigation of broader aspects of tribal economies during the later Iron Age in Britain and NW’n Europe.

About the Author
Alistair Marshall has a formal background in archaeology and the natural sciences, general interests in European prehistory, and is currently developing various projects including: application of remote sensing, from broader study of landscapes to detailed interpretation of ritual monuments with related experimental work; structural analysis of megalithic sites, with especial reference to interpretation of axial alignment; investigation of broader aspects of tribal economies during the later Iron Age in Britain and Northwestern Europe.
NEW: Human Transgression – Divine Retribution A Study of Religious Transgressions and Punishments in Greek Cultic Regulation and Lydian-Phrygian Propitiatory Inscriptions (‘Confession Inscriptions’) by Aslak Rostad. Paperback; 175x245; 252 pages. 629 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695250. £39.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695267. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £39.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Human Transgression – Divine Retribution analyses pagan concepts of religious transgressions, how they should be regarded and punished, as expressed in Greek cultic regulations from the 5th century BC to the 3rd century AD. Also considered are the so-called propitiatory inscriptions (often referred to as ‘confession inscriptions’) from the 1st to the 3rd century AD Lydia and Phrygia, in light of ‘cultic morality’, an ideal code of behaviour intended to make places, occasions, and worshippers suitable for ritual. This code is on the one hand associated with ‘purity’ (hagneia) and removal of pollution (miasma) caused by deaths, births and sexuality, and on the other with the protection of sacred property. This study seeks to explain the emphasis of divine punishments in the Lydian and Phrygian inscriptions, while rare in most Greek cultic regulations, as part of a continuum within pagan religion rather than as a result of an absolute division between Greek and Oriental religion.

About the Author
Aslak Rostad (born 1972) holds a PhD in Ancient Greek and is Associate Professor of Classics at Norwegian University of Technology and Science (NTNU), Trondheim.
NEW: Foragers in the middle Limpopo Valley: Trade, Place-making, and Social Complexity by Tim Forssman. Paperback; 203x276mm; 140 pages; 54 figures, 13 tables (colour throughout). 122 2020 Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 100. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696851. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696868. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Between the last centuries BC and the early second millennium AD, central southern Africa witnessed massive social change. Several landscapes hosted a variety of socio-political developments that led to the establishment of state-level society at Mapungubwe, c. 1220 AD in the middle Limpopo Valley. These different landscapes were connected through various forms of circuitry, including social, political, economic and topographic networks. While most often these systems and developments are discussed in the context of farmer societies, local forager communities also saw associated shifts. They were present from before the arrival of farmers and not only witnessed but also participated in local systems leading to the appearance of complex society. Despite numerous studies in the valley, this has not been explored; generally, forager involvement in socio-political developments has been ignored and only farmer sequences have been considered. However, from the early first millennium AD, foragers themselves transformed their own society. Changes have been noted in settlement patterns, craft production, trade relations, social interactions, wealth accumulation, and status. Moreover, these changes occurred unevenly across the landscape; at different forager sites, different responses to shifting social networks have been recorded. When viewed together, the spectrum of change suggests that valley foragers developed social complexity.

About the Author
Tim Forssman is a senior lecturer at the University of Pretoria. Previously, he managed a dam development mitigation project in Lesotho and was a postdoctoral reader at the Universities of the Witwatersrand and Pretoria. His research interests include forager-farmer interactions, forager economies, trade dynamics, landscape archaeology, and rock art.
Amor Estratigráfico El libro by Juan I. García. Paperback; 148x210mm; 300 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 27 2020. ISBN 9788494211034. £18.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

After years of waiting, with intermittent protests at the Arqueoart and JAS Arqueología headquarters, we have been able to carry out the edition of the final book on Stratigraphic Love with the entire first season, commented on and full of surprises. Worthy? Surely not, but we've had a great time doing it. So buy it and enjoy it. Rod and honour! Stratigraphy or death! A different archaeology is possible...

Uno de los objetivos de este proyecto es presentar la Arqueología de una forma amena, divertida, irónica pero incisiva científicamente, donde gracias a la utilización de un formato 3.0, poder presentar temas, personas, escenarios de una realidad, y hacerlo asequible al gran público, gracias a la difusión que nos dan las redes sociales y la red de redes. Aparte de esto, utilizamos estos caudales como un medio de adaptabilidad de contenidos a ciertos colectivos con algún tipo de discapacidad. Si tenemos 5 sentidos, ¿porque tan pocas veces adaptamos contenidos a todos los sentidos posibles?
Arqueologías Vitales edited by Henry Tantalean and Cristobal Gnecco. Paperback; 148x210mm; 300 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 26 2019. ISBN 9788416725229. £13.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The texts in this book are autobiographical. Unlike so many academic writings, they do not hide, but rather make visible, everything that happens between fieldwork and writing, that space so productive but so contentious that it is usually eliminated, denied, altered. The authors speak in the first person, without hiding behind anything and anyone, without resorting to the hackneyed formulas so repeated in academia that modernity made: an impersonal voice, without position, that speaks from nowhere but pretends to know and see everything. Archaeologists learn to do and write (not write) in a way and they never change it. They learn the canon of what can be said and what cannot be said. Correctly academic. Instead, these first-person voices decentralize the canon because they speak of what should not be spoken from where it cannot be said. The authors write about their transformation as archaeologists through their practice which, usually but not always, involved their relationship with other(s).

Table of Contents
Conversación en Lima – Cristóbal Gnecco y Henry Tantaleán ;
Seguir la huella y curar el rastro. Memorias de una experiencia colectiva de investigación y militancia en el campo de arqueología argentina – Ivana Carina Jofré ;
Arqueo-devenires, Zarankin-centrismos y presentes contaminados – Texto: Andrés Zarankin, Dibujos: Iván Zigarán ;
Cuando descubres que el arqueólogo local no eres tú. Dos encuentros con la isla Pariti – Juan Villanueva Criales ;
Sueño y catarsis: hacia una arqueología post- humanista – José Roberto Pellini ;
La cerámica de Anuma’i y las marcas del fin del mundo – Fabíola Andréa Silva ;
La arqueología en la era del multiculturalismo neoliberal: una reflexión autobiográfica desde San Pedro de Atacama (norte de Chile) – Patricia Ayala Rocabado ;
Confesiones de un postarqueólogo – Cristóbal Gnecco ;
Entre el Cauca y el Magdalena: una historia apócrifa de la arqueología colombiana en el último tercio del siglo XX – Wilhelm Londoño ;
Cuando el “otro” eres tú. Encuentros de un empresario español en América – Jaime Almansa Sánchez ;
Entrando y saliendo de la arqueología peruana: memorias presentes de un pasado reciente – Henry Tantaleán ;
Arqueólogos remando entre las verdades y las injusticias – José María López Mazz ;
Sobre los autores
Paisaje y patrimonio Un mismo destino a compartir by Josep Ballart Hernández. Paperback; 125x175mm; 140 pages. 25 2018. ISBN 9788416725212. Buy Now

After a seminar on heritage management and tourism at Yucatán University, Mexico, prof. Gonzalo Ruiz Zapatero suggested to make a book out of it delving into the concepts of landscape and heritage.

Este libro tiene su origen en un seminario impartido en la Universidad de Yucatán (Mérida), México, sobre gestión del patrimonio y turismo, a invitación del arqueólogo Josep Ligorred. Un par de años más tarde el profesor de la Universidad Complutense de Madrid Gonzalo Ruiz Zapatero me sugirió convertir en libro el trabajo que continuaba aquellas reflexiones, encauzado ahora bajo la denominación de "Paisaje y patrimonio", que el editor Jaime Almansa ha aceptado de publicar en su colección sobre Arqueología. A todos ellos agradezco la parte que les corresponde para que esta propuesta pueda llegar a un público más amplio.
NEW: Ash-Sharq - Bulletin of the Ancient Near East Vol 4 2020 Archaeological, Historical and Societal Studies edited by Laura Battini (editor-in-chief). Paperback; 175x254mm; 324 pages; illustrated throughout. Papers in English and Arabic. 4 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697803. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697810. £10.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £68.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Please note the 2020 volume has been released in one extended issue, rather than in two separate parts.

Note for institutional subscribers: Please be sure to log in first via your institution's unique URL - this page will then display download options. Otherwise only purchase options will display. If you experience difficulties logging in please consult your librarian or contact Archaeopress directly via the following email: info@archaeopress.com

NEW: Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 4 2019 edited by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Patricia Kögler. Paperback; 210x297mm; 204 pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 4 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697841. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Download Full PDF   Buy Now

JHP is an independent learned journal dedicated to the research of ceramics and objects of daily use of the Hellenistic period in the Mediterranean region and beyond. It aims at bringing together archaeologists, historians, philologists, numismatists and scholars of related disciplines engaged in the research of the Hellenistic heritage.

ARTICLES ;
Understanding the Jal el-Bahr Storage-Jar Assemblage – Donald T. Ariel ;
Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeologica Project: Excavations at Pyla-Vigla in 2019 – Justin Stephens, Brandon R. Olson, Thomas Landvatter & R. Scott Moore ;
A Hellenistic Farmhouse at the Entrance to the Town of El’ad – All Nagorsky ;
Cave 169 at Marisa: The Imported Ptolemaic Red Ware – Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom ;
Lissos in Illyria: Two Centuries of Hellenistic Pottery, and a Plea for the Publication of Contextual Material – Patricia Kögler ;

BOOK REVIEWS ;
Sarah James, Hellenistic Pottery. The Fine Wares, Corinth 7, 7 – Brice Erickson ;
Gabriel Mazor, Walid Atrash & Gerald Finkielsztejn, Bet She’an IV. Hellenistic Nisa-Scythopolis. The Amphora Stamps and Sealings from Tel Iztabba – Marek Palaczyk ;
Henrieta Todorova (ed.), Durankulak 3. Die hellenistischen Befunde – Reyhan Şahin ;
Idit Sagiv, Representations of Animals on Greek and Roman Engraved Gems. Meaning and Interpretations – Shua Amorai-Stark & Malka Hershkovitz ;
Kalliope Bairami, Large Scale Rhodian Sculpture of Hellenistic and Roman Times – Natalia Kazakidi ;
Qumran, Unchecked Parallelomina, and Pseudonymity in Academic Publication, review article of Kenneth Silver, Alexandria and Qumran: Back to the Beginning – Dennis Mizzi
NEW: Mapping the Past: From Sampling Sites and Landscapes to Exploring the ‘Archaeological Continuum’ edited by Michel Dabas, Stefano Campana and Apostolos Sarris. Paperback; 205x290mm; 94 pages; 35 figures, 1 table (colour throughout). 676 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697131. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697148 . Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Session VIII-1 of UISPP 2018 in Paris ‘Mapping the Past’ brought together several contributions reflecting on the need to develop sustainable and reliable approaches to mapping our landscape heritage. The session was guided by the crucial concept termed the ‘archaeological continuum’. This concept can be defined as a proactive approach to landscape survey based on the summative evidence detected (or detectable) within the area under examination, reducing spatial and chronological gaps as far as possible through the intensive and extensive application of a wide variety of exploratory methods and analytical techniques. Research work across Europe as well as contributions presented in this session have demonstrated that it is now possible to explore the whole landscape of carefully chosen areas and study them as an archaeological continuum. Archaeological interpretations derived from this kind of approach can be expected to reveal different layers of information belonging to a variety of chronological horizons, each displaying mutual physical (stratigraphic) and conceptual relationships within that horizon. The raising of new archaeological questions and also the development of alternative conservation strategies directly stimulated by the radical ideas inherent in the concept of the ‘archaeological continuum’ are among the major outcomes of the session.

About the Editors
Michel Dabas is Senior Researcher and Co-Director of the Laboratory of Archaeology at Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris (AOROC) where he develops approaches for the provision of interactive maps on the web (chronocarto.eu portal) and focuses on the application of geophysical methods for archaeological sites. ;

Stefano R.L. Campana is Professor of Landscape Archaeology at the University of Siena. His research is focused on the understanding of past Mediterranean landscapes from late prehistory to contemporary times. ;

Apostolos Sarris is ‘Sylvia Ioannou’ Professor of Digital Humanities at the Archaeological Research Unit, University of Cyprus and Research Director at F.O.R.T.H.: Head of the GeoSat ReSeArch Lab. He is an Adjunct/Affiliate Professor at Cyprus University of Technology and a Research Associate of the Department of Anthropology, the Field Museum of Natural History of Chicago, Illinois, USA. His research focuses on geophysical prospection, GIS spatial modelling and satellite remote sensing in archaeology.
NEW: The Turkish Long-Necked Lute Saz or Bağlama by Hans de Zeeuw. Paperback; 175x245mm; 138 pages; 70 figures, colour throughout. 675 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694321. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694338. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £26.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The saz or bağlama, a generic name for long-necked lutes in Turkey, plays an important role in the Turkish musical culture. It forms the core of all folk musical ensembles and orchestras and is a popular instrument in the arabesque, entertainment, and pop music. It is the instrument par excellence in Turkish music education and in the religious rituals of the Âlevi and Bektaşi. The saz or bağlama can also be heard as a solo instrument on international concert stages. Acknowledging the instrument’s unique place in Turkey, The Turkish Long-Necked Lute Saz or Bağlama, an updated and revised edition of the Dutch book Turkse Langhalsluit of bağlama, mainly focusses on its cultural and historical background while briefly discussing various saz or bağlama types and their construction, tuning, and playing techniques.

About the Author
Hans de Zeeuw began to take bağlama lessons and became interested in its long and fascinating history while working at the Free University in Amsterdam and studying at the Open University. This led him to decide to break of his studies and focus, for many years, on research into the Turkish saz or bağlama under the supervision of Dr Leo Plenckers of the Department of Musicology of the University of Amsterdam and Dr Okan Murat Öztürk of the Devlet Konservatuvarı of the Başkent Üniversitesi in Ankara. In 2009 he published De Turkse Langhalsluit of bağlama (Turkish Long-Necked Lute or Bağlama) with the support of the Dutch Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds. His lecture to the Uluslararası Müzik Kongresi in Istanbul in 2006 was published in Türkiyede Müzik Kültürü in 2011. A short article about the Ottoman tanbûr, The Ottoman Tanbûr. Introducing the Long-Necked Lute of Ottoman Classical Music, followed in 2018. İn 2019, his book Tanbûr Long-Necked Lutes along the Silk Road and beyond, supervised by Dr Saskia Willaert of the Musical Instruments Museum in Brussels, Dr Alper Maral of the Sanat Tasarım Fakültesi, Müzik ve Sahne Sanatları Bölüm, of the Yıldız Teknik Üniversitesi, and Dr Martin Greve in Istanbul, was published by Archaeopress in Oxford. At the moment he is working as a freelance researcher, living in Istanbul, on an in-depth study of the Ottoman tanbûr.
NEW: Places of Memory: Spatialised Practices of Remembrance from Prehistory to Today edited by Christian Horn, Gustav Wollentz, Gianpiero Di Maida, and Annette Haug. Paperback; 205x290mm; 164 pages; 56 figures, colour throughout. 674 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696134. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696141. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Places of Memory takes a new look at spatialised practices of remembrance and its role in reshaping societies from prehistory to today, gathering researchers representing diverse but complementary fields of expertise. This diachronic outlook provides important insights into the great variety of human and social reactions examining memory, encompassing aspects of remembering, the loss of memory, reclaiming memories, and remembering things that may not have happened. The contributions to this volume expand upon Pierre Nora’s concept of lieux des memoire (places of memory) and the notion that memory is not just stored in these places but activated through human engagement. The volume presents a reflection on the creation of memories through the organisation and use of landscapes and spaces that explicitly considers the multiplicity of meanings of the past. Thus, social identities were created, reaffirmed, strengthened, and transformed through the founding, change, and reorganization of places and spaces of memory in the cultural landscape.

About the Editors
Christian Horn is a researcher and lecturer at the Department for Historical Studies at the University of Gothenburg. His scholarship focuses on Scandinavian rock art and prehistoric conflict. He is the current research coordinator of the Swedish Rock Art Research Archives as well as an advisory board member. Currently, he develops Artificial Intelligence approaches to rock art in a project funded by Riksbankens Jubileumsfond (Sweden). This project includes conducting fieldwork at UNESCO world heritage site Tanum documenting rock art in 3D. He is a prolific writer in the fields of prehistoric conflict, rock art, and digital archaeology. ;

Gustav Wollentz defended his PhD in the summer of 2018 at the Graduate School Human Development in Landscapes, Kiel University, Germany, focusing on the relationship between difficult heritage and temporalities. He received his Bachelor and Master degree in Archaeology from Linnaeus University in Sweden. He was previously (2012-2013) involved in a research project led by Cornelius Holtorf and Anders Högberg at Linnaeus University, where he studied future perspectives within heritage management. During a period in 2018 and 2019, he was hired within the AHRC-funded ‘Heritage Futures’ project to co-author a chapter on ‘Toxic heritage’. He is currently project leader/researcher at the Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity. ;

Gianpiero Di Maida, born in Palermo (Italy) in 1980, has completed his Ph.D. at CAU Kiel in 2018, defending a thesis on the Lateglacial rock and mobile art record of Sicily, Italy. This work, recently published, has been awarded with the Johanna Mestorf Price 2019. He is currently serving as the scientific manager of the DISAPALE project at the Neanderthal Museum. ;

Annette Haug is professor for Classical Archaeology at the Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel. Her research interests concern visual culture studies on the one hand, questions of urban lifestyles and urban design on the other. After her habilitation in 2009 in Leipzig, Haug became Heisenberg fellow at the University in Munich (LMU). After receiving the professorship in Kiel in 2012 she became the co-coordinator of the graduate school ‘Human Development in Landscapes’. She has received an ERC Consolidator Grant for research into Decorative Systems in Pompeii and Herculaneum.
NEW: Environment and Religion in Ancient and Coptic Egypt: Sensing the Cosmos through the Eyes of the Divine Proceedings of the 1st Egyptological Conference of the Hellenic Institute of Egyptology, Co–Organized with the Writing & Scripts Centre of the Bibliotheca Alexandrina and the Institute of Coptic Studies (University of Alexandria), at the People’s University of Athens, under the High Auspices of His Eminence Mgr Damianos, Archbishop of Sinai. Athens: Wednesday 1st, Thursday 2nd & Friday 3rd February 2017 edited by Alicia Maravelia and Nadine Guilhou. Paperback; 210x297mm; 582 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour. 673 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 30. ISBN 9781789696394. £90.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Environment and Religion in Ancient and Coptic Egypt: Sensing the Cosmos through the Eyes of the Divine presents the proceedings of a conference held in Athens between 1st-3rd February 2017. The Hellenic Institute of Egyptology, in close collaboration with the Writing & Scripts Centre of Bibliotheca Alexandrina and the University of Alexandria, organized the conference concerning the ancient Egyptian religion, Coptic Christianity and Environment. Thus, the endeavour was to sense the Cosmos, through a virtual Einfahlung, as a manifestation of the Divine and the manifestations of the Divine in the environmental, cosmic and societal spheres. Egyptians were particularly pious and they considered their surroundings and the Universe itself as a creation and a direct immanence of the Divine, being also convinced that they were congenital parts of the Cosmos and adoring their divinities, who were also personifications of environmental and/or cosmic aspects and forces. There are many examples (epigraphic, textual, monumental, & c.) corroborating these relations and that ancient Egyptian piety was rooted on the bi-faceted texture of the ancient Egyptian religion, containing a solar and an astral component: the former was related to Rec, while the latter was related to Osiris. The conference took place with participations of a pleiade of Egyptologists, archaeologists, archaeoastronomers, theologians, historians and other scholars from more than 15 countries all over the world. In this unique volume are published most of the contributions of the delegates who sent their papers for peer-reviewing, enriching the bibliographic resources with original and interesting articles. This publication of more than 580 pages containing 34 fresh and original papers (plus 2 abstracts) on the ancient Egyptian religion, Environment and the Cosmos, fruitfully connects many interdisciplinary approaches and Egyptology, archaeology, archaeoastronomy, geography, botany, zoology, ornithology, theology and history.

About the Editors
Alicia Maravelia is Founder and President of the Hellenic Institute of Egyptology (2011). She is Professor of Egyptology at the People's University of Athens and Institute's Seminar. A member of the Editorial Board of several peer-reviewed journals, she is the Editor in Chief of the JHIE. She is Coordinator of the Athens Mummy Project. ;

Nadine Guilhou studied French Literature, History of Art & Archaeology in the University Paul-Valery, Montpellier, obtaining her PhD in Egyptology under Prof. Dr Fr. Daumas. She specializes in ritual and funerary texts from the OK to the PP and has published many books and papers concerning this topic.
NEW: Egypt and Austria XII - Egypt and the Orient: The Current Research Proceedings of the Conference Held at the Faculty of Croatian Studies, University of Zagreb (September 17th-22nd, 2018) edited by Mladen Tomorad. Paperback; 148x210mm; 418 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 672 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697643. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697650. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The 12th Egypt and Austria conference (Zagreb, 17–22 September 2018) was organised by the Egypt and Austria Society and the Faculty of the Croatian Studies of the University of Zagreb. The event took place in the Croatian Institute of History (Opatička 10, Zagreb). The main theme of the conference was current research related to the interactions between Egypt and the states of the former Habsburg Monarchy and the Ottoman Empire up to the middle of the 20th century. During the conference more than 39 papers were presented, of which 26 are presented in this proceedings volume.

About the Editor
Mladen Tomorad is a senior researcher and professor of Ancient History at the Department of History, University of Zagreb. He has a masters degree in History and a PhD in Ancient History and Museology, and he has also studied Egyptology at the University of Manchester.
NEW: Excavations at Chester. The Northern and Eastern Roman Extramural Settlements Excavations 1990-2019 and other investigations by Leigh Dodd. Paperback; 205x290mm; 142 pages; illustrated throughout. 668 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 71. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696271. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696288. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Excavations at Chester: the northern and eastern Roman extramural settlements presents the results of fifteen archaeological investigations carried out within the canabae to the north and east of the Roman legionary fortress at Chester between 1990 and 2019. The results demonstrate that there was sparse development of the canabae to the north of the fortress during the 1st and 2nd centuries; instead, this area was predominantly used for the extraction of building materials⁠ – sandstone and clay. By the 3rd century, the final phase of usage took the form of a small cemetery, the first to be examined in this area. Subject to more constraints, the sites investigated within the eastern canabae close to the fortress produced limited evidence for urban plot divisions, whilst those further east provided evidence for the division and management of agricultural land forming the prata legionis.

About the Author
Leigh Dodd has worked in the commercial sector of archaeology since the early 1990s. During this time he has excavated a wide range of sites including many of the Roman and post-medieval periods, several of which have been published in regional and international journals. Additionally, he has written many finds reports for a wide-range of clients. He is also a Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists.
NEW: IKUWA6. Shared Heritage: Proceedings of the Sixth International Congress for Underwater Archaeology 28 November–2 December 2016, Western Australian Maritime Museum Fremantle, Western Australia edited by Jennifer A. Rodrigues and Arianna Traviglia. Paperback; 205x290mm; 698 pages; illustrated throughout in colour. 666 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916428. £95.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916435. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Celebrating the theme ‘Shared heritage’, IKUWA6 (the 6th International Congress for Underwater Archaeology), was the first such major conference to be held in the Asia-Pacific region, and the first IKUWA meeting hosted outside Europe since the organisation’s inception in Germany in the 1990s. A primary objective of holding IKUWA6 in Australia was to give greater voice to practitioners and emerging researchers across the Asia and Pacific regions who are often not well represented in northern hemisphere scientific gatherings of this scale; and, to focus on the areas of overlap in our mutual heritage, techniques and technology. Drawing together peer-reviewed presentations by delegates from across the world who converged in Fremantle in 2016 to participate, this volume covers a stimulating diversity of themes and niche topics of value to maritime archaeology practitioners, researchers, students, historians and museum professionals across the world.

About the Editors
Jennifer Rodrigues graduated as an archaeologist in Australia before specialising her training at the University of Southampton’s Centre for Maritime Archaeology, England, in 2000, after which she joined the Mary Rose Trust. Upon returning to Australia, she worked as a heritage consultant in Victoria and New South Wales, investigating Indigenous heritage sites, before joining the Western Australian Museum as Curator, Collections Manager then Exhibitions Project Manager over 16 years. She completed her doctorate at the University of Western Australia in 2011, and was Editor of the Australasian Journal for Maritime Archaeology from 2012 to 2015. In 2019 she joined the National Museum of Australia in Canberra as Senior Curator of the Centre for Indigenous Knowledges.

Arianna Traviglia is the Coordinator of the IIT Centre for Cultural Heritage Technology (Italy). Trained as an archaeologist, her work primarily focuses on mediating the inclusion of digital technology within the study of archaeological landscapes, especially waterscapes and lagoon environments. From 2006 to 2015 she held positions as Postdoctoral Fellow in Australia at Sydney and Macquarie Universities, before re-entering European academia as recipient of a Marie Curie Fellowship in 2015. She is Co- Editor of the Journal of Computer Application in Archaeology (JCAA) and currently a member of the Management Committee of the EC COST Action Arkwork, and a PI on the H2020 NETCHER project focused on protection of endangered Cultural Heritage.
NEW: Wholesome Dwellings: Housing Need in Oxford and the Municipal Response, 1800-1939 by Malcolm Graham. Paperback; 205x255mm; 124 pages; 40 figures, 2 tables (colour throughout). Print RRP: £30.00. 663 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697353. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697360. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A shortage of affordable new housing, builders choosing to build larger, more profitable houses, and a diminishing stock of cheap houses for rent. All this sounds very familiar today, but at the end of the Great War, scarcely any houses had been built for four years and there was political pressure to build ‘Homes for Heroes’, impelled to a degree by fear of revolution. Council housing, supported by central government funding, was the chosen solution in 1919, and this study by Malcolm Graham, a leading Oxford local historian for many years, examines the consequences in Oxford, then a university city on the cusp of change. Behind the city’s Dreaming Spires image, housing for the working population was already in short supply, but an economy-minded and largely non-political City Council had always been reluctant to intervene in the housing market. In 1919, there was no hint of the city’s industrial future, and the City Council saw the replacement of substandard houses as its main challenge. The meteoric rise of the local motor industry in the early 1920s led to rapid population growth and created a massive new demand for cheap housing. Dr Graham examines the uneasy partnership between the City Council and Whitehall which led to the building of over 3,000 council houses in Oxford between the Wars. The provision of these ‘wholesome dwellings’ was a substantial, and lasting, achievement, but private builders were in fact catering for most housing need in and around the city by the 1930s. The notorious Cutteslowe Walls, built to exclude council tenants from an adjoining private estate, reflected the way in which the growing city was being socially segregated. Dr Graham provides a fascinating insight into how modern Oxford evolved away from the university buildings and college quadrangles for which the city is internationally renowned.

About the Author
Malcolm Graham gained a B.A. in History at Nottingham University and an M.A. in English Local History at Leicester. A qualified librarian, he became Oxford City’s first full-time local history librarian in 1970 and has been hugely active in Oxford and Oxfordshire local history ever since. He completed a PhD at Leicester University in 1985, and was elected a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London in 1999.
NEW: The Archaeology of Medieval Towns: Case Studies from Japan and Europe edited by Simon Kaner, Brian Ayers, Richard Pearson and Oscar Wrenn. Paperback; 210x297mm; 154pp; 111 black & white figures. 649 2020 Comparative and Global Perspectives on Japanese Archaeology 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694260. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694277. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In recent years, major new archaeological discoveries have redefined the development of towns and cities in the Japanese archipelago. The uncovering of the plans of major port towns such as Sakai, Kusado Sengen and Ichijōdani, and the revealing of early phases in the development of cities such as Kamakura and Hakata provide an important new resource in understanding the cultural and economic processes which shaped medieval Japan.

This fully illustrated book provides a sampler of these findings for a western audience. The new discoveries from Japan are set in context of medieval archaeology beyond Japan by accompanying essays from leading European specialists.

The global significance of Japanese medieval archaeology is assessed through comparing the development of towns in Japan and northern Europe. The medieval period in Japan and northwest Europe saw urban growth with towns not only providing centres of administration but also fostering economic development. The pressures which led to such growth, however, be they political or social, were universal in character. following basic requirements of food, shelter, security and spiritual nourishment, towns provided commercial infrastructures, transport and storage facilities, and the setting for trade, craft specialists and art.

Chapters include ‘The archaeology of medieval towns in Japan and europe: an introduction’ (Brian Ayers and Simon Kaner); ‘Permanent urban frameworks (‘armature’) and economic networks in northern France c.700 – c.1000’ (Henri Galinié); ‘Medieval urbanism and culture in the cities of the Baltic: with a comparison between Lübeck, Germany, and Sakai, Japan’ (Manfred Gläser); ‘The development of Hakata as a medieval port town’ (Ōba Kōji); ‘The establishment and transformation of Japan’s medieval capital, Kamakura’ (Oka Yōichirō); ‘Ichijōdani: the archaeology of a Japanese medieval castle town’ (Ono Masatoshi); ‘Japanese medieval trading towns: Sakai and Tosaminato’ (Richard Pearson); and ‘Medieval ceramic production in the aegean, 1100 – 1600 AD: some considerations in an east-west perspective’ (Joanita Vroom).

About the Editors
Simon Kaner is Executive Director of the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures where he is also Head of the Centre for Archaeology and Heritage, and Director of the Centre for Japanese Studies at the University of East Anglia. His publications include The Power of Dogu: Ceramic Figures from Ancient Japan and An Illustrated Companion to Japanese Archaeology.

Brian Ayers served as Honorary Secretary of the Society of Antiquaries of London, and Chief Executive of the Butrint Foundation and County Archaeologist for Norfolk. A specialist in medieval urban archaeology, his publications include Norwich: A Fine City and The German Ocean: Medieval Europe around the North Sea.

Richard Pearson is Emeritus Professor of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia and Senior Research Adviser to the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures. His publications include Ancient Ryukyu: An Archaeological Study of Island Communities and Ōsaka Archaeology.

Oscar Wrenn is Academic Associate at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures.
NEW: Studies in Archaeometry Proceedings of the Archaeometry Symposium at NORM 2019, June 16-19, Portland, Oregon, Portland State University. Dedicated to the Rev. H. Richard Rutherford, C.S.C., Ph.D edited by Mario Ramírez Galán and Ronda Sandifer Bard. Paperback; 203x276mm; 276 pages; illustrated throughout in colour. 120 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697346. £46.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697339. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume is in honor of the American scholar Rev. H. Richard Rutherford, C.S.C, Ph.D (University of Portland). It contains the papers presented at the Archaeometry Symposium in the 74th Northwest Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society (NORM) which took place in Portland (Oregon), June 18th 2019, covering a wide range of topics. The volume includes papers about the application of different techniques in archaeology in order to comprehend some aspects during and after the excavation, for instance, physics, chemical analysis, remote sensing, LiDAR, etc. This work compiles papers about sites from different places around of the world, Spain, Canada, Thailand, Lithuania or Russia.

The aim of the symposium was to facilitate communication between scholars from different places, to present current work in the field, and to stimulate future research.

About the Editors
Mario Ramírez Galán, PhD., is Adjunct Professor in archaeology at the University of Portland (Portland, Oregon) and PhD. in archaeology from the UAH (Alcalá de Henares, Madrid). He has participated in international and Spanish congresses and roundtable sessions. He has participated in several archaeological excavations in the United States in collaboration with the city of Salem (Oregon) to study several aspects of its cultural heritage. Furthermore, he worked at different Spanish archaeological projects, for instance, the battle of Baecula or Complutum. Additionally, he has published papers in some of the most important journals (Archaeometry and Archaeological Prospection), and also books about battlefield archaeology, landscape archaeology, new technologies applied to archaeology, and archaeometry. During the last years, his investigation has been focused on the application of different techniques to study the medieval siege of Alcalá la Vieja. Ronda Sandifer Bard, PhD., is Lecturer in Chemistry at the University of Portland (Portland, Oregon). Her research interests include carbanion chemistry, polymer-bound reactive intermediates, and archaeometry, particularly XRF analysis of metal and bone artifacts. Since 2014, she has helped lead the annual UP Pollentia Undergraduate Research Expedition at the ancient Roman city of Pollentia in Mallorca, Spain, where UP faculty-student teams work at the invitation of the Consortium of the Roman City of Pollentia and its Directors and in collaboration with the Pollentia Field School associated with the University of Barcelona.
FORTHCOMING: Animal Husbandry and Hunting in the Central and Western Balkans Through Time edited by Nemanja Marković and Jelena Bulatović. Paperback; 205x290mm; 198 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Print RRP: £35.00. 687 2020. ISBN 9781789696936. Book contents pageBuy Now

Herding and hunting, along with farming, represented the economic basis of subsistence of communities in the past. The strategies of animal husbandry and hunting were diverse and different between communities, whilst they also changed over time. The differences and variations were sometimes caused by local or regional environmental conditions, but were also the result of social, cultural, political, and even religious factors.

Animal Husbandry and Hunting in the Central and Western Balkans Through Time brings new results of research on animal herding and hunting in the central and western Balkans during prehistoric and historic periods. The investigations presented here cover a wide range of topics related to animal exploitation strategies; they range from broad syntheses to specific case studies and, moreover, include interdisciplinary studies that use zooarchaeological and historical data, iconographic representations and modern laboratory analysis.

About the Editors
Nemanja Marković is a research associate, zooarchaeologist at the Institute of Archaeology, Belgrade (Serbia). The focus of his research is the reconstruction of past human-animal relationships, mainly in the field of animal economy, strategies in animal husbandry and palaeopathology. ;

Jelena Bulatović is a research associate at the Laboratory for Bioarchaeology, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade (Serbia). Her research interests focus on zooarchaeology, studying human-animal interrelationships in the central and western Balkans from the Early Neolithic to the Late Iron Age.
FORTHCOMING: Pious Pilgrims, Discerning Travellers, Curious Tourists: Changing Patterns of Travel to the Middle East from Medieval to Modern Times edited by Paul and Janet Starkey. Paperback; 160x230mm; 422 pages; Illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (91 pages in colour). Print RRP: £55.00.. 686 2020. ISBN 9781789697520. Book contents pageBuy Now

Pious Pilgrims, Discerning Travellers, Curious Tourists: Changing patterns of travel to the Middle East from medieval to modern times comprises a varied collection of seventeen papers presented at the biennial conference of the Association for the Study of Travel in Egypt and the Near East (ASTENE) held in York in July 2019, which together will provide the reader with a fascinating introduction to travel in and to the Middle East over more than a thousand years.

As in previous ASTENE volumes, the material presented ranges widely, from Ancient Egyptian sites through medieval pilgrims to tourists and other travellers of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The papers embody a number of different traditions, including not only actual but also fictional travel experiences, as well as pilgrimage or missionary narratives reflecting quests for spiritual wisdom as well as geographical knowledge. They also reflect the shifting political and cultural relations between Europe and the Near and Middle East, and between the different religions of the area, as seen and described by travellers both from within and from outside the region over the centuries. The men and women travellers discussed travelled for a wide variety of reasons — religious, commercial, military, diplomatic, or sometimes even just for a holiday! — but whatever their primary motivations, they were almost always also inspired by a sense of curiosity about peoples and places less familiar than their own. By recording their experiences, whether in words or in art, they have greatly contributed to our understanding of what has shaped the world we live in. As Ibn Battuta, one of the greatest of medieval Arab travellers, wrote: ‘Travelling — it leaves you speechless, then turns you into a storyteller!’

Table of Contents (provisional)
Introduction – Paul and Janet Starkey ;
1. Pilgrimage as Travel – Jacke Phillips ;
2. Ibn Jubayr’s Riḥla Reconsidered – Paul Starkey ;
3. ‘Gardens of Paradise’ – Janet Starkey ;
4. ‘Wady Ghrásheca’: an unknown Christian site in Sir Gardner Wilkinson’s unpublished manuscripts from the Eastern Desert – Jan Ciglenečki & Blaž Zabel ;
5. Exploring the Ottoman Empire: the travels of Peter Mundy (1597–c.1667) in Turkey 1617–1620 – Jennifer Scarce ;
6. With a radius most accurately divided into 10,000 parts: John Greaves and his scientific survey of Egypt in 1638–1639 – Ronald E. Zitterkopf ;
7. Dimitrie Cantemir, the ‘Orpheus of the Turkish Empire’ (1673– 1723) – Cristina Erck ;
8. The Artist William Page (1794–1872) and his travels in Greece and western Turkey in the first half of the nineteenth century – Brian J. Taylor ;
9. Jacob Röser: a Bavarian physician travelling the Ottoman Empire in 1834–1835 – Joachim Gierlichs ;
10. Publishing with ‘Modern Taste and Spirit’ – Paulina Banas ;
11. ‘Mr and Mrs Smith of England’: a tour to Petra and east of Jordan in 1865 – David Kennedy ;
12. Anton Prokesch-Osten Jr (1837–1919) – Angela Blaschek ;
13. William Wing Loring, George Brinton McClellan and Ulysses S. Grant: American Civil War Generals in Egypt during the 1870s – Mladen Tomorad ;
14. Consular Agents and Foreign Travellers in Upper Egypt in the Nineteenth Century – Terence Walz ;
15. A Luxor Room with a View at Pagnon’s Hotels – Sylvie Weens ;
16. Richard A. Bermann, the Desert and the Mahdi: an Austrian writer’s fascination with Egypt and the Sudan – Ernst Czerny ;
17. Unlawful Acts and Supernatural Curses: the fictional traveller in Bram Stoker’s The Jewel of Seven Stars (1903) – Rebecca Bruce ;
Notes on Contributors ;
Index
FORTHCOMING: The Urbanisation of the North-Western Provinces of the Roman Empire A Juridical and Functional Approach to Town Life in Roman Gaul, Germania Inferior and Britain by Frida Pellegrino. Paperback; 205x290mm; 314 pages; 164 figures (83 pages in colour). Print RRP: £48.00. 685 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 72. ISBN 9781789697742. Buy Now

The Urbanisation of the North-Western Provinces of the Roman Empire investigates the development of urbanism in the north-western provinces of the Roman empire. Key themes include the continuities and discontinuities between pre-Roman and Roman ‘urban’ systems, the relationships between cities’ juridical statuses and their levels of monumentality, levels of connectivity and economic integration as illuminated by the geographical distribution of cities and town-like settlements belonging to various size brackets, and the shapes and nature of regional urban hierarchies, as reconstructed on the basis of not only the administrative centres but - crucially - all places that fulfilled urban ‘functions’.

About the Author
Frida Pellegrino graduated with honours in 2008, after completing a BA course in Archaeology at the University of Padua. She then enrolled in the MA course at the University of Padua and spent a year abroad, studying at Southampton University (UK), with the Erasmus project. She graduated summa cum laude in 2011, specialising in Roman archaeology. She completed her PhD at the University of Leiden in 2018.

Table of Contents (provisional)
Acknowledgements ;
Introduction . The study of the urbanisation of the North-Western provinces ;
Chapter 1: Object and Aims ;
Chapter 2: The Dawn of Urbanism ;
Chapter 3: The Integration of the North-Western Provinces into the Roman Empire ;
Chapter 4: The Self-Governing Cities: Elements and Rhythms of Urbanisation ;
Chapter 5: The Secondary Agglomerations of Gaul ;
Chapter 6: The Secondary Agglomerations of Germania Inferior and Britannia ;
Conclusions ;
Summary ;
Appendix A: List of Civitates in the North-western Provinces and Their Juridical Status and Dating (either Date or Reign) ;
Appendix B: Assured Magistrates of the North-Western Provinces ;
Appendix C: The Settlements of the North-Western Provinces ;
Bibliography