​​ We use cookies to enhance your experience on our site. By continuing to use the site you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy & Cookies.​

 
Archaeopress logo
Archaeopress Publishing Ltd, Summertown Pavilion, 18-24 Middle Way, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7LG, England
tel +44 (0) 1865 311914 fax +44 (0) 1865 512231   email: info@archaeopress.com
Monthly AP Alert - join our mailing list today Archaeopress on Facebook Archaeopress on Twitter Archaeopress on Linked In Archaeopress Blog
Home  
|
  Browse by Subject  
|
  Browse by Series  
|
  Catalogues  
|
  Join Our Mailing List  
|
  Visit Our Blog  
|
  Login (Private Customers)  
|
  Login (Institutional Subscriptions)  
|
  View Basket

Search

title, author, ISBN, keyword

Browse for books in the following languages

ARCHAEOPRESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ACCESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ARCHAEOPRESS JOURNALS
DISTRIBUTED
PUBLISHERS
DIGITAL EDITIONS
OPEN ACCESS PLATFORM
Ordering Information
About Us
Publish With Us
Standing Orders
Trade Sales
Contact Us
Request Review Copy
 
Archaeopress: Publishers of Academic Archaeology
Communicating the research of thousands of archaeologists worldwide since 1991

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in academic archaeology.
 
 
NEW: Composite Artefacts in the Ancient Near East Exhibiting an imaginative materiality, showing a genealogical nature edited by Silvana Di Paolo. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+96 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (19 colour plates). 424 2018 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 3. ISBN 9781784918538. £24.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Composite Artefacts in the Ancient Near East: Exhibiting an imaginative materiality, showing a genealogical nature examines the complex relationship between environment, materials, society and materiality with particular reference to the composite artefacts in the ancient Near East. On the one hand are the objective and natural attributes of materials, possibly exalted from their transformation: a form of fascination immanent in all kind of technical activity which promotes the transition from the ordinary into an ‘extra-ordinary’ realm, imbuing the object with new meaning. On the other hand is the idea that properties of materials are not fixed attributes of ‘matters’, but are processual as well as relational: the qualities of artefacts are subjective and are included in the worldview of artisans making them, as well as in the mind of who observes who appreciate them. Thus, the craftsmanship is oriented towards the achievement of sophisticated products through assemblage techniques and the blending of contrasting properties and qualities of materials. The term ‘composite’ is a combination of the power of technology and the ability to form new images: the strict relationship between creativity, technology and manufacture produces novel interactions and solutions.

Although the primary concern of this volume is to provide specific case studies in which theoretical assumptions and hypotheses can be applied to the ancient evidence, most of the papers take not only the general perspective, such as the relationship between materials and humans, but also a defined body of evidence – material, textual and visual through which they address the issue. This volume represents a first attempt to conceptualise the construction and use of composite artefacts: the richness of approaches, the development of new issues depending on specific case studies, and the overturning of widely accepted ideas, show the interest towards this category of objects and the opportunity to enlarge this field study in the future.

About the Editor
SILVANA DI PAOLO (PhD Rome 2001) is, since 2001, researcher at the Institute for Studies of Ancient Mediterranean of the Italian National Council of Research (CNR). She is the director of the Series Biblioteca di Antichità Cipriote, scientific board member of al-Sharq (published in Paris) and editorial board member of Rivista di Studi Fenici published by ISMA. As CNR researcher she is co-coordinator of different projects in collaboration with European and non-European foreign institutions. She is a co-director of the QANATES project in the Iranian Kurdistan. She has written extensively on the relationship between art and power, location and styles of workshops, social meaning of works of art, as well as on material culture of the 2nd millennium BC. Silvana is currently working on the concepts of similarity in assemblages of artifacts and routinisation of the artisanal production in the ANE, as well as on the applications of the shape and semantic analysis on Mesopotamian glyptics.

NEW: Unearthing Alexandria’s Archaeology: The Italian Contribution by Mohamed Kenawi and Giorgia Marchiori. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+194 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (81 colour plates). 423 2018. ISBN 9781784918651. £38.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Unearthing Alexandria’s Archaeology: The Italian Contribution contains the results of an archival survey, historical research, and archaeological description of the main Italian excavations in Alexandria from the 1890s to the 1950s. The Italian archaeological investigations in the city of Alexandria are presented through unpublished photographs of Evaristo Breccia, Achille Adriani, and some of the glass negatives of the Graeco- Roman Museum of Alexandria.

Various Italians contributed to the fieldwork and the production of drawings and plans, and documenting the majority of the most important sites in Alexandria, on which our archaeological knowledge today is based. But their names have been forgotten compared with Giuseppe Botti, Breccia, and Adriani: Giacomo Biondi, Gino Beghé, Antonio Gentili, Giuseppe Ramacciotti, Mariano Bartocci, Giovanni Dattari, Despina Sinadino, Michele Salvago, Orazio Abate, and Giovanni Peruto. The book gives detailed descriptions of the Italian excavations at Hadra, Chatby, Anfushi, Kom al-Chougafa, the Serapeum, and Kom al-Dikka, accompanied by often unpublished photographs and followed by a catalogue of other rare photographs of different archaeological sites in Alexandria.

About the Authors
MOHAMED KENAWI was Head Researcher (2011–16), followed by Acting Director (2016–17), of the Hellenistic Centre of Bibliotheca Alexandrina, Alexandria. He taught at the American University in Cairo and at Catania University. He has participated in various archaeological missions in Libya, Italy, and Egypt, among them those at Kom al-Ahmer/Kom Wasit, Athribis, and Dionysias. He currently collaborates on projects with Padua University, the City University of New York, and Tübingen University. At present, he is a Researcher and Training Manager at the School of Archaeology, University of Oxford, for the Endangered Archaeology of the Middle East and North Africa project. He has published many articles about his research in the Delta and Fayoum, in addition to his monograph, Alexandria’s Hinterland: Archaeology of the Western Nile Delta, Egypt (2014). He is Egypt Coordinator for the Manar al-Athar open-access photo-archive www.manar-al-athar.ox.ac.uk.

GIORGIA MARCHIORI has worked on a number of archaeological projects in Egypt: the Tell Timai Project of the University of Hawaii, the Dionsyais Archaeological Project of the Siena University, and the Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit Archaeological Project of Padova University and the Centro Archeologico Italo-Egiziano. She has also worked on archaeological expeditions in Mexico. Having completed an MSc in GIS and Spatial Analysis in Archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, she is currently doing her PhD at Durham University on late Roman housing in the Western Nile Delta.
NEW: Cycladic Archaeology and Research: New Approaches and Discoveries edited by Erica Angliker and John Tully. 298pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 417 2018. ISBN 9781784918095. £50.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Cycladic Archaeology and Research: New approaches and discoveries reflects the present exciting times in Cycladic archaeology. New excavations are bringing to light sanctuaries unmentioned by literary sources and inscriptions (e.g., Kythnos, Despotiko); new theoretical approaches to insularity and networks are radically changing our views of the Cyclades as geographic and cultural unit(s). Furthermore, the restoration and restudy of older sites (e.g., Delos, Paros, Naxos) are challenging old truths, updating chronologies and contexts throughout the Mediterranean and beyond. This volume is intended to share these recent developments with a broader, international audience. The essays have been carefully selected as representing some of the most important recent work and include significant previously-unpublished material. Individually, they cover archaeological sites and materials from across the Cycladic islands, and illustrate the diversity of the islands’ material culture across the Geometric, Archaic, Classical, Hellenistic, Roman, and Late Antique periods. Together, they share common themes such as the importance of connectivity, and the role of each island’s individual landscape and its resources in shaping human activity. The work they represent attests the ongoing appeal of the islands and of the islanders in the collective imagination, and demonstrates the scope for still further innovative work in the years ahead.

About the Editors
ERICA ANGLIKER is a PhD student at the University of Zurich, where she is preparing the publication of her monograph on the cults and sanctuaries of the Cycladic islands. She has published on the culture and religion of the Cyclades and is a member of the scientific team at the excavations of the sanctuary of Despotiko, where she has been digging since 2012. Her research focuses on Greek cults and religions in the public and private sphere, from the Geometric to the Hellenistic era. Her special interests include cults practised at natural sites or involving natural elements, as well as topics in island studies, such as insularity, socioeconomic networks, and maritime travel logs.

JOHN TULLY studied Greats at the University of Oxford before writing his doctoral dissertation on the Hellenistic Cyclades at Harvard and Princeton. He is now a principal at Delivery Associates, where he helps governments improve the lives of citizens.
NEW: Estudios para la configuración de las facies cerámicas altoimperiales en el Sur de la Península Ibérica edited by P. Ruiz Montes, Ma. V. Peinado Espinosa and Ma. I. Fernández García. Paperback; 210x297mm; ii+284 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (68 colour plates). Spanish text throughout. 403 2018 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 11. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918118. £39.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918125. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £39.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Estudios para la configuración de las facies cerámicas altoimperiales en el Sur de la Península Ibérica explores economy and trade in the south of the Iberian peninsula during the High Roman Empire. Different methodologies, techniques and approaches to archaeological research are applied in the analysis and study of ceramic contexts in several marketplaces or consumption centres in the area. Special attention is given to ceramic facies predominantly characterised by the presence of fine pottery. In addition, the examination of local ceramics points towards a complexity whose interpretation has been biased until a few decades ago by the presence of wares imported from other Mediterranean regions as a result of the intensity of Roman trade. Furthermore, exploration beyond traditional analytical parameters highlights, for example, the relevance of the phenomenon of pottery vessel imitation.

About the Editors
DR PABLO RUIZ MONTES has a doctorate in History from the University of Granada and is a postdoctoral researcher linked to the Department of Prehistory and Archaeology at the University of Granada. His research focuses on the analysis of ceramic facies of Roman times in the Baetica province, and on the study of technology traditions and production processes, particularly in Red Slip wares, in the Western Roman world. Also, in past years, he has developed his research in Italy, at the University of Siena and in archaeological sites such as the Roman colony of Cosa (Ansedonia).

DR Mª VICTORIA PEINADO ESPINOSA has a doctorate in History from the University of Granada. She has worked as associate researcher for both the University of Granada and the University of Perugia. Her line of research has focused on the analysis of the material culture in Roman times, especially common ware pottery. Her works have contributed to better understand these ceramics both in the South of the Iberian Peninsula and in Central Italy. Currently, she combines teaching with archaeological research, and she is involved in several projects studying the Roman Baetica.

DR Mª ISABEL FERNÁNDEZ GARCÍA is Professor of Archeology at the Department of Prehistory and Archeology at the University of Granada. One of her main areas of expertise and focus of her research is the analysis of the production and marketing structures in pottery workshops from Roman times, with special emphasis in the Baetica province. She is a specialist in pottery productions in Hispanic terra sigillata.
NEW: Atlas of Ceramic Fabrics 1 Italy: North-East, Adriatic, Ionian. Bronze Age: Impasto by Valentina Cannavò and Sara Tiziana Levi. Paperback; 175x245mm; viii+142 pages; 25 figures, 16 tables and 16 colour plate section containing 167 illustrations. 427 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918590. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918606. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £29.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Atlas Of Ceramic Fabrics 1. Italy: North-East, Adriatic, Ionian. Bronze Age: Impasto presents and interprets the petrographic composition of Bronze Age Impasto pottery (23rd-10th centuries BCE) found in the eastern part of Italy. This is the first of a series of Atlases organised according to geographical areas, chronology and types of wares. In this book 935 samples from 63 sites are included, which comprise material obtained as a result of almost 30 years of interdisciplinary archaeological, technological and archaeometric research by the authors’ team. 73 petrographic fabrics (the potters’ ‘recipes’) are defined and presented, on their lithological character – a tool that can be used to compare the different components of the ceramic pastes and to check provenance of non-local pots.

The volume is organised in chapters focused on methodology, fabric description and distribution, followed by the archaeological implications and the database, with contributions by Daniele Brunelli and Andrea Di Renzoni. Illustrations and descriptions of the fabrics and a complete list of the samples are included in order to provide a rigorous and transparent presentation of the data. The archaeological implications are discussed within the topics such as technology, variability, standardisation, chronology, function, social organisation, circulation, style, typology and cultural identity. It is hoped that this work will be considered as another stepping-stone in demostrating that, in archaeology, technological variability is as important as morphological and stylistic distinctions.

About the Authors
VALENTINA CANNAVÓ’S research focuses on the archaeometric investigation of ancient pottery. She is a research fellow at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia where she obtained a PhD in archaeological science (2010). Valentina teaches pottery technology (Ferrara University) and applied geoarchaeology (Modena and Reggio Emilia University) to the graduate students. She is in charge of the database of prehistoric pottery and since 2009 she has been the director of the field laboratory of the excavation at San Vincenzo Stromboli (Aeolian Islands).

SARA T. LEVI’S research focuses on the ancient pottery through an integrated archaeological, technological and archaeometric approach, and on the Bronze Age of central Mediterranean. She obtained a PhD in archaeology at Sapienza University in Rome (1996). Her findings have been published in several scientific journals and books, including a volume on the Italo- Mycenaean pottery (2014). Since 2015 she has been teaching archaeology at Hunter College in New York, after spending eight years at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia as professor of archaeological methodology. Since 2009 she leads the interdisciplinary archaeological investigations at San Vincenzo Stromboli (Aeolian Islands) and at Cannatello (Agrigento). Both projects hold international field schools for students as well.
NEW: Buildings in Society: International Studies in the Historic Era edited by Liz Thomas and Jill Campbell. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+150 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (36 colour plates). 426 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918316. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918323. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Buildings in Society: International Studies in the Historic Era presents a series of papers reflecting the latest approaches to the study of buildings from the historic period. This volume does not examine buildings as architecture, but adopts an archaeological perspective to consider them as artefacts, reflecting the needs of those who commissioned them. Studies have often failed to consider the historical contexts in which the buildings were constructed and how they were subsequently used and interpreted. The papers in this volume situate their interpretation in their social context. Buildings can inform us about past cultures as they are responsive and evolve to meet people’s needs over time.

The buildings examined in this volume range from the twelfth to the twenty-first century and cross continents including case-studies from America, Australia and Europe, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Scandinavia and the Mediterranean. Themes include: Approaches to the study of buildings, Buildings of Power, Buildings in Identity, Domestic Space and Urban and Village Spaces. The essays consider building design, role, and how the buildings were altered as their function changed to coincide with the needs and aspirations of those who owned or used the buildings. This collection of papers emphasizes the need for further international multidisciplinary approaches including archaeology, architectural history and art history in order to understand how ideas, styles, approaches and designs spread over time and space. Together, these papers generate valuable new insights into the study of buildings in the historic period.

About the Editors
LIZ THOMAS is a historical-archaeologist and heritage and cultural researcher based at the School of Natural and Built Environment, The Queen’s University of Belfast. She recently completed her British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship, a multidisciplinary study that focused on the docklands of Belfast, Northern Ireland. She specialises in the study of institutions, in particular won policymaking, political environments and human agency. Thomas’ current research is based on Public Heritage.

JILL CAMPBELL is a skilled buildings archaeologist. She has conducted fieldwork in Northern Ireland, England and Scotland and has produced architectural histories for the Northern Ireland Environment Agency. Dr Campbell has several published papers, and has contributed a chapter on medieval manor houses to the Oxford Handbook of Later Medieval Archaeology.
NEW: Naturvorstellungen im Altertum Schilderungen und Darstellungen von Natur im Alten Orient und in der griechischen Antike edited by Florian Schimpf, Dominik Berrens, Katharina Hillenbrand, Tim Brandes and Carrie Schidlo. ii+285 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (56 colour plates). German text. 411 2018. ISBN 9781784918255. £32.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Everyone who investigates pre-modern concepts of nature cannot avoid a critical reflection on the ancient understandings of it. Here, “nature” is understood in the sense of a seemingly untouched space, largely independent of human culture. While this concept of “nature” is prevalent in modern times, the reconstruction of ancient ideas is difficult in that concepts of nature, if at all present, emphasize other aspects. For example, the Greek term φύσις in pre-Hellenistic times defines the nature of a thing rather than an untouched environment. A word for “nature” in this sense has not been handed down to us in the remaining texts of the Ancient Near East and Classical Antiquity. Nevertheless, such concepts can certainly be reconstructed from descriptions of nature to be found in literature and the representations of natural elements in art.

The present volume aims at identifying these concepts of nature in texts as well as in archaeological remains of the Ancient Near Eastern and the Greek culture from the Archaic to the Hellenistic period. Contributions from the fields of archaeology and philology are juxtaposed for each time period in chronological order. This arrangement provides a good overview of the concepts of nature prevailing throughout different period and cultures.

GERMAN DESCRIPTION: Der Begriff „Natur“ wird in modernen, mitteleuropäischen Gesellschaften meist im Sinne eines vermeintlich unberührten Raumes verstanden, der weitgehend unbeeinflusst von menschlicher Kultur ist. Für vormoderne Kulturen lassen sich solche Vorstellungen bzw. Konzepte sehr viel schwieriger nachweisen, da beispielsweise ein Wort für „Natur“ mit der eben genannten Bedeutung in den erhaltenen Texten des Alten Orients und der griechischen Antike so nicht überliefert zu sein scheint. Gleichwohl werden durchaus Naturelemente in der antiken Literatur, der Flächenkunst sowie in antiken Monumenten beschrieben bzw. abgebildet sowie als integrative Bestandteile genutzt und funktionalisiert. Daraus lassen sich Konzepte von „Natur“ herausarbeiten und rekonstruieren. Der vorliegende Band möchte solche „Naturkonzepte“ in Texten, Artefakten und Denkmälern des Alten Orients und des griechischen Kulturraumes von der Archaik bis in den Hellenismus identifizieren und einen Überblick über die jeweils in einem bestimmten Zeit- und Kulturraum vorherrschenden Vorstellungen sowie deren diachrone Entwicklung geben.

About the Editors
FLORIAN SCHIMPF studied Classical Archaeology and History at the universities of Frankfurt and Istanbul, whilst gaining practical experiences by participating in excavations in Priene (Turkey), Portugal and on the Balkans. In 2013 he joined the Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature” at the University of Mainz with a project on natural sanctuaries in ancient Greece and Asia Minor. His research interests lie in the fields of religious history, Greek cult practices and metrology.

DOMINIK BERRENS studied Classical Philology and Biology at the University of Freiburg. From 2013-2017 he was part of the Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature” at the University of Mainz, where he received his doctorate with a dissertation on social insects in antiquity in 2016. Since October 2017 he has been a postdoctoral researcher working on the project “NOSCEMUS – Nova Scientia: Early Modern Science and Latin” funded by the European Research Council at the University of Innsbruck. His research interests lie in pre-modern scientific texts and ancient drama.

KATHARINA HILLENBRAND studied Classical Philology and German Studies at the Universities of Würzburg and Frankfurt. In 2014 she joined the Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature” at the University of Mainz with a project on concepts of volcanic phenomena in Roman antiquity. Currently she is working at the department of Classical Philology at the University o
NEW: Identified skeletal collections: the testing ground of anthropology? by Charlotte Yvette Henderson and Francisca Alves Cardoso. 428 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918057. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918064. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Human skeletons are widely studied in archaeological, anthropological and forensic settings to learn about the deceased. Methods used to identify individuals in forensic contexts and to determine age and sex in archaeological settings are normally tested on identified skeletal collections: collections of skeletons with known age-at-death, sex, often occupation and cause of death. These collections often represent individuals dying within the last century, but this is variable and often depends on the purpose for creating the collection. Many were developed in attempts to understand local population biology whereas those collected recently are for forensic purposes: to improve identification in legal contexts. Some of these collections were developed from body donation programmes, while others have come from cemeteries: cemeteries which were either no longer viable or needed clearing. All these factors impact on who curates these collections: archaeology or anthropology departments and museums. However, unlike many other skeletons curated in these locations, these are individuals with names. All this raises ethical questions about their creation, curation and their use for research.

This book focusses on identified skeletal collections in the UK, Portugal, South Africa, USA and Canada. The chapters discuss how and why collections were amassed including the local legislation governing them. Alongside this run the ethical issues associated with their collection, curation and access to them. The demographics of the collections: who is included and why, along with such biases and how they can impact on research are also discussed, as are limitations in the documentary data associated with these individuals. The importance of these collections is also focussed on: particularly their role in developing and testing methods for age determination in adults. This shows why these collections are so vital to improve methods and interpretations for archaeological and forensic research. The importance of communicating this to the wider public is also addressed.

About the Editors CHARLOTTE HENDERSON is a researcher in CIAS – Research Centre for Anthropology and Health based in the Department of Life Sciences, Coimbra (Portugal). She completed her PhD at the University of Durham in the Department of Archaeology. Her research focusses on methods for identifying activity in past populations. She has a long-standing interest in ethics which she studied as part of her undergraduate degree in Philosophy.

FRANCISCA ALVES CARDOSO is a research fellow at CRIA – Centre for Research in Anthropology (Portugal). In 2008 she was awarded a PhD in Biological Anthropology/Paleopathology by the University of Durham (UK). Her research focuses on the significance of socio-economic and cultural variables in the interpretation of human skeletons. In 2014 she was awarded a grant to develop the project - Portuguese Human Identified Skeletal Collections (HISC): Shaping their ethical and legal framework, which aims to build a bridge between science and society on the importance of HISC, whilst considering their scientific value, social and cultural, as well as ethical implications.
NEW: From the Archaeological Record to Virtual Reconstruction The Application of Information Technologies at an Iron Age Fortified Settlement (San Chuis Hillfort, Allande, Asturias, Spain) by Juana Molina Salido. x+190 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (126 colour plates). 425 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918750. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918767. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

From the Archaeological Record to Virtual Reconstruction describes the use of New Information Technologies (IT) for the analyses and interpretation of archaeological record of the San Chuis Hillfort (San Martín de Beduledo, Allande, Asturias, Spain). The data gathered during the eight excavation campaigns conducted by Francisco Jordá Cerdá in the sixties and eighties of the 20th century was mechanised and digitalised. Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) of the hillfort was performed, followed by a creation of spatial analysis through the establishment of relations between the elements of the archaeological record. At the end, having studied and investigated the site’s urban evolution throughout its occupation period (890 cal. BP – 530 cal. AD), a virtual reconstruction of the hillfort in its different settlement phases, presenting various evolution scenarios is presented.

In the process a work methodology and a set of computer applications adapted for each step of this research have been established, such as the system for the insertion of records in a database, for planimetry drawings, hillfort virtualisation, and others.

About the Author Juana Molina Salido obtained a PhD in prehistory and archaeology. She has a long experience as an archaeologist, specialising in the application of New Information Technologies in the development of archaeological work, both in the field and in the cabinet. In addition, she is a technical specialist in heritage virtualisation. She is currently collaborating on several research projects at the UNED, the Middle Palaeolithic site of Jarama VI and on the hillfort that is the subject of this book.
NEW: London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 by John Schofield, Lyn Blackmore and Jacqui Pearce, with Tony Dyson. Hardback; 210x297mm; xxiv+514 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (132 colour plates). English text with summaries in French and German. 422 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918378. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918385. Book contents pageDownload

London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 presents and celebrates the mile-long Thames Street in the City of London and the land south of it to the River Thames as an archaeological asset. The argument is based on the reporting of four excavations of 1974–84 by the Museum of London near the north end of London Bridge: Swan Lane, Seal House, New Fresh Wharf and Billingsgate Lorry Park. Here the findings of the period 1100–1666 are presented.

Buildings and property development on sixteen properties south of Thames Street, on land reclaimed in many stages since the opening of the 12th century, include part of the parish church of St Botolph Billingsgate. The many units of land reclamation are dated by dendrochronology, coins and documents. They have produced thousands of artefacts and several hundred kilos of native and foreign pottery. Much of this artefactual material has been published, but in catalogue form (shoes, knives, horse fittings, dress accessories, textiles, household equipment). Now the context of these finds, their deposition in groups, is laid out for the first time. Highlights of the publication include the first academic analysis and assessment of a 13th- or 14th-century trumpet from Billingsgate, the earliest surviving straight trumpet in Europe; many pilgrim souvenirs; analysis of two drains of the 17th century from which suggestions can be made about use of rooms and spaces within documented buildings; and the proposal that one of the skeletons excavated from St Botolph’s church is John Reynewell, mayor of London in 1426–7 and a notable figure in London’s medieval history.

The whole publication encourages students and other researchers of all kinds to conduct further research on any aspect of the sites and their very rich artefactual material, which is held at the Museum of London’s Archaeological Archive. This is a significantly large and varied dataset for the archaeology and history of London in the period 1100 to 1666 which can be continuously interrogated for generations to come.

About the Authors
JOHN SCHOFIELD was an archaeologist at the Museum of London from 1974 to 2008. He has written several well-received books on the archaeology of London and of British medieval towns; and as Cathedral Archaeologist for St Paul’s Cathedral, archaeological accounts of the medieval and Wren buildings.

LYN BLACKMORE is a Senior Ceramics and Finds Specialist who has worked for MOLA and its predecessors since 1986. During this time she has established the Anglo-Saxon fabric type series for London, has contributed to the Type-Series of London Medieval Pottery and has published widely on aspects of post- Roman pottery. Her special research interests are the development of London and the role of local, regional and imported pottery and finds in trade and exchange. In 2009–14 she was Assistant Treasurer of the Medieval Pottery Research Group and in 2017 was elected co-editor of its journal Medieval Ceramics, a role she first held in 1989–94.

JACQUI PEARCE is a Senior Ceramics Specialist with MOLA, focusing especially on medieval and later pottery, on which she has published widely. She joined the Museum of London’s Department of Urban Archaeology in 1977 and has played a major role in the development and publication of the Type-Series of London Medieval Pottery. She has served as Joint Editor of Medieval Ceramics, as well as of Post-Medieval Archaeology and is currently Joint Editor of English Ceramic Circle Transactions. In 2017 she was elected President of the Society for Post-Medieval Archaeology.

TONY DYSON was the principal documentary historian and general editor at the Department of Urban Archaeology of the Museum of London from 1974 to 1998.
NEW: Special Place, Interesting Times: The island of Palagruža and transitional periods in Adriatic prehistory by Stašo Forenbaher with contributions by Zlatko Perhoč and Robert H. Tykot. x+194 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (60 colour plates). 421 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918491. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918507. Book contents pageDownload

While one might say that the prehistory of the Adriatic was always in transition, the rhythm of change was not always the same. On several occasions, a series of changes over a relatively short time period resulted in dramatic transformations. Three crucial episodes of change marked the later Adriatic prehistory. The first one, which took place around year 6000 BC, was a transformation of subsistence strategy, transition from hunting and gathering to farming. The second one was a social transformation that played out in the third millennium BC, when for the first time the power of individuals was clearly expressed by material culture. The third episode, inclusion into the classic Mediterranean civilization, coincided with the end of prehistory in the Adriatic region.

During all of those episodes, travel and connectivity with distant lands played an exceptionally important role, and certain places gained particular importance due to their unique geographic location. Palagruža is among the most prominent such places, its importance being out of all proportion to its physical size. Adriatic prehistory cannot be told without mentioning Palagruža, and prehistory of Palagruža cannot be understood without knowing Adriatic prehistory. Due to its strategic position in the very center of the Adriatic Sea, due to the mystery born of distance and isolation, due to its wild and spectacular landscape, Palagruža indeed is a special place. A reflection of its specialty is an unexpected abundance of high-grade archaeological evidence, dating precisely from the three aforementioned periods marked by radical change.

About the Author
STAŠO FORENBAHER is Senior Research Advisor at the Institute for Anthropological Research in Zagreb, Croatia. He studied archaeology at the University of Zagreb (Croatia), and received his PhD from the Southern Methodist University in Dallas (TX). His research interests cover Mediterranean Prehistory with a focus on the Adriatic, and include transition to farming, formation of early elites, archaeology of caves, and lithic analysis. He has excavated at many prehistoric stratified cave sites in the eastern Adriatic, including Pupićina Cave in Istria, Vaganačka Cave in Velebit Mountain, Grapčeva Cave on the island of Hvar, and Nakovana Cave on Pelješac Peninsula. His current fieldwork is focussed on the excavation of Vela Cave on the island of Korčula.
NEW: Gifts, Goods and Money: Comparing currency and circulation systems in past societies edited by Dirk Brandherm, Elon Heymans and Daniela Hofmann. vi+228 pages; 73 figures (30 colour plates). 416 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918354. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918361. Book contents pageDownload

The papers gathered in this volume explore the economic and social roles of exchange systems in past societies from a variety of different perspectives. Based on a broad range of individual case studies, the authors tackle problems surrounding the identification of (pre-monetary) currencies in the archaeological record. These concern the part played by weight measurement systems in their development, the changing role of objects as they shift between different spheres of exchange, e.g. from gifts to commodities, as well as wider issues regarding the role of exchange networks as agents of social and economic change. Among the specific questions the papers address is what happens when new objects of value are introduced into a system, or when existing objects go out of use, as well as how exchange systems react to events such as crises or the emergence of new polities and social constellations. One theme that unites most of the papers is the tension between what is introduced from the outside and changes that are driven by social transformations within a given group.

About the Editors
DIRK BRANDHERM studied Archaeology, Classics and Social Anthropology at the universities of Münster, Edinburgh and Freiburg. Most of his work has been in European Bronze and Iron Age archaeology, with one focus on metalwork production and depositional practices. He currently holds a position of Lecturer at Queen’s University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

ELON HEYMANS studied archaeology at the University of Amsterdam and at Tel Aviv University. He completed his PhD in Tel Aviv on the early history of money in the eastern Mediterranean Iron Age, and is currently a postdoctoral researcher at Utrecht University. His focus lies on the archaeology of Greece and the southern Levant, and he is particularly interested in the social, political and historical context of early money use.

DANIELA HOFMANN has obtained her PhD from Cardiff University and is currently Junior Professor at Hamburg University, Germany. She has published extensively on funerary archaeology, as well as the figurines and domestic architecture of the central European Neolithic, but she is also interested in instances of structured deposition and in spheres of exchange.
NEW: Commemorating Conflict: Greek Monuments of the Persian Wars by Xavier Duffy. viii+210 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 10 plates in colour. 412 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918392. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918408. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £26.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This study is concerned with how the Greek peoples, of primarily the classical period, collectively commemorated the Persian Wars. The data presented here are public monuments, which include both physical and behavioural commemorations. The aim of this work is to reveal and present the methods by which Greeks of the fifth century BC commemorated the Persian Wars. Several trends have drawn attention away from studies presenting commemorative practices in their entirety: the focus on singular monument types, individual commemorative places, a particular commemorating group or specific battle, and an overemphasis on Athenian commemorations. This project works towards rectifying this issue by highlighting the variations in commemorative traditions. This holistic approach to the data, which is inclusive in its remit of commemorative objects, places, and groups, allows for a more complete representation of the commemorative tradition. What emerges from this study is the compilation of all known ancient Greek monuments to commemorate the battles of Marathon, Salamis, Artemisium, Thermopylae and Plataea.

About the Author
XAVIER DUFFY graduated with a PhD in the commemoration of ancient Greek warfare in 2016 from the University of Birmingham’s School of Classics, Ancient History and Archaeology. Xavier has taught Classical Archaeology at the University of London and University of Winchester and has a keen interest in material culture. This interest was nurtured while working as Assistant Collections Manager at the British Museum from 2009-2017. This book is the result of Xavier’s postgraduate research on the commemorations of the Persian Wars specifically.

Table of Contents
PREFACE; 1: INTRODUCTION; 2: CONTEXTUALISING THE COMMEMORATIONS OF THE PERSIAN WARS; 3: COMMEMORATIVE GROUPS AND COMMEMORATIVE PLACES; 4: MONUMENTS BY TYPE; 5: THE MONUMENTS AND THE EVIDENCE; BIBLIOGRAPHY
NEW: Life on the Edge: The Neolithic and Bronze Age of Iain Crawford’s Udal, North Uist edited by Beverley Ballin Smith. Hardback; xxxii+270 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. 408 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917708. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917715. Book contents pageDownload

The discovery of archaeological structures in North Uist in 1974 after storm damage led to the identification by Iain Crawford of a kerb cairn complex, with a cist and human remains. Six years later he went back, and over the next three years excavated another cist with human remains in its kerbed cairn, many bowl pits dug into the blown sand, and down to two late Neolithic structures and a ritual complex. He intensively studied the environmental conditions affecting the site and was among the first archaeologists in Scotland to understand the climate changes taking place at the transition between late Neolithic and the early Bronze Age. The deposition of blown sand and the start of the machair in the Western Isles, including the rise in sea-level and inundations into inhabited and farmed landscapes, are all part of the complex story of natural events and human activities.

Radiocarbon dating and modern scientific analyses provide the detail of the story of periods of starvation suffered by the people that were buried on the site, of the movement away of the community, of their attempts of bringing the ‘new’ land back into cultivation, of a temporary tent-like structure, and of marking their territory by the construction of enduring monuments to the dead.

About the Editor
BEVERLEY BALLIN SMITH took up the mantle left by Iain Crawford and has brought this first monograph on his Udal project area to publication. She has extensive experience of working on, and publishing, other large multi-period sites. She is an archaeologist who lived and worked on Orkney for many years and has first-hand experience of the archaeology of Shetland, the UK, Faroes, Denmark, Norway and Sweden, and is now based in Scotland. Beverley is the Publications Manager at GUARD Archaeology Ltd and editor of ARO (Archaeology Reports Online), with the aim of disseminating information to relevant audiences. She undertakes specialist analysis of prehistoric pottery and coarse stone tools. She has been a member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists for nearly all her professional life; she served on the former IfA Council, was Vice Chair for Outreach, a member of the Validation Committee and was a CIfA Board director. She is a member of the Society of Antiquaries of London and also a member of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, where she has been Vice President. She is currently President of Archaeology Scotland and a Research Associate at National Museums Scotland.
NEW: Maryport: A Roman Fort and Its Community by David J. Breeze. vi+116 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (63 plates in colour). 402 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918019. £14.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918026. £10.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £14.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The collection of Roman inscribed stones and sculpture, together with other Roman objects found at Maryport in Cumbria, is the oldest archaeological collection in Britain still in private hands. Today, it is housed in the Senhouse Roman Museum on Sea Brows to the north of the modern town of Maryport. Beside the museum the earthworks of the Roman fort may still be seen, and beyond it, though not visible, lies a large civil settlement revealed through geophysical survey and the scene of two recent excavations. Maryport: A Roman Fort and its community places the collection in context and describes the history of research at the site. Maryport, although at the north-western edge of the Roman Empire, provides material of international importance for our understanding of the Roman state.

About the Author
DAVID BREEZE has been a trustee of the Senhouse Museum Trust since its inception in 1985 and chair of the trust since 2013. He has served as President of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society and as Chairman of the International Congress of Roman Frontier. He was Chief Inspector of Ancient Monuments for Scotland from 1989 to 2005, and subsequently led the team which successfully nominated the Antonine Wall as a World Heritage Site in 2008. David has excavated on both Hadrian’s Wall and the Antonine Wall and written several books on these frontiers, on frontiers elsewhere in the Roman Empire and on the Roman army.
NEW: Axe-heads and Identity An investigation into the roles of imported axe-heads in identity formation in Neolithic Britain by Katharine Walker. xiv+318 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (86 colour plates). 386 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917449. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917456. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The significant body of stone and flint axe-heads imported into Britain from the Continent has been poorly understood, overlooked and undervalued in Neolithic studies, particularly over the past half century. It is proposed, in this study, that the cause is a bias of British Neolithic scholarship against the invasion hypothesis and diffusionist model, and it is sought therefore to re-assess the significance accorded to these objects. The aim is to redress the imbalance by re-focusing on the material, establishing a secure evidence base, and exploring the probable conditions in which these often distinctive items made their way to Britain. The narrative presented here rests upon the argument that imported axe-heads came into what is today called Britain as objects of considerable significance. Specifically, they were items of high symbolic value that played a crucial role in fostering particular ways of thinking about, and addressing, social identity in the Neolithic period. These issues are the context for the study, whose main objectives are the close and detailed cataloguing of relevant material, and a documentation of the investigative work needed to establish the credentials of each artefact.

About the Author
Katharine Walker is a prehistorian who specialises in the Neolithic of northwest Europe. She is Visiting Research Fellow at Bournemouth University, 'Ecademy' Project Officer at the New Forest Centre in Lyndhurst, and a freelance lithics and stone axe specialist. She studied at the Universities of Bristol, Cardiff, and Southampton where she completed a PhD in 2015. Her current research interests focus on materials and material culture, and she has also published on the first metalwork and the origins of social power in The Oxford Handbook of Neolithic Europe (2015). She is an active Committee Member of the Implement Petrology Group, as well as Editor of their newsletter Stonechat.
NEW: KYMISSALA: Archaeology – Education – Sustainability by Manolis I. Stefanakis. xii+192 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English and Greek.. 52 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917685. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917692. Book contents pageDownload

The area of Kymissala on the southwest coast of Rhodes is of great archaeological interest, as it conceals a large number of important archaeological sites belonging to the lesser known ancient deme of the Rhodian countryside, the deme of Kymissaleis. The region is also of exceptional environmental and ecological importance, as it has a particular biodiversity and is protected by the European ‘Natura 2000’ network of nature protection areas.

Kymissala has systematically been researched during the past 10 years by the Kymissala Archaeological Research Project (KARP) inaugurated by the Department of Mediterranean Studies and the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Dodecanese in 2006.

The research, escaping from its narrow academic and archaeological context and exploiting the comparative advantage of the region, may –and should– inter alia, intervene in a mild and sustainable manner in the promotion of the archaeological site of Kymissala. Its ultimate goal is to promote the antiquities of the area, its educational value and its historical and cultural continuity within a protected natural environment, in the context of an ecological-archaeological park.

Under the title Kymissala: Archaeology – Education – Sustainability, fourteen original studies have been published, constituting the first complete presentation of the area of Kymissala and the work in progress, after ten years of systematic research, in terms of Archaeology, Education and Sustainable Development.

About the Author
Manolis I. Stefanakis is an Associate Professor in Classical Archaeology and Numismatics in the Department of Mediterranean Studies, University of the Aegean. Director of Postgraduate Studies in ‘Archaeology of the Eastern Mediterranean from the Prehistoric Era to the Late Antiquity: Greece, Egypt, Near East’.

Director of the University of the Aegean Archaeological Research in Kymissala, Rhodes (held in collaboration with the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Dodecanese) since 2006. Co-director (with Professor Nikolaos Stampolidis) of the University of the Aegean excavation (held in collaboration with the Ephorate of Antiquities of Rethymno) of the fortified citadel of Orne in Retymno, Crete, since 2016.

Co-founder and Publishing Director (with Dr. Nikos Litinas) of the annual scientific journal Eulimene: Studies in Classical Archaeology, Epigraphy, Numismatics and Papyrology, Rethymno: Mediterranean Archaeological Society (ISSN 1108-5800) and of Eulimene Series of Independent Publications, Rethymno: Mediterranean Archaeological Society. Co-founder and Publishing Director (with Assistant Professor Sotiris Ntalis) of the annual scientific journal Yearbook of Mediterranean Studies, Rhodes.

His research interests focus on Field Archaeology, Classical Archaeology, Ancient Greek Numismatics, Archaeology and Sustainability.
NEW: Colecciones, arqueólogos, instituciones y yacimientos en la España de los siglos XVIII al XX edited by Sergio España-Chamorro, Rebeca Arranz Santos, Alberto Romero Molero. xii+246 pages; illustrated throughout in color and black & white (71 colour plates). 50 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918637. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918644. Book contents pageDownload

The History of archaeological research has only recently become a research topic of interest within Spain. A congress, Colecciones, arqueólogos, instituciones y yacimientos en la España de los Siglos XVIII al XX, was held at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in 2016 designed to bring this topic to the fore. Eleven papers are presented in this proceedings volume. They address several aspects from different perspectives that collectively enrich the historiography of Spanish archaeological research.

La Historia de las investigaciones arqueológicas es un campo de estudio muy reciente en el caso español. No obstante, las últimas décadas han sido muy fructíferas en esta línea de investigación. Colecciones, arqueólogos, instituciones y yacimientos en la España de los Siglos XVIII al XX es un volumen que recoge ese testigo con once trabajos originales que traen a la primera línea la historiografía de la Arqueología española. Estos trabajos, fruto de un congreso homónimo realizado en la Universidad Complutense de Madrid en 2016, abordan diferentes temas y perspectivas que abarcan importantes aspectos de la temática tratada con una variedad geográfica que atiende la diversidad y riqueza de la historiografía arqueológica española.

EDITORES
SERGIO ESPAÑA-CHAMORRO es doctor en Estudios del Mundo Antiguo por la Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Actualmente es investigador posdoctoral en la Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma (CSIC) y profesor adjunto en la Universidad Isabel I. Sus líneas de investigación versan sobre Arqueología del Paisaje centrándose en la Bética y en Italia, además de su participación en proyectos de investigación sobre el espacio doméstico en Pompeya y la escultura romana en Cartago. Ha realizado estancias de investigación en el Departamento de Arqueología de la University of Southampton, en el centro CIL de la Berlin-Brandenburgischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, en la Università degli Studi di Bari ‘Aldo Moro’ y en el Musei dei Fori Imperiali-Mercati di Traiano (Roma).

Rebeca Arranz Santos es graduada en Historia del Arte por la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, y posee un máster en Arqueología del Mediterráneo en la Antigüedad clásica por la misma universidad. Compagina su doctorando en Historia y Arqueología con su colaboración como profesora en el Centro de Estudios Artísticos Elba, donde imparte cursos de Arqueología de Grecia, Arqueología de Roma y Arte de Mesopotamia y del Mediterráneo Oriental. Es miembro del grupo de trabajo del Proyecto I+D+I de la Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando. Además, ha realizado una estancia de doctorado en Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma.

Alberto Romero Molero es doctor en Prehistoria, Arqueología y Patrimonio por la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Actualmente es director del Grado en Historia y Geografía de la Universidad Isabel I. Ha formado parte de numerosos proyectos de investigación, tanto nacionales como en el extranjero, lo que le ha permitido asistir y organizar numerosos seminarios, congresos, cursos y eventos de difusión científica. Sus líneas de investigación se centran en la arquitectura romana, el estudio de las técnicas constructivas, el análisis arqueológico de los espacios domésticos y la historia de las investigaciones arqueológicas. Ha desarrollado trabajos de campo, tanto de excavación como de documentación, en Carteia (San Roque, Cádiz), Baelo Claudia (Tarifa, Cádiz), Banasa (Marruecos), Veio y Pompeya (Italia).
NEW: SOMA 2015: Time, Space and People Proceedings of the 19th Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology edited by Murat Arslan. iv+190 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (69 colour plates). 49 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918514. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918521. Book contents pageDownload

The 19th annual meeting of the Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology (SOMA) was held in Kemer/Antalya (Turkey) from the 12th to the 14th of November, 2015. As has been the case in the past, this symposium continues to provide an important opportunity for scholars and researchers to come together and discuss their academic studies in a friendly and supportive atmosphere. The proceedings of SOMA 2015 contain eighteen interdisciplinary articles on themes from underwater archaeology to history, archaeometry and art history, and chronologically, the subjects of these articles range from the Bronze Age to the 20th century.

About the Editor
Murat Arslan is the editor of SOMA 2015. He is professor of Ancient History at Akdeniz University in Antalya (Turkey). He is interested in Ancient Greek and Ancient History, especially the Classical and Hellenistic periods, and historiography. In addition to his monographs (Galatians, Mithradates VI Eupator, Classical and Hellenistic History of Byzantion), his translations and commentaries on periplus (Arrianus, Ps. Scylax), and Memnon of Heracleia Pontica, he is the current editor in chief of several international journals (Cedrus, MJH, Phaselis, Libri).
NEW: Who Owns the Past? Archaeological Heritage between Idealism and Destruction edited by Maja Gori (editor-in-chief). 123 pages; full colour throughout. 2 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917630. £25.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 2531-8810-2-2017. Book contents pageDownload

The second issue of Ex Novo hosts papers exploring the various ways in which the past is remembered, recovered, created and used. In particular, contributions discuss the role of archaeology in present-day conflict areas and its function as peacekeeping tool or as trigger point for military action.

NEW: Yacimiento Pixel Los videojuegos como cultura material by Daniel García Raso. 23 2018. ISBN 9788416725120. £19.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Can you excavate a videogame? In its material sense we can. However, the concept of a videogame can also be studied from the archaeological thought. This book examines the videogame as material culture, and does it beyond its history to answer a series of questions of interest: Why are there videogames? How do we play? Why? What does their production imply? Where is the ideology behind? Questions that can be summed in one: Are videogames, as material culture, what we always thought they were?

SPANISH DESCRIPTION: ¿Se puede excavar un videojuego? En su aspecto más material ya podemos decir que sí. Sin embargo, el propio concepto de videojuego también es susceptible de ser analizado por el pensamiento arqueológico. Este libro examina y describe el videojuego como cultura material, esto es, la fuente principal de conocimiento con la que se construye la arqueología. Y lo hace más allá de su historia y su estrecha relación con la arqueología, con la intención de responder a una serie de preguntas de sumo interés: ¿A qué responde el juego? ¿Cómo jugamos? ¿Por qué? ¿Qué implica la producción de videojuegos? ¿Cómo se manifiesta la ideología a través de los videojuegos? En definitiva, cuestiones que podrían resumirse en una sola: ¿Son los videojuegos, como cultura material, lo que tradicionalmente se ha pensado de ellos? Pregunta a la que se da respuesta desde una perspectiva analítica desmitificadora que nos muestra la vertiente más arqueológica de un fenómeno social y cultural contemporánea que, en definitiva, es una alegoría material de la humanidad.
NEW: Cuando (no siempre) hablan las piedras Hacia una arqueología integral en España como recurso de futuro. EL caso de Andalucia. 594 pages; Spanish text.. 22 2018. ISBN 9788416725113. £19.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Desiderio Vaquerizo Gil, Catedra?tico de Arqueologi?a en la Universidad de Co?rdoba, docente vocacional hasta los huesos, con una excelente formacio?n acade?mica, y empen?ado al ma?ximo con el objetivo de que la arqueologi?a sea realmente una ciencia social, reflexiona en este libro, de forma apasionada, lu?cida, cri?tica, valiente y comprometida sobre la arqueologi?a de los u?ltimos treinta y cinco an?os en Espan?a, con una consideracio?n especial sobre Andaluci?a y especi?ficamente Co?rdoba, pero sin perder nunca el referente ma?s amplio de la disciplina y utilizando el a?rea de estudio como atalaya para mirar mucho ma?s alla?. El tema, extenso y complejo, abarca muchos a?mbitos y exige perspectivas muy diferentes, que van desde una o?ptica profesional e investigadora a otra divulgativa y de percepcio?n social, pasando por una legislativa y au?n poli?tica (con mayu?scula), otra patrimonial y econo?mica, la internacional del mundo globalizado en que vivimos y hasta una perspectiva autocri?tica, que preside todo el discurso. Desde ahi? pretende buscar salidas de futuro para la situacio?n delicada en que se encuentra la arqueologi?a en nuestro pai?s, despue?s de la crisis econo?mica iniciada en 2008 —que desarbolo? al sector de empresas de arqueologi?a, dejo? tocada a la Universidad y congelo? expectativas en los museos—, y que sigue abierta todavi?a, con muchas incertidumbres en el horizonte. En el panorama de la arqueologi?a espan?ola esta reflexio?n es singular; no contamos con demasiadas voces claras y cri?ticas que quieran comprometerse por escrito para dejar testimonio pu?blico de la historia reciente y la situacio?n actual; desborda sinceridad y buenas intenciones a partes iguales, y proporciona valiosos materiales con lo que seguir levantando una arqueologi?a del siglo XXI, que sera? inevitablemente una «arqueologi?a en construccio?n».
NEW Sentidos indisciplinados Arqueología, sensorialidad y narrativas alternativas edited by José Roberto Pellini, Andrés Zarankin and Melisa A. Salerno. 400 pages; Spanish text.. 21 2017. ISBN 9788416725106. £20.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

In recent years, archeology has been reflecting more and more on how we can use the senses to generate "non-Cartesian" models and, therefore, alternatives to those that dominated the discipline from its origins. The book starts from the premise that sensoriality can not be separated from affections, emotions or memories. Taking into account this idea, various South American archaeologists seek to "indiscipline the senses", exploring the potential that these new approaches offer to explore the material world.

En el mundo occidental y cientificista, los sentidos fueron reducidos a herramientas fisiológicas para capturar los estímulos a nuestro alrededor. Al mismo tiempo, fueron pensados jerárquicamente desde una postura centrada en la visión. Sin embargo, los sentidos son algo más que lo sugerido por esta visión reduccionista; son resultado de prácticas materiales-discursivas que nos permiten afectar y ser afectados por el mundo. En los últimos años, la arqueología viene reflexionando cada vez más sobre cómo podemos usar los sentidos para generar modelos «no cartesianos» y, por lo tanto, alternativos a los que dominaron la disciplina desde sus orígenes. El libro parte de la premisa que la sensorialidad no puede ser separada de los afectos, de las emociones o de las memorias. Teniendo en cuenta esta idea, diversos arqueólogos sudamericanos buscan «indisciplinar los sentidos», explorando el potencial que estos nuevos abordajes poseen para aproximarnos de otras formas al mundo material.
NEW: Archaeology and Neoliberalism by Pablo Aparicio Resco. 422 pages. 17 2017. ISBN 9788494436871. £18.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This book tries to question the influence of neoliberal politics in the practice of archaeology. Through a series of contributions from all over the world (although focusing in Spain) and covering a wide range of topics, authors will delve into the problems that arise, where do they come from and how to overcome them.

Click the blue 'Contents' button to download the table of contents and complete preface for free.
NEW: ARAMAZD Subscriptions and Back-Issues Armenian Journal of Near Eastern Studies (AJNES) edited by Aram Kosyan (Editor–in–Chief). One volume published annually in 1-2 issues. 11 2017. ISBN 1829-1376-HOME. Book contents pageBuy Now

Established in 2006 by the Association for Near Eastern and Caucasian Studies in corporation with Institute of Oriental Studies and Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography (National Academy of Sciences of Armenia) AJNES is the only periodical in the Republic of Armenia devoted exclusively to the investigation of ancient and medieval cultures of the Near East and the Caucasus. Articles appearing in its pages are contributions of scholars of international reputation in history, archaeology, philology, art, religion and science.

Archaeopress was pleased to take on publishing duties in 2017, handling subscriptions for future volumes and back-issue sales. Subscriptions are available in print and online with special rates for private individuals.

Click here to subscribe (2018: Volume XII, 2 issues):

SUBSCRIPTION RATES (all prices exclusive of VAT where applicable):

Private individuals:
Print: £45 including free shipping in UK & Europe (£10 ROW). Includes free PDF copy.
PDF: £25 (+VAT where applicable).

Institutions:
Print: £70 including free shipping in UK & Europe (£10 ROW).
Print & Online access: £75 (+ VAT where applicable) including free shipping in UK & Europe (£10 ROW).
Online access only: £65 (+ VAT where applicable).

NEW: Ash-Sharq Subscriptions and Back-Issues Bulletin of the Ancient Near East: Archaeological, Historical and Societal Studies edited by Laura Battini (editor-in-chief). One volume published annually in 2 issues.ISBN 2513-8529-HOME. Book contents pageBuy Now

Ash-sharq is a journal devoted to short articles on the archaeology, history and society of the Ancient Near East. It is published twice a year. The editorial board is headed by Laura Battini (Paris, UMR 7192-Collège de France, France).

SUBSCRIBE: click here to subscribe (2018: Volume 2, 2 issues).

SUBSCRIPTION RATES (all prices exclusive of VAT where applicable):

Private individuals:
Print: £30. Includes free digital copy.
Special price for digital only subscribers: £10 (+VAT where applicable).

Institutions:
Print: £50
Print & Online access: £55 (+ VAT where applicable)
Online access only: £30 (+ VAT where applicable)

Standard shipping rates apply to all orders

An up-to-date contents listing for the journal is available online here: Ash-sharq contents 2017

BACK-ISSUES

Ash-sharq Vol 1 No 1-2, 2017
NEW: EX NOVO: Journal of Archaeology: Subscriptions and Back-Issues One volume published annually edited by Maja Gori and Paolo Fallai (editors-in-chief). ISBN 2531-8810-HOME. Book contents pageBuy Now

Ex Novo is a fully peer reviewed open access international journal that promotes interdisciplinary research focusing on the multiple relations between archaeology and society. It engages with contemporary perspectives on antiquity linking past and present, and encourages archaeology’s engagement with theoretical developments from other related disciplines such as history, anthropology, political sciences, philosophy, social sciences and colonial studies. Ex Novo encompasses prehistory to modern period, and by exploring interconnections between archaeological practice and the importance of the past in current society it encourages an exploration of current theoretical, political and heritage issues connected to the discipline. Areas and topics of interest include: politics and archaeology, public archaeology, the legacies of colonialism and nationalism within the discipline, the articulation between local and global archaeological traditions, the discipline’s involvement in memory and identity, museum studies and restitution issues. Ex Novo encourages dialogue between disciplines concerned with the past and its relevance, uses and interpretations in the present. the Editors in Chief are Maja Gori (University of Heidelberg) and Paolo Fallai (Corriere della Sera). For further information including submission guideance please visit the Ex Novo homepage.

SUBSCRIBE: click here to subscribe (2018: Volume 3, 1 issue).

SUBSCRIPTION RATES (all prices exclusive of VAT where applicable):

Print Subscriptions:
Private individuals: £30
Institutions: £50

eJournal available as a free PDF download in Archaeopress Open Access upon publication of the printed edition. Standard shipping rates apply to all orders

An up-to-date contents listing for the journal is available online here: Ex Novo contents 2016-2017

BACK-ISSUES

Ex Novo Volume 1, 2016: The Impact of the Fall of Communism on European Heritage Proceedings of the 20th EAA Meeting held in Istanbul 10–14 September 2014
Ex Novo Volume 2, 2017: Who Owns the Past? Archaeological Heritage between Idealism and Destruction

NEW: Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture: Subscriptions and Back-Issues One volume published annually edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). ISBN 2399-1844-HOME. Book contents pageBuy Now

For the Hellenistic Period ceramics and other commodities of daily life represent probably the most neglected objects in archaeological research. Yet, the study of Hellenistic material culture has intensified during the last twenty years, with a focus clearly on what is by far the largest category of finds, pottery. Meanwhile research has gained momentum, but still there has unfortunately been no parallel development in the media landscape. Apart from monographs, the publication of conference proceedings, which usually follow several years after the event, have remained the principal method of disseminating research results. Still lacking is a publication appearing regularly and at short intervals, that focusses research on Hellenistic pottery and is easily accessible.

The Journal of Hellenistic Pottery – JHP – wants to close this gap.

JHP is scheduled to appear once a year, more often if necessary. It should provide a forum for all kinds of studies on Hellenistic pottery and everyday objects. Apart from professional articles, the journal will contain book reviews, short presentations of research projects (including dissertations) and general news. The Editorial Board is headed by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph.

SUBSCRIBE: click here to subscribe (2018: Volume 3, 1 issue).

SUBSCRIPTION RATES (all prices exclusive of VAT where applicable):

Print Subscriptions:
Private individuals: £30
Institutions: £50

eJournal available as a free PDF download in Archaeopress Open Access upon publication of the printed edition.

Standard shipping rates apply to all orders

An up-to-date contents listing for the journal is available online here: JHP contents 2016-2017


BACK-ISSUES (Available in print and as free-to-download PDF eJournals)

JHP Volume 1, 2016
JHP Volume 2, 2017

Archaeopress Digital Subscription Service: Institutional eBook Subscription Package 12 month subscription package for 2017/2018. Price listed without VAT. VAT may be applicable, please contact info@archaeopress.com to learn more. Only available as e-version. Institutional Price £1,250.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now


• 6-12 new eBooks each month
• 280+ backlist titles immediately available (plus over 200 open access eBooks and academic papers)
• No limits to concurrent users
• No limits to number of downloads
• IP Authentication, no username/password
• View online or download for offline access
• MARC / excel data for all titles


Our institutional digital subscription service is the most cost-effective way to access our complete range of eBook content saving over 50% on purchasing individual licences or the equivalent print editions each year.

A 12-month subscription to our complete list beginning in 2017/2018 costs £1,250 (+VAT, if applicable). Please note price below includes UK VAT but final VAT total may vary dependent on your location. If you are VAT exempt please contact our office and we can issue an invoice separately.

Click the Contents button above to download a short introduction and guide to the service.

Subscribe online using the institutional purchase option below. Please include all relevant contact details when making your purchase. A short user guide will be available to download immediately on completion of your order and we will contact you shortly thereafter to set-up online access for all eBook content.

For more information or to request a 30 day, no-cost and no-obligation trial, please contact Patrick Harris: patrick@archaeopress.com

FORTHCOMING: The Search for Winchester’s Anglo-Saxon Minsters by Martin Biddle with illustrations by Simon Hayfield. iv+76pp; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 420 2018 Winchester Excavations Committee Publication . ISBN 9781784918576. Book contents pageBuy Now

The ancient cathedral of Old Minster and the abbey church of New Minster once stood at the heart of Anglo-Saxon Winchester. Buildings of the first importance, honoured by Anglo-Saxon and Norman kings, these great churches were later demolished and their locations lost. Through an extensive programme of archaeological excavation begun in 1961, and as a result of years of research, the story of these lost minsters can now be revealed. Written by Martin Biddle, Director of the Winchester Excavations Committee and Research Unit, and marvellously illustrated by Simon Hayfield, The Search for Winchester’s Anglo-Saxon Minsters traces the history of these excavations from 1961 to 1970 and shows how they led to the discovery of the Old and New Minsters, bringing back to life the history, archaeology and architecture of Winchester’s greatest Anglo-Saxon buildings.

About the Author
PROFESSOR MARTIN BIDDLE is an Emeritus Fellow of Hertford College, Oxford, and Honorary Fellow of Pembroke College, Cambridge. He was the first Lecturer in Medieval Archaeology in England, at the University of Exeter (1963–67) and has held many other distinguished academic positions worldwide. He is the Founder and Director of the Winchester Excavations Committee (1962–present) and the Winchester Research Unit (1968–present). Professor Biddle is also Chairman of the Fabric Advisory Committee (FAC) for Winchester Cathedral, Archaeological Consultant for St Albans Cathedral, and former Archaeological Consultant for Canterbury Cathedral.

SIMON HAYFIELD is an experienced draughtsman who trained as a technical illustrator in the 1970s. He has spent most of his career working as a freelance artist, but has also worked at several top Midland advertising agencies, and lectured part time at the Birmingham College of Art. A love of history led him to archaeological illustration, in which he has worked with a number of senior scholars producing artist’s impressions, finds drawings, elevations and plans for publication. Simon Hayfield began his career in archaeological illustration working with the Winchester Research Unit in 1975 and continues to work with the Unit to this day preparing illustrations for volumes in the series of ‘Winchester Studies’.

Table of Contents
Preface; Introduction; Anglo-Saxon Winchester; Archaeological excavations and finds; Understanding the evidence; Evolution of Old Minster; Destruction of Old Minster; The Royal Quarter; Winchester Studies; Further Reading