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NEW: Performing the Sacra: Priestly roles and their organisation in Roman Britain by Alessandra Esposito. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+174 pages; 27 figures, 19 tables (21 plates in colour). 523 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 53. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690972. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690989. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Performing the Sacra: Priestly roles and their organisation in Roman Britain addresses the range of cultural responses to the Roman conquest of Britain with regards to priestly roles. The approach adopted is based on current theoretical trends focussing on dynamics of adaptation, multiculturalism, and appropriation characterising the continuity and emergence of these roles in the province. The book investigates three main themes: a model of priesthoods organisation in Britain, the embodiment of priestly authorities in a provincial environment, and how the different depositional contexts of priestly regalia contribute to our understanding of these roles. The methodical investigation of published and unpublished objects identifiable as priestly regalia is integrated into an assessment of historical, epigraphic, and iconographic sources mapped via the creation of a Geographic Information System. Highlighting the continuity of use of British priestly regalia between the Iron Age and the Roman period and contextualising this phenomenon in a wider provincial panorama from Spain to Syria, the regalia become crucial to mark the presence of priestly roles and their evolution. The biographical analysis of the regalia, especially when found in structured deposit, allows consideration on the organisation of cults, while their geographical distribution suggests different patterns of priestly organisation across different regions. After crossing this information with the epigraphic evidence for priestly titles, the result is a mosaic of engagements with priestly authority, particularly by elite or near-elite individuals, ultimately illustrating a fluid provincial culture behind the religious organisation of the ritual landscape of Britain.
NEW: Rethinking the Concept of ‘Healing Settlements’: Water, Cults, Constructions and Contexts in the Ancient World edited by Maddalena Bassani, Marion Bolder-Boos and Ugo Fusco. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+176 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 15 plates in colour. (Print RRP £35.00). 483 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 52. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690378. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690385. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Rethinking the Concept of ‘Healing Settlements’: Water, Cults, Constructions and Contexts in the Ancient World brings together papers dealing with therapeutic aspects connected to thermomineral sites both in Italy and in the Roman Provinces, as well as cultic issues surrounding health and healing. The first part of the book consists of contributions that are focused on the numerous problems concerning the exploitation of curative springs and the settlement patterns at spa sites in terms of topography, infrastructure, architecture, cult, society and economy, emphasizing the particularities accompanying the use of beneficial sources and comparing them to that of common freshwaters. The papers in the second part of the volume concentrate on religious aspects connected to health, fertility and healing, focussing especially on sites located at particular natural surroundings such as caves and water sources. Together, the contributions in this book give us an idea of the amount and quality of research currently being undertaken in different parts of the Roman world (and complemented by one paper on the Greek world) on the topic of health and healing associated with cults and salutiferous waters.

About the Author
MADDALENA BASSANI graduated with distinction in Classical Literature with archaeology specialization at Padua University. She is the author of approximately seventy publications and is a member of the editorial boards for Antenor Quaderni, Hesperìa. Studi sulla Grecità d'Occidente and Venetia/Venezia. Quaderni adriatici di storia e archeologia lagunare. In 2014 she obtained the National Scientific Qualification to function as Associate Professor.

MARION BOLDER-BOOS studied Classical Archaeology, Assyriology and Prehistory at the universities of Heidelberg and Cambridge, attaining her MA in 2005 and her PhD in 2010 from Heidelberg University. She has participated in various excavations (Phylakopi in Greece, Magdalensberg in Austria and Carthage in Tunisia) and has publishing on a wide range of subjects, such as Roman sanctuaries and deities, Roman urbanism, history of archaeology, ancient colonisation and Phoenician and Punic archaeology. Since 2006 she has been Assistant Professor in Classical Archaeology at Technical University Darmstadt.

UGO FUSCO has a BA in Classics and a MA in Classical Archaeology from Sapienza University of Rome, as well as a PhD in Classical Archaeology from the University of Pisa. He has excavated in Italy (Volterra, Rome, Veii and Grumento) and abroad (in London), investigating urban and rural sites. He has worked on various themes including: Roman architecture, prosopography, Latin epigraphy, topography of the suburbs of Rome, Roman archaic history and cults relating to water and mystery. He recently expanded his interests to include Greek architecture, considering the subject of double temples in Greece.
NEW: Thurrock’s Deeper Past: A Confluence of Time The archaeology of the borough of Thurrock, Essex, from the last Ice Age to the establishment of the English kingdoms by Christopher John Tripp. Paperback; 148x210mm; vi+200 pages; 65 figures, 6 maps (36 plates in colour). 504 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691115. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691122. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Thurrock’s Deeper Past: A Confluence of Time looks at the evidence for human activity in Thurrock and this part of the Thames estuary since the last Ice Age, and how the river crossing point here has been of great importance to the development of human settlement and trade in the British Isles. It is a book about the archaeology of Thurrock. It takes in all periods and most of the sites which have been excavated in the borough of Thurrock over the last sixty or more years.

The account opens at a time when Britain is still joined to the continent and the inhabitants are using flint tools and weapons. The author follows through the impact of the succeeding ages on the locality: the melting of the ice, the Neolithic period bringing the farming of crops and stockholding, the first appearance of worked metal in the Bronze Age, through the widespread use of iron in the Iron Age; and then the dramatic impact of Rome and its gradual dissolution to the English kingdoms whose traces are still recognisable today. All is set in the context of the author’s lasting interest in the subject, first nurtured at his Tilbury school.

About the Author
Thurrock was home to Chris Tripp for much of his early life. He attended St Chad’s Secondary Modern School in Tilbury and then Palmer’s Sixth Form College. After years spent in retail he became an archaeologist, graduating from the Institute of Archaeology (UCL) in 1986. He took up his first archaeological post in 1990 at the Passmore Edwards Museum, Plaistow, after which he worked for the Museum of London Archaeology Service and the Essex County Field Unit between 1995 and 2002. During this time he gained his masters degree in public archaeology at UCL.

For the next four years Chris worked on various excavations and community archaeology projects including ‘The Dig’ for the Museum of London, and ‘The Big Dig’ for Time Team/Channel 4 among many others. Moving to Dorset in 2006, he continued in archaeology and, inter alia established the ‘Dorset Diggers Community Archaeology Group’ to bring people closer to their local archaeological heritage.

It is in this spirit that he began research for this book in 1997, and his labours have been sustained by his passion for the past of his home borough of Thurrock and of the majestic Thames.
NEW: The Hypogeum of the Aurelii A new interpretation as the collegiate tomb of professional scribae by John Bradley. Paperback; 205x290mm; xiv+192 pages; 4 tables, 136 figures (81 plates in colour). (Print RRP £38.00). 486 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 50. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690477. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690484. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Hypogeum of the Aurelii: A new interpretation as the collegiate tomb of professional scribae examines the frescoes of one of the most enigmatic funerary monuments of ancient Rome. The three chambers of the Hypogeum of the Aurelii, so-named from an mosaic inscription in one of the surviving chambers, contain a varied series of images that have long been considered an example of early Christian or Gnostic iconography. One hundred years after the monument’s discovery Dr Bradley challenges earlier theories and concludes that far from having religious significance the pictures reveal a world of professional pride among a group of what we might today call ‘white collar workers’. Although not among the rich and famous of Imperial Rome, the deceased nevertheless rose from a state of slavery to positions within the bureaucracy at the centre of an empire at its height. Although part of a strictly hierarchical, and male-dominated, society the community to which the Aurelii belonged provided an environment of comparative equality: a community that acknowledged the contribution and expertise of both women and children in their profession. The pride in their achievement is reflected in the decoration of the tomb in which they expected to spend eternity. This study, the first in modern times to examine all the extant images in detail, will be of interest, not only to historians of ancient Roman art, but also to social historians who wish to more fully understand the lives of those who helped support the running of an empire.

About the Author
JOHN W. BRADLEY was born in Birmingham in 1956. He graduated with a degree in Construction and Economics before embarking on a thirty year career in the construction industry primarily in London and the Middle East. During the 1990s he was also involved in environmental politics using his background in industry to challenge the conventional rationale behind many of today’s political and economic decisions. Changing profession in 2005 Dr Bradley gained a first-class degree and Masters in Classics at Royal Holloway College, University of London with dissertations on early Christian art and republican Roman religion. In 2011 he commenced his PhD at the same college, initially under the supervision of Professor Amanda Claridge then Dr Zena Kamash. An initial project on the broader aspects of the evolution of art in the catacombs of Rome ultimately focused on the frescoes that make up the subject of this book when existing theories and explanations appeared unsatisfactory. In addition to his interest in the art of ancient Rome his interests include classical music, military history and environmentalism. He has lived in Brentford, west London for thirty years where he shares a home and allotment with his wife Susan.
NEW: Human Mobility in Archaeology: Practices, Representations and Meanings Ex Novo: Journal of Archaeology, Volume 3, 2018 edited by Maja Gori, Martina Revello Lami and Alessandro Pintucci. 3 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691214. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload

It has been abundantly demonstrated that theories and paradigms in the humanities are influenced by historical, economic and socio-cultural conditions, which have profoundly influenced archaeology’s representation of migration. This was mostly conceived as the study of the movement of large and homogenous population groups, whose identity was often represented as ethnically characterized. The present-day shift of attention from collective to individual agency and the countless facets of migration goes hand in hand with new socio-political and cultural scenarios such as the extraordinary migratory flows into Europe, shifting boundaries, alternative forms of citizenship and identity, and the emergence of emotive reactionism.

The third issue of Ex Novo gathers multidisciplinary contributions addressing mobility to understand patterns of change and continuity in past worlds; reconsider the movement of people, objects, and ideas alongside mobile epistemologies, such as intellectual, scholarly or educative traditions, rituals, practices, religions and theologies; and provide insights into the multifaceted relationship between mobile practices and their shared meanings and how they are represented socially and politically.

Table of Contents
Maja GORI, Martina REVELLO LAMI & Alessandro PINTUCCI
Editorial: Practices, Representations and Meanings of Human Mobility in Archaeology

Paraskevi ELEFANTI & Gilbert MARSHALL
Mobility during the Upper Palaeolithic Greece: Some Suggestions for the Argolid Peninsula

Maurizio CRUDO
Greek Migrations along the Ionian Coast (Southern Italy)

Anna RAUDINO
Variation in Material Culture: Adoption of Greek Ceramics in an Indigenous Sicilian Site (8th century BC)

Maria ÁLVAREZ-FOLGADO
The Jewish Diaspora in the Roman Empire. Diaspora, Social Agents and Social Networks: Towards the Creation of a New Analytical Toolkit

Domiziana ROSSI
A Road to Fīrūzābād

Marijn STOLK
Exploring Immigrant Identities: The Link between Portuguese Ceramics and Sephardic Immigrants in 17th Century Amsterdam

Jesùs GARCÍA SANCHEZ
From War Material Culture to Popular Heritage, and Beyond. The PSP “Cancelli di Venosa” as paradigms of Object Biography Theory.

Reviews
A. Falcone & A. D’Eredità (eds.) ARCHEOSOCIAL L’Archeologia Riscrive il Web: Esperienze, Strategie e Buone Pratiche, Rende (CS): Dielle Editore, 2018, 195 pp. Reviewed by Paola DI GIUSEPPANTONIO DI FRANCO
FORTHCOMING: Greco-Roman Cities at the Crossroads of Cultures: The 20th Anniversary of Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission Marina el-Alamein edited by Grażyna Bąkowska-Czerner and Rafał Czerner. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+312 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (128 colour plates). (Print RRP £60.00). 513 2019. ISBN 9781789691481. Book contents pageBuy Now

The ancient town, discovered at the site of today’s Marina el-Alamein, located on the northern coast of Egypt, developed from the 2nd century BC to the 6th century AD, finding itself at the crossroads of several civilisations: Hellenic, later replaced by Roman, and eventually Christian – and always strongly influenced by Egyptian tradition. A variety of cultures have met and appeared, their prominence flourishing and faltering at different times, but they have always co-existed and influenced one another. The syncretism prevailing here is notable in art, architecture, religion and worship.

In 2015, it had been thirty years since the discovery of the remains of the ancient city, which, for many centuries, had been unknown to the world. They were found unexpectedly during the preparatory work for the construction of a modern tourist settlement on the Mediterranean coast, and the significance and extraordinary value of the find was immediately recognised. Now the ancient city, and the historic remains of its buildings, are gradually coming to light.

The Jubilee was twofold, since 2015 marked also the 20th anniversary of the setting up of the Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission, Marina el-Alamein. During this time, architectural and archaeological research has been carried out at the site, many discoveries have been made, numerous relics of historic building structures have been preserved, and conservation methods have been improved. In the jubilee year, we invited researchers who work on archaeological sites and towns with a similar history and position in the ancient world, art and culture, to take part in a scientific discussion and exchange of experience. The authors of the presented papers are representatives of different disciplines and research methodologies: archaeologists, architects, Egyptologists, specialists in religious studies, historians and conservators. The present volume contains an interdisciplinary review of both the newest and long-term studies and achievements made in various regions of the ancient world.

Greco-Roman Cities at the Crossroads of Cultures: The 20th Anniversary of Polish- Egyptian Conservation Mission Marina el-Alamein presents papers ranging from ancient Mauritania, through Africa, Egypt, Cyprus, Palestine, Syria, as well as sites in Crimea and Georgia. The topography of cities, architecture of public buildings, as well as houses and their décor – architectural, sculptured and painted – are presented. Religious syncretism and the importance of ancient texts are discussed. Studies on pottery are also presented. The volume includes studies on the conservation of architecture, sculpture and painting. Several articles are devoted to the study of Marina el-Alamein; others talk about ancient Alexandria, Deir el- Bahari, Hermopolis Magna, Bakchias, Pelusium, Kom Wasit, Berenike, Ptolemais, Apollonia, Palmyra, Nea Paphos, as well as Chersonesus Taurica and Apsarus.

About the Editors
GRAŻYNA BĄKOWSKA-CZERNER (PhD) is Assistant Professor at the Centre of Comparative Studies of Civilisations of the Jagiellonian University. She specialises in archaeology of the Greco-Roman period in Egypt. Since 2001 she has been working as a permanent member of the Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission at the archaeological site Marina el-Alamein (Egypt), and since 2004 she has been a member of the Italian Archaeological Mission at Jebel Barkal (Sudan). Greco- Roman art, in particular iconography, are her main areas of interest. She is also involved in the study of ancient gems, as well as the iconography of decorated meroitic pottery.

RAFAŁ CZERNER (Professor) is the head of the Department of History of Architecture, Arts and Technology at the Faculty of Architecture, Wrocław University of Science and Technology (Poland) and the director of the Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission at the archaeological site Marina el-Alamein (Eg
FORTHCOMING: La raccolta e la distribuzione dell’acqua a Ventotene in età romana Ricerche archeologiche nell’isola di Ventotene 2 by Giovanni Maria De Rossi. Paperback; 205x290mm; 380pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Italian text. (Print RRP £65.00). 527 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . ISBN 9781789691467. Buy Now

La raccolta e la distribuzione dell’acqua a Ventotene in età romana is presented in two parts. The first examines the topographical and technical problem of the water supply on the island of Ventotene, where there is an absence of natural springs. The second, consisting of separate entries, analyses the individual components of the water supply system built by the Romans on the island. The Roman installation developed in two phases alongside changes in life at the villa located at Ventotene: the first connected to a residence used for otium, the second to an official site of relegatio ad insulam.

The Roman architect exploited the island’s natural slope to collect rainwater in a large initial reservoir, later known as the ‘Cistern of the Prisoners’, surmounted by a vast catchment basin: from here a conduit departed which, through various branches, reached the ‘heart’ of the villa extending over the promontory of Punta Eolo and the port facilities. The water was channelled from the cistern by an extensive network of tunnels, dug, depending on the height, either wholly or partially into the tufa or built on the surface.

Even during the second phase, when the villa was turned into a large and elaborate residential complex used throughout the year, it could rely only on rainwater as a resource. The Roman architect was thus forced to increase the collection areas, attempting to capture as much water as possible. This was achieved by increasing the number of large initial collection tanks, dislocating them strategically around the island to ensure that each of the sectors with the highest residential density and main infrastructure installations had its own independent resource alongside the standard existing resources. The number of catchment basins also multiplied considerably along the route of the main conduit and its branches.

About the Author
GIOVANNI MARIA DE ROSSI (Rome 1942), Full Professor of Topography of Ancient Italy at the University of Salerno, has published many articles and books on ancient and medieval topography. He has directed archaeological excavations in Italy, and he conceived and designed the Archaeological park and Historical-Archaeological museum at Ventotene island, where he has been director for over twenty years.

Italian Description
Il volume si compone di due parti. Nella prima viene esaminato il problema topografico e tecnico relativo all’approvvigionamento idrico dell’isola di Ventotene, in rapporto alla sostanziale assenza di sorgenti d’acqua. Nella seconda, composta di schede, si analizzano le singole componenti del sistema idrico costruito dai Romani nell’isola. L’impianto romano va inserito nelle due fasi di vita della villa realizzata a Ventotene: la prima legata a una residenza per l’otium, la seconda a una sede ufficiale per la relegatio ad insulam.

L’architetto romano sfruttò il naturale pendio dell’isola per raccogliere acqua piovana in un grande serbatoio iniziale, poi detto “Cisterna dei Carcerati”, sormontato da un vastissimo compluvio di raccolta: da qui partiva un condotto che raggiungeva, con varie diramazioni, il “cuore” della villa distesa sul promontorio di Punta Eolo e gli impianti portuali. Lo smistamento dell’acqua dal serbatoio venne affidato a una capillare rete di cunicoli, scavati, a seconda delle quote, interamente o parzialmente nel tufo oppure costruiti in superficie. Per aumentare notevolmente la quantità d’acqua messa a disposizione dell’impianto, si realizzarono lungo i condotti abbinamenti formati da compluvi di superficie e cisterne di raccolta.

Potendo contare, anche per la seconda fase, in cui però la villa erta stata trasformata in un grande e articolato complesso residenziale da utilizzarsi per tutto l’anno, sulla sola risorsa delle piogge, all’architetto romano di turno non rimase che l’espediente di aumentare i punti di raccolta, cercando così di captar
FORTHCOMING: Excavation of Later Prehistoric and Roman Sites along the Route of the Newquay Strategic Road Corridor, Cornwall by Andy M. Jones. Paperback; 205x290mm; 144pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 526 2019. ISBN 9781789691528. Buy Now

With contributions by Ryan S Smith, Dana Challinor, Julie Jones, Graeme Kirkham, Anna Lawson-Jones, Henrietta Quinnell and Roger Taylor.

During November and December 2014, the Cornwall Archaeological Unit undertook a programme of archaeological excavation in advance of construction of a road corridor to the south of Newquay. Evidence for Middle Bronze Age occupation took the form of a hollow-set roundhouse; however, the majority of the excavated features have been dated to the Iron Age and Roman periods. The area was enclosed as fields associated with extensive settlement activity throughout the last centuries cal BC into the third century AD.

The excavations revealed the character of settlement-related activity during the later prehistoric and Roman periods. The evidence strongly suggests growing intensification of agriculture, with ditched fields and enclosures appearing in the landscape from the later Iron Age and into the Roman period.

The results shed light on later prehistoric and Roman practices involving the division of the landscape with ditched fields and enclosed buildings. Many of the structures and pits were found to be set within their own ring-ditched enclosures or hollows, and the field system ditches were in some instances marked by ‘special’ deposits. As has previously been demonstrated for Middle Bronze Age roundhouses, structures could be subject to formal abandonment processes. Gullies and hollows were deliberately infilled, so that they were no longer visible at surface. However, unlike the abandoned Bronze Age roundhouses, the later structures appear to have been flattened and not monumentalized. In other words, buildings could be both etched into and subsequently erased from the landscape and thereby forgotten.

This volume takes the opportunity presented by investigations on the Newquay Strategic Road to discuss the complexity of the archaeology, review the evidence for ‘special’ deposits and explore evidence for the deliberate closure of buildings especially in later prehistoric and Roman period Cornwall. Finally, the possible motives which underlie these practices are considered.

About the Author
ANDY M. JONES is Principal Archaeologist with the Cornwall Archaeological Unit. His research interests include the Neolithic, Bronze Age periods, as well as the archaeology of the uplands and coastal areas of western Britain. His recent research includes the log coffin dating project and the publication of the Whitehorse Hill cist, Preserved in the Peat: An Extraordinary Bronze Age Burial on Whitehorse Hill (2016). In 2017 he co-edited An Intellectual Adventurer in Archaeology: Reflections on the work of Charles Thomas. Other recent publications include Settlement and Metalworking in the Middle Bronze Age and Beyond: New evidence from Tremough, Cornwall (2015) and Archaeology and Landscape at the Land’s End, Cornwall (2016).
FORTHCOMING: NVMINA MAGNA: Roma e il culto dei Grandi Dei di Samotracia by Emiliano Cruccas. Paperback; 175x245mm; 170pp; 1 table, 73 figures (21 plates in colour). Italian text throughout. 507 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . ISBN 9781789690910. Buy Now

The cult of the Great Gods of Samothrace, which became popular starting as early as the 7th century BC in the eastern Mediterranean, is characterised by regional differences concerning cultural manifestations and relationships with local deities. Confused and identified with the so-called Cabiri, these deities had their main sanctuaries on the islands of Samothrace and Lemnos and in Thebes, in Boeotia. The connection between these deities and others like Dioscuri, Penates and Lares and their protective function seem to be a key to understanding the complex syncretism that characterises the cult of the Great Gods from the period of Roman conquests in the Eastern world. The literary sources seem to highlight, in fact, in the period in which the interests in the Eastern world are crucial to the foreign policy of Rome, an evident attempt to identify the Kabiroi of Samothrace with typically Roman gods like Lares and Penates. The aim of this book is to underline the main aspects of the cult in light of the influences of Roman cultural and mythological substratum.

Il culto dei Grandi Dei di Samotracia, diffuso nel Mediterraneo orientale a partire almeno dal VII secolo a.C., è caratterizzato da differenze nei diversi bacini geografici, sia per ciò che concerne le manifestazioni culturali, sia per quanto riguarda i rapporti con le divinità locali. Confusi ed identificati con i cosiddetti Cabiri, queste divinità avevano i loro principali santuari sulle isole di Samotracia e Lemno e a Tebe di Beozia. La loro connessione con i Dioscuri, i Penati e i Lari e la loro funzione protettiva sembrano essere la chiave di lettura per comprendere il complesso sincretismo che caratterizza il culto dei Grandi Dei a partire dalla conquista romana del Mediterraneo occidentale. Le fonti letterarie sembrano evidenziare, infatti, nel periodo nel quale le azioni di politica estera di Roma si concentrano in Oriente, una forte volontà di identificare gli dei di Samotracia con divinità tipicamente romane come Lari e Penati. Lo scopo di questo libro è quello di mettere in evidenza i principali aspetti del culto attraverso l’analisi delle influenze del sostrato culturale e mitologico di Roma.

About the Author
EMILIANO CRUCCAS completed his degree (2002) and his specialisation in Classical Archaeology (2006) at the University of Cagliari and received his PhD (2011) from the University of Tübingen (with a thesis on the cult of the Kabiroi and Great Gods). He worked on a two-year contract at the Young Researchers project at the University of Cagliari and holds a three-year postdoctoral grant. He is now (2013-present day) field director for the ISTHMOS excavation project in the Punic-roman city of Nora (south Sardinia).

EMILIANO CRUCCAS ha conseguito presso l’Università di Cagliari la laurea (2002) e la specializzazione in Archeologia Classica (2006). È Dottore di ricerca con una tesi sul culto dei Cabiri e dei Grandi Dei discussa all’Università di Tübingen (2011). Ha svolto ricerca presso l’Università di Cagliari con un contratto di due anni per Giovani Ricercatori e con un assegno di ricerca di tre anni. Attualmente dirige sul campo il progetto di scavo ISTHMOS nella città punico-romana di Nora (sud Sardegna).
FORTHCOMING: Urbanisation in the Time of Claudius in the Western Provinces of the Empire by Erika Cappelletto. Paperback; 205x290mm; 314pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £50.00). 487 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . ISBN 9781789690507. Buy Now

This volume analyses Claudius’ activities in the provinces of the western Empire in order to get an idea of his political attitude in a broader context and see how his interests in the provinces influenced the urban works.

The first aim of the project was to find structures, urban development and changes in the cities which were directly connected to Claudius; the second was to reflect on planning issues and strategies adopted by the emperor. A comprehensive examination of new buildings, or additions to prior ones (with statues, for example), was conducted in order to understand the underlying intentions, as well as how, and in which way, the prototypes in Italy influenced construction in the provinces. The final aim was connected to Venturi’s work, who deals with Claudius’ activities in Italy and in particular at Rome and Ravenna. The question was whether the trends found by Venturi can also be applied to the provinces. As a result of these investigations, the author has been able to propose new trends which might explain the emperor’s political actions.

About the Author
ERIKA CAPPELLETTO received a degree from the University of Venice with a thesis about the representation of spinning implements on gravestones. She gained her Masters from the same university with a study of the black glazed pottery from Pompeii. During this period, she participated in different projects in Italy and studied for six months at Ankara with the Erasmus project. Later, she moved to Heidelberg where she completed her PhD. She has participated in international projects and conferences, frequented workshops and undertaken an internship in digital archaeology (3d reconstruction and modelling). She currently works in cultural heritage in Germany.
FORTHCOMING: Funerary Archaeology and Changing Identities: Community Practices in Roman-Period Sardinia by Mauro Puddu. Paperback; 205x290mm; 210pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £40.00). 472 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . ISBN 9781789690002. Buy Now

Three main research-questions intertwine in this volume. These are, first, the theoretical issue of how we can infer identities from archaeology; second, what is the material relationship between Sardinia's communities and the Roman world's power and culture when looking at the burial evidence on the ground; third, how our interpretive frameworks of today's world and symbolic structure can affect our understanding of the past. This book attempts to answer these three questions by analysing in detail the funerary evidence from mostly-unpublished burial sites from southern and central Sardinia that can become key to an alternative interpretation of the island and of other Roman Provinces. The questions are answered throughout the book by drawing on social studies, particularly post-colonial approaches to the history of the past, interpretive frameworks on the Roman world, and semiotic theories. By looking in-depth at the archaeological evidence from Sardinia's burials, this book retrieves the active and creative role played by the local communities in shaping back the Roman-world within the specific material and historical conditions they lived in.

About the Author
MAURO PUDDU has spent most of his years as an archaeologist researching Sardinia. After studying at the Universita degli Studi di Cagliari for his BA in Cultural Heritage and his first Masters in Classical Archaeology, he decided to broaden up his research horizons by taking a second Masters at University College London in Theoretical Archaeology. He applied the knowledge acquired in Italy and the United Kingdom to research the funerary practices of Roman-period Sardinia during his PhD at the University of Cambridge, which he has recently completed. During a decade of research, the author has taken part in numerous successful archaeological projects, including the excavation of “La Sella del Diavolo”, Cagliari, run by the Soprintendenza archeologica di Cagliari; the Al-Mafjar Project in Jericho, Palestine, run by Birzeit University and the Khalili Research Centre, University of Oxford; and the Interamna Lirenas Project, run by the University of Cambridge. While working on his future research projects and publications, the author has been working as an archaeologist around London and Cambridge for the last three years, taking part in a vast number of projects, including the excavation of the Westminster School next to Westminster Abbey.

Table of Contents (Provisional)
PREFACE
1. ROMAN-PERIOD SARDINIA: A SEMIOTIC THEORY OF IDENTITY
2. BURIALS OF SARDINIA: METHODOLOGY OF DATA COLLECTION
3.FUNERARY PRACTICE AND THE URBAN COMMUNITIES OF SULCI
4.FUNERARY PRACTICE AND RURAL COMMUNITIES OF MASULLAS
5. FUNERARY PRACTICES AND URBAN COMMUNITIES IN KARALES
6. CONNECTING THE DOTS: SULCI, MASULLAS, KARALES AND THE MEDITTERRANEAN
7. SARDINIA’S COMMUNITIES AND THE MEDITERRANEAN AT LARGE
APPENDIX 1
APPENDIX 2: COARSE WARE TYPOLOGY OF CERAMICS FROM MASULLAS
NEW: Sanctuaries in Roman Dacia Materiality and Religious Experience by Csaba Szabó. Paperback; viii+242 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (54 plates in colour). 502 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 49. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690811. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690828. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is the first comprehensive work focusing on lived ancient religious communication in Roman Dacia. Testing for the first time the ‘Lived Ancient Religion’ approach in terms of a peripheral province from the Danubian area, this work looks at the role of ‘sacralised’ spaces, known commonly as sanctuaries in the religious communication of the province.

The author analyses the role of space sacralisation, religious appropriation, embodiment and the social impact of religious communication in urban contexts (Apulum), military contexts (Porolissum and Mehadia), and numerous examples from rural (non-urban) environments (Ampelum, Germisara, Ad Mediam, and many others). The book concentrates not only on the creation and maintenance of sacralised spaces in public and secondary locations, but also on their role at the micro-level of objects, semi-micro level of spaces (settlements), and the macro-level of the province and the Danubian region as a whole. Innovatively as regards provincial archaeological research, this book emphasises the spatial aspects of lived ancient religion by analysing for the first time the sanctuaries as spaces of religious communication in Dacia. The work also contains a significant chapter on the so-called ‘small-group’ religions (the Bacchic, Mithraic and Dolichenian groups of the province), which are approached for the first time in detail. The study also gives the first comprehensive list of archaeologically-epigraphically- attested, and presumed sacralised spaces within Dacia.

About the Author
CSABA SZABO (1987) is an assistant lecturer at the University of Lucian Blaga, Sibiu (Romania). After finishing his undergraduate studies in Cluj-Napoca in 2012, he studied at the University of Pécs and the Max Weber Kolleg, Erfurt as member of the Sanctuary Project. His current research is focusing on Roman religious communication and space sacralisation in the Danubian provinces, history of archaeology in Transyslvania, and public archaeology in Romania.
NEW: Pottery Production, Landscape and Economy of Roman Dalmatia Interdisciplinary approaches edited by Goranka Lipovac Vrkljan and Ana Konestra. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+128 pages; 82 figures, 10 tables (56 colour plates). (Print RRP £30.00). 491 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 47. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690729. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690736. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Pottery Production, Landscape and Economy of Roman Dalmatia: Interdisciplinary approaches offers results of work undertaken as part of the RED project - Roman Economy in Dalmatia: production, distribution and demand in the light of pottery workshops (IP-11-2013-3973). It presents interdisciplinary research carried out on the Roman sites of pottery workshops active within the coastal area of the province of Dalmatia as well as on material recovered during the excavations. The presentation revolves around three thematic units: workshops and their products together with their role in the local provincial economy, location of workshops within the landscape, and archaeometric research which connects the two. These combined approaches contribute to the study of ceramic production in the area whereas new methodological approaches to the subject allow for the placement of pottery workshops in the broader context of Roman economy and landscape and natural resources of the eastern Adriatic.

About the Editors Goranka Lipovac Vrkljan was born in Zagreb, where she graduated history and archaeology at the Faculty of Philosophy of the University of Zagreb where she also obtained her doctorate in 2001. She is employed at the Institute of Archaeology in Zagreb as a scientific collaborator, where she has also been leading the Croatian Science Foundation project Roman Economy in Dalmatia: Production, distribution and demand in the light of pottery workshops – RED (IP-11-2013-3973). Her scholarly interests include Roman economy with particular regard to pottery workshops and their products.

Ana Konestra, born in Rijeka, graduated archaeology at the Faculty of Philosophy of the University of Udine. She gained her doctorate at the University of Zadar in 2016, with a dissertation on imported Roman finewares to Liburnia. She is a post-doctoral fellow at the Institute of Archaeology, Zagreb, conducting research on Roman rural landscapes and material culture, in particular pottery, and is a member of the Roman Economy in Dalmatia: Production, distribution and demand in the light of pottery workshops – RED (IP-11-2013-3973) project research group.
NEW: Roman Amphorae in Neuss: Augustan to Julio-Claudian Contexts by Horacio González Cesteros and Piero Berni Millet. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+136 pages; 7 tables, 49 figures (5 plates in colour). 482 2018 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 12. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690521. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690538. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The occupation of the territories on both sides of the Rhine was an enormous logistical challenge for the Roman military administration. In the last two decades of the first century BC, several territories were conquered or partially occupied by the Roman legions, establishing a large number of military camps around the Rhine and its important eastern tributaries. Most of these camps were occupied for short periods, depending on the march of the legions and the course of military events. In a location with good natural defences and communications with the Belgian hinterland, Neuss was one of the earliest points on the Rhine where the Roman military was positioned. The area was occupied—with some intervals—from 16 BC onwards by different legions as well as smaller units.

This book provides an in-depth study of one of the most important archaeological artefacts for understanding the military supply along the German frontier: the amphorae. Deliveries arrived at the different military camps established in the intersection between Erf and Rhine from 16 BC until the Claudian principate. The study of this material is essential not only for understanding Neuss, but for further understanding of the whole Rhine and the logistics of the Roman army and its supply from very distant areas.

About the Authors
Horacio González Cesteros has a doctorate from the University of Tarragona and the Catalan Archaeological Institute. He is part of the research staff of the Austrian Archaeological Institute. His research areas are commercial and agrarian economy and social studies of the late Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods. He has published several articles and edited books mainly focussing on amphora studies. He has been part of and has directed several projects in Spain, Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, Croatia, Greece and Turkey, collaborating with many different research institutions.

Piero Berni Milet has a doctorate from the University of Barcelona. He is linked to the research unit of the LabEx Archimède of the University of Montpellier. His research areas are social and economic studies in classical antiquity using the so-called Instrumentum Domesticum Inscriptum as the preferred tool. He has published many articles and books mainly focussing on aspects of the ownership systems and land exploitation patterns; production and consumption of food; economic interdependence between producer territories and consumer markets; and social promotion of individuals and families by trading within the Roman social structure. He has worked in many different projects in Spain, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Croatia, as part of different teams and collaborating with different research institutions.
NEW: The Function of the Roman Army in Southern Arabia Petraea by Mariana Castro. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+216 pages; 34 figures + illustrated site catalogue (48 plates in colour). 477 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 48. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919528. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919535. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Over the last decades, discussions about the functions of the Roman army in frontier areas have contributed to a complex understanding of the military and its interactions with local geographies and peoples throughout the Empire. Nevertheless, in the region of Arabia, there is still little consensus about the purpose of the Roman military presence, its fluctuating functions, or the role of hundreds of fortified buildings scattered across the landscape. So far, these questions have remained unanswered due to a lack of excavation data and the scarcity of ancient accounts directly involving the military in Arabia Petraea. This study aims to provide a fresh perspective on these issues by employing a landscape approach, paralleling it with the ancient sources which describe the roles of the Roman military in the East. Using a variety of digital resources to contextually map and model the ancient system of fortifications, settlements, and trade routes, we can now better understand the evolving and diverse functions of the Roman army in Arabia from the creation of the province to the end of the Byzantine period.

About the Author
Mariana Castro received a BA in Archaeology and Asian Studies (Honors) from Brigham Young University, where she focused on Classical and Chinese history, languages, and archaeology. During her master’s degree at the University of Oxford—which she attended as an Ertegun Scholar—Mariana enriched her knowledge of the Hellenistic and Roman periods and engaged more directly with the fields of landscape and frontier archaeology, geographical information systems, and site management and protection. Currently she is a PhD candidate at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University. Mariana has participated in numerous archaeological field projects in Europe, the Middle East, and Central Asia, most directly concerning long-distance trade and exchange.
NEW: Rural Cult Centres in the Hauran: Part of the broader network of the Near East (100 BC – AD 300) by Francesca Mazzilli. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+208 pages; 43 figures, 3 maps, 5 tables (3 plates in colour). (Print RRP £32.00). 464 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 51. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919542. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919559. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Rural Cult Centres in the Hauran: Part of the broader network of the Near East (100 BC–AD 300) challenges earlier scholars’ emphasis on the role played by local identities and Romanisation in religion and religious architecture in the Roman Empire through the first comprehensive multidisciplinary analysis of rural cult centres in the Hauran (southern Syria) from the pre-Roman to the Roman period. The Hauran is an interesting and revealing area of study because it has been a geographical cross-point between different cultures over time. Inspired by recent theories on interconnectivity and globalisation, the monograph argues that cult centres, and the Hauran itself, are part of a human network at a macro level on the basis of analysis of archaeological, architectural, sculptural and epigraphic evidence and landscape. As a result of this multi-disciplinary approach, the text also re-assesses the social meaning of these sanctuaries, discusses the identity of the elite group that contributed financially to the building of sanctuaries, and attempts to reconstruct ritual and economic activities in cult centres. This book re-evaluates the significance of contacts between the elite of the Hauran and other cultures of the Near East in shaping cult sites; it includes a first catalogue of rural cult centres of the Hauran in the appendix.

About the Author
FRANCESCA MAZZILLI is a Roman pottery specialist at the Cambridge Archaeological Unit, University of Cambridge (since March 2015). She holds a PhD in Archaeology at the University of Durham for her thesis Beyond Religion: Cultural Exchange and Economy in Syria. Over the last ten years she has worked as an archaeologist in England, Italy and Jordan. Her main research interests are Roman religion, architecture, landscape, theory and pottery. She has presented papers covering these topics in various international conferences in Europe. Together with Dies Van Der Linde she is currently co-editing a book entitled Dialectics of Religion in the Roman World. She has been a member of the Theoretical Roman Archaeological Conference (TRAC) standing committee and of the Theoretical Roman Archaeological Journal (TRAJ) editorial team since March 2017.
NEW: Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 3 2018 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). Paperback; vi+526 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (107 colour plates). 3 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690316. £60.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690323. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now


NEW: KOINON: The International Journal of Classical Numismatic Studies Volume 1, 2018 Inaugural Issue edited by Nicholas J. Molinari (General Editor); Shawn Caza, Lloyd W.H. Taylor (Associate Editors). Paperback; 220x280mm; vi+152 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (45 plates in colour). 1 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690293. £35.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690309. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

As the name indicates, KOINON is a journal that encourages contributions to the study of classical numismatics from a wide variety of perspectives. The journal will include papers concerning iconography, die studies, provenance research, forgery analysis, translations of excerpts from antiquarian works, specialized bibliographies, corpora of rare varieties and types, ethical questions on laws and collecting, book reviews, and more. The editorial advisory board is made up of members from all over the world, with a broad range of expertise covering virtually all the major categories of classical numismatics from archaic Greek coinage to late Medieval coinage.

Table of contents for the inaugural issue:
Why a New Journal in Classical Numismatics? An Editorial by Nicholas J. Molinari

GREEK NUMISMATICS
Sophocles’ Trachiniae and the Apotheosis of Herakles: The Importance of Acheloios and Some Numismatic Confirmations – by Nicholas J. Molinari
Provenance Lost and Found: Alfred Bourguignon – by John Voukelatos
A Philip III Tetradrachm Die Pair Recycled by Seleukos I – by Lloyd W.H. Taylor
Blundered Era Date on Coin of Arados, Civic Year 119 – by Martin Rowe

ROMAN NUMISMATICS
Sotto l’egida di Minerva: Echi monetali delle imprese britanniche da Cesare ai Severi – by Luigi Pedroni
A Doubted Variety of M. Aemilius Scaurus and P. Plautius Hypsaeus Vindicated – by Jordan Montgomery and Richard Schaefer
Redating Nepotian’s Usurpation and the Coinage of Magnentius – by Shawn Caza
A previously unrecorded reverse for Constantine I – by Victor Clark

ORIENTAL NUMISMATICS
The Dating and the Sequence of the Persid Frataraka Revisited – by Wilhelm Müseler
The Kilwa Coins of Sultan al-Ḥasan ibn Sulaymān in their Historical Context – by N.J.C. Smith
An Introduction to Parthian Silver Fractions, The Little Anomalies of Arsacid Coinage – by Bob Langnas
An interesting denaro tornese of the Barons Revolt of 1459-1464 and some considerations regarding Nicola II di Monforte – by Andrei Bontas

A CATALOG OF NEW VARIETIES
Die Bleifunde der römisch-republikanischen Anlage von Sanisera, Menorca Archäologische und archäometrische Analyse by Regine Müller. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+248 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (54 plates in colour). 462 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 46. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919887. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919894. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume includes the archaeological and archaeometrical analysis of the lead finds from the Roman Republican military fort of Sanisera in northern Minorca. The fort was built after the Roman conquest of the island in 123 BC and abandoned during the last third of the 1st century BC. By correlating typological-archaeological and scientific methods, the site’s unusual large number of lead objects/artefacts are examined within their find context and reviewed for superregional connections to contemporary sites within the Mediterranean. Furthermore, based upon the results of the find analyses as well as the examination of written sources, the site’s embedding within the historical context of the development of the late Roman Republic and early Imperial times is presented, especially in respect to the conquest of the Mediterranean and the consolidation of the Roman authority there.

Die vorliegende Arbeit umfasst die archäologische und archäometrische Analyse der Bleifunde der römisch-republikanischen Militäranlage von Sanisera im Norden Menorcas. Die Anlage entstand nach 123 v. Chr. in Folge der Eroberungen der Baleareninseln und wurde spätestens im letzten Drittel des 1. Jh. v. Chr. aufgegeben. Anhand der Korrelation typologisch-archäologischer und naturwissenschaftlicher Methoden wird hier die ungewöhnlich hohe Anzahl von Bleifunden aus der Anlage innerhalb ihres Fundkontextes analysiert und auf überregionale Verbindungen zu kontemporären Fundorten im Mittelmeerraum überprüft. Darüber hinaus erfolgt - basierend auf den Ergebnissen der Fundanalyse sowie der Auswertung von Schriftquellen - die Einbindung der Anlage in den historischen Kontext der späten römischen Republik und frühen Kaiserzeit, besonders im Zusammenhang mit der Eroberung des Mittelmeerraums und der Konsolidierung der römischen Vorherrschaft dort.

About the Author
REGINE MÜLLER studied Early- and Prehistorical Archaeology, Medieval History and Philosophy at the Justus-Liebig-University in Giessen. Her Magister thesis encompassed the archaeological analyses of the early medieval graveyard of Sindelsdorf, district of Weilheim-Schongau. The author participated at the excavations of the Roman military fort in Sanisera, Menorca for several years. Resulting from this, the study of the site’s lead objects within the frame of a PhD thesis at the Goethe-University in Frankfurt was undertaken. She still researches isotope analyses of lead slingshots and has been working for several years now as an archaeologist in Germany.

REGINE MÜLLER hat an der Justus-Liebig-Universität in Gießen Vor- und Frühgeschichte, Mittlere Geschichte und Philosophie studiert. Ihre Magisterarbeit behandelte die archäologische Analyse des frühmittelalterlichen Gräberfeldes von Sindelsdorf, Kr. Weilheim-Schongau. Aus der mehrjährigen Grabungstätigkeit in der römischen Militäranlage von Sanisera im Norden Menorcas ging die vorliegende Untersuchung zu deren Bleifunden im Rahmen einer Dissertation an der Goethe-Universität-Frankfurt hervor. Die Studien zur Bleiisotopenanalyse, vornehmlich von Schleuderbleien, setzte sie auch im Anschluss an die Dissertation weiter fort. Seit mehreren Jahren ist sie in Deutschland als Archäologin tätig.
Roman Funerary Monuments of South-Western Pannonia in their Material, Social, and Religious Context by Branka Migotti, Marjeta Šašel Kos and Ivan Radman-Livaja. Paperback; 205x290; ix+276 pages; 308 figures (133 plates in colour). 476 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 45. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690217. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690224. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book has come about as a result of the project Roman Funerary Monuments of South-Western Pannonia in their Material, Social, and Religious Context, unfolding between 2015 and 2018 in the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts under the auspices of the Croatian Science Foundation, with B. Migotti as the project leader and M. Šašel Kos and I. Radman-Livaja as collaborators.

Roman Funerary Monuments of South-Western Pannonia in their Material, Social, and Religious Context examines around two hundred funerary monuments and fragments (stelai, sarcophagi, ash-chests, tituli, altars, medallions and buildings) from three Roman cities in the south-west part of the Roman province of Pannonia in the territory of north-west Croatia: colonia Siscia (Sisak) and municipia Andautonia (Ščitarjevo) and Aquae Balissae (Daruvar). A juxtaposition of the evidence from three administrative units of different dimensions and municipal profiles, and of unequal importance in the wider area, offered a good opportunity for a meaningful comparison of the main components for a reconstruction of material, social and cultural components of the three Romano-provincial communities. The components studied were: 1 – territorial scope of the individual cities; 2 – quantification of the monuments in terms of kinds and chronology; 3 – structural typology and iconography; 4 – social aspects of the monument use; 5 – ritual and religious aspects (incineration vs. inhumation, classical religion vs. Christianity); 6 – geo-archaeological aspect. The most valuable contributions have been achieved in the geo-archaeological field, as such research had never been carried out in the studied area before.

About the Authors
Branka Migotti was born in Zagreb (Croatia) in 1954 and took the following degrees from the Faculty of Philosophy of the Zagreb University: BA in Archaeology and the English Language in 1978, MA in 1985 and PhD in 1992, both in the field of early Christian archaeology of Dalmatia. She is currently employed at the Division of Archaeology of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts in Zagreb as a scholarly consultant and Head of the Division, and she is a regular collaborator in the postgraduate study programme ‘Roman and early Christian archaeology’ at the Faculty of Philosophy in Zagreb. Her main fields of scholarly interests are early Christianity and the funerary archaeology of Pannonia, with emphasis on funerary monuments as evidence for social, material and religious aspects of life in the Roman province.

Marjeta Šašel Kos was born in Ljubljana (Slovenia) in 1952 and took the following degrees from the Faculty of Philosophy of the Ljubljana University: BA in ancient Greek and Archaeology in 1973 and 1974, respectively, MA in 1980 and PhD in 1986, both in the subject of Roman political history in the western Balkans as reflected in the works of the historians Cassius Dio and Herodian. She is currently employed at the Institute of Archaeology of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts as an academic adviser. She is member of the committee of the ‘Association Internationale d’Épigraphie Grecque et Latine’. Since 2005 she is a member of the Scientific Management Committee within the European Project ‘History and Archaeology of the Balkans’, coordinated by the University of Lyon. Her main fields of scholarly interests are the study of Roman political and religious history on the basis of written sources and epigraphic and onomastic evidence, mostly focused on the area of the western Balkans.

Ivan Radman-Livaja was born in Split (Croatia) in 1973, and took the following degrees from the Faculty of Philosophy of the Zagreb University: BA in Archaeology in 1996 and MA in 2002, the latter in the field of Roman military equipment in the Archaeological Museum in Zagreb. He took his doctor’s degree in Ancient History and Archaeology from the École Pratique des Hautes Études (Paris) in 20
Introduzione alle antichità di Ventotene Ricerche archeologiche nell’isola di Ventotene 1 by Giovanni Maria De Rossi and Salvatore Medaglia. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+120 pages; 158 figures (81 plates in colour). Italian text. 469 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 44. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690170. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690187. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Ventotene is a small island located in the Tyrrhenian sea, known in Antiquity as Pandateria. The site hosts the ruins of a large Roman villa for otium dated to the Augustan age where, during the first century AD, many women related to imperial families were exiled and enclosed. Notable figures exiled to Ventotene include Agrippina the Elder, Julia Livilla and Claudia Octavia, amongst others. This volume is an introduction to the roman antiquities of the island and is the first of a series of thematic monographs dedicated to the island. The first part of the book offers a brief overview of the geology of the island and reviews the studies and archaeological excavations carried out in Ventotene since the 18th century. The central part of the monograph is dedicated to the reconstruction of the historical events that have affected the island and to the development of the archaeological topography of the Roman age. The final chapter examines the numerous underwater archaeological discoveries made in the waters surrounding the island.

Ventotene è una piccola isola del medio Tirreno conosciuta nell’antichità con il nome di Pandateria. In questo luogo si conservano gli imponenti resti di una villa romana di età augustea destinata all’otium. Nel corso del I sec. d.C. l’isola funse da luogo di prigionia per una serie di donne legate alla famiglia imperiale che vi furono mandate in esilio. La prima di esse fu, nel 2 a.C., Giulia: era stata accusata di impudicizia sulla base della ‘Lex Iulia de adulteriis coercendis’ e rimase nell’isola con sua madre Scribonia, che la seguì volontariamente, fino al 3 d.C. Nel 29 d.C. la relagatio ad insulam toccò ad Agrippina Maggiore esiliata su ordine di Tiberio: la figlia di Giulia e di Vipsanio Agrippa morì a Ventotene nel 33 d.C. e le sue spoglie furono recuperate e riportate in pompa magna a Roma da Caligola nel 37 d.C. Dal 39 al 41 d.C. l’imperatore Caligola confinò a Pandateria sua sorella Iulia Livilla. Nel 62 d.C. Nerone mandò in esilio a Ventotene Ottavia, sua prima moglie, che vi morì solo pochi giorni dopo. L’ultima esiliata fu, nel 95 d.C., Flavia Domitilla, nipote di Domiziano, accusata di giudaismo. Questo volume costituisce un’introduzione alle antichità romane di Ventotene ed è il primo di una serie contributi monografici dedicati da Archaeopress Publishing al patrimonio archeologico isolano. Nella prima parte del libro si offre una breve panoramica sulla geologia e sulla storia degli studi e degli scavi che hanno interessato Ventotene sin dal XVIII secolo. La parte centrale della monografia è dedicata alla ricostruzione dei tempi e dei modi che hanno caratterizzato lo sviluppo insediamentale dell’isola e si fornisce un esauriente quadro della topografia di età imperiale. Il capitolo finale prende in esame le numerose testimonianze archeologiche recuperate nelle acque che circondano Ventotene.

About the Authors
Giovanni Maria De Rossi (Rome, 1942), Professor of Topography of ancient Italy at University of Salerno, has published many books about ancient and medieval Topography. He has directed archaelogical excavations in Italy; he conceived and designed the Archaeological Park and Historical and Archaeological Museum in Ventotene island; he has directed, in Ventotene, the archaeological excavations and, for twenty years, the Museum. | Giovanni Maria De Rossi (Roma, 1942), Professore Ordinario di Topografia dell’Italia Antica presso l’Università di Salerno, è autore di molte pubblicazioni scientifiche di Topografia antica e medievale. Ha diretto numerosi scavi in Italia. Ha ideato il Parco Archeologico e il Museo Storico Archeologico dell’Isola di Ventotene, dirigendo, nell’isola, gli scavi e, per 20 anni, il Museo.

Salvatore Medaglia (Crotone, 1971) is a classical archaeologist. He holds a PhD in Ancient Topography from the University of Salento and a joint Post-PhD in Landscape Archaeology at the University of Calabria and the University o
At the Crossroads of Greco-Roman History, Culture, and Religion Papers in Memory of Carin M. C. Green edited by Sinclair W. Bell and Lora L. Holland. Paperback; 175x245mm; xxiv+276 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 3 plates in colour. 468 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690132. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690149. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

At the Crossroads of Greco-Roman History, Culture, and Religion brings together recent research from a range of upcoming and well-established scholars to demonstrate the richness of the cross-cultural exchange of ideas around the ancient Mediterranean along with the reception of and continuing dialogues with these ideas in the medieval and modern worlds. The crossroads theme both honours the memory of our late colleague and friend Carin M. C. Green, who published an important book on the cult of Diana—one of whose aspects was Trivia, the goddess of crossroads—and emphasizes how each encounter of new topic or genre forces the reader to pause and think before proceeding down the new path.

The contents are arranged accordingly under three headings: (1) Greek philosophy, history, and historiography; (2) Latin literature, history, and historiography; and (3) Greco-Roman material culture, religion, and literature. These papers also coincide in myriad ways across the three headings, tracing themes such as friendship, leadership, and the reception of ideas in the arenas of philosophy, historiography, manuscript studies, poetry, medicine, art, and war. Within this delimited framework, the volume’s diversity of topics and approaches to a range of genres in the Greco- Roman world is intended both to appeal to the general scholar with varied interests and to offer students a wide scope through which to consider those genres.

About the Editors
SINCLAIR W. BELL is a classical archaeologist and art historian who teaches at Northern Illinois University. He is the co-editor of ten books, the Associate Editor of Etruscan and Italic Studies, and the author of numerous works on Etruscan and Roman art and archaeology. He is a recipient of fellowships from the American Academy in Rome, the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst, and the George A. and Eliza Gardner Howard Foundation.

LORA L. HOLLAND chairs the department of Classics at the University of North Carolina at Asheville. Her main area of research is the religions of the Roman Republic but she has published on a wide range of topics, including Greek tragedy, Roman comedy, and the history of women in Roman religion. She is a former Blegen Research Fellow at Vassar College, Visiting Fellow in Greek and Roman Religion at the Center for Hellenic Studies, and Visiting Scholar at the American Academy in Rome.
How Did the Persian King of Kings Get his Wine? The upper Tigris in antiquity (c.700 BCE to 636 CE) by Anthony Comfort and Michał Marciak. Paperback; 175x245mm; iv+148 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (46 plates in colour). (Print RRP £32.00). 457 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919566. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919573. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

How did the Persian King of Kings Get His Wine? the upper Tigris in antiquity (c.700 BCE to 636 CE) explores the upper valley of the Tigris during antiquity. The area is little known to scholarship, and study is currently handicapped by the security situation in southeast Turkey and by the completion during 2018 of the Ilısu dam. The reservoir being created will drown a large part of the valley and will destroy many archaeological sites, some of which have not been investigated. The course of the upper Tigris discussed here is the section from Mosul up to its source north of Diyarbakır; the monograph describes the history of the river valley from the end of the Late Assyrian empire through to the Arab conquests, thus including the conflicts between Rome and Persia. It considers the transport network by river and road and provides an assessment of the damage to cultural heritage caused both by the Saddam dam (also known as the Eski Mosul dam) in Iraq and by the Ilısu dam in south-east Turkey. A catalogue describes the sites important during the long period under review in and around the valley. During the period reviewed this area was strategically important for Assyria’s relations with its northern neighbours, for the Hellenistic world’s relations with Persia and for Roman relations with first the kingdom of Parthia and then with Sassanian Persia.

About the Authors
ANTHONY COMFORT is an independent scholar associated with the Centre for the Study of Greek and Roman Antiquity at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. After a career in the secretariat of the European Parliament, he completed a doctoral dissertation dealing with the roads on the frontier between Rome and Persia at Exeter University under the supervision of Stephen Mitchell. He is a specialist in the use of satellite imagery for archaeology in the Middle East but is now responsible for a project concerning the Roman roads of south-west France, where he lives.

MICHAL MARCIAK, PhD (2012), Leiden University, is an Assistant Professor at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków (Poland). He has published extensively on Northern Mesopotamia, including two monographs Izates, Helena, and Monobazos of Adiabene (Harrassowitz, 2014) and Sophene, Gordyene, and Adiabene: Three Regna Minora of Northern Mesopotamia Between East and West (Brill, 2017). He is currently also the Principal Investigator of the Gaugamela Project (in cooperation with the Land of Nineveh Archaeological Project of the University of Udine, Italy) which is dedicated to the identification of the site of the Battle of Gaugamela (331 BCE).
The Roman Pottery Manufacturing Site in Highgate Wood: Excavations 1966-78 by A E Brown and H L Sheldon. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+392 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (70 plates in colour). (Print RRP £60.00). 456 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 43. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919788. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919795. Book contents pageDownload

Excavations over a period of eight years uncovered at least ten pottery kilns, waster heaps, ditches and pits, but only a few definite structures. The pottery from the site indicates a period of operation extending from the first half of the 1st century AD to the later 2nd century. The pottery made at the site included initially a vegetable tempered handmade ware, but subsequently the bulk of it consisted of a grog tempered ware and then pottery in a sandy fabric which is well known from assemblages in London. The type of kiln varied with the pottery fabric; there was possible evidence for a pre-Roman pit firing, and later kilns set in ditches were of the twin flued type, eventually replaced by the more familiar above ground kilns with raised floors. Changes in pottery fabric were reflected in different methods of clay preparation, which led to changes in the function of the various ditches, the stratigraphy of which, along with the variation in the fabrics, was significant in enabling the four broad phases into which the site has been divided, to be proposed.

The report includes a very detailed analysis of the forms and fabrics of the pottery made at Highgate. Finds of prehistoric flintwork and pottery during the excavation, and of material of later date, together with the observation of earthworks and historical research, have been used to show the place of the pottery kilns as an element in the exploitation of the woodland of northern London over the last eight thousand years.

In addition to the full eBook being available as a free download in Open Access (click 'Download (pdf)' further down this page), these web pages take the published pottery illustrations, but rearrange them by their typological category rather than their archaeological context. This allows the full spectrum of Highgate pottery forms across all phases of the site to be compared, and parallels for vessels of possible Highgate origin from domestic sites can be identified.


About the Authors
TONY BROWN was a member of the academic staff of the University of Leicester for over thirty years, moving there in 1964 as an Assistant Staff Tutor (Organising Tutor for Leicestershire). In 1966 he became Organising Tutor for Northamptonshire and in 1968 Staff Tutor in Archaeology. From 1990 he held a joint appointment with the School of Archaeological Studies, retiring in 2001 as an Emeritus Reader.
Papers in Italian Archaeology VII: The Archaeology of Death Proceedings of the Seventh Conference of Italian Archaeology held at the National University of Ireland, Galway, April 16-18, 2016 edited by Edward Herring & Eòin O’Donoghue. Paperback; 205x290mm; 504pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 435 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919214. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919221. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £80.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Archaeology of Death: Proceedings of the Seventh Conference of Italian Archaeology held at the National University of Ireland, Galway, April 16-18, 2016 includes more than 60 papers, with contributors from the British Isles, Italy and other parts of continental Europe, and North and South America, which consider recent developments in Italian archaeology from the Neolithic to the modern period. Each region of Italy is represented, with specific sections of the volume devoted to Etruria, South Italy, and Sicily. Other sections have a chronological focus, including Italian Prehistory, the Roman period, and Post Antiquity. Following the primary theme of the meeting, the majority of papers revolve around the archaeology of death; numerous contributions analyse the cultural significance of death through examinations of funerary rituals and mortuary practices, while others analyse burial data for evidence of wider social and political change. Various papers consider new and recent discoveries in Italian archaeology, while others ask fresh questions of older datasets. In addition, a number of contributions showcase their employment of new methodologies deriving from technological innovations. The volume opens with a dedicatory section to mark the achievements of the Accordia Research Institute, and to celebrate the careers of two of its founders, Ruth Whitehouse and John Wilkins.

About the Editors
EDWARD HERRING is Senior Lecturer in Classics at National University of Ireland, Galway. His principal research area is the archaeology of South Italy in the first millennium BC. A Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries since 2006, he held the A.D. Trendall Fellowship at the Institute of Classical Studies in London in 2011. His publications include Explaining Change in the Matt-Painted Pottery of Southern Italy (Oxford, 1998), (with R.D. Whitehouse and J.B. Wilkins) Botromagno. Excavation and Survey at Gravina in Puglia, 1979-1985 (London, 2000), and Patterns in the Production of Apulian Red-Figure Pottery (Newcastle, 2018).

Eóin O’Donoghue is based in the Department of Classics at Brock University, Canada. He specialises in Etruscan and Roman archaeology and excavates at Murlo with the Poggio Civitate Excavation Project and on the island of Pantelleria with the Brock University Archaeological Project at Pantelleria.
Verres incolores de L’antiquité romaine en Gaule et aux marges de la Gaule by Danièle Foy, Françoise Labaune-Jean, Caroline Leblond, Chantal Martin Pruvot, Marie-Thérèse Marty, Claire Massart, Claudine Munier, Laudine Robin and Janick Roussel-Ode. Two volume set; Paperback; 205x290mm; xliv+738 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 118 colour plates. French text with English abstract. (Print RRP £130.00). 348 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 42. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918972. £130.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918989. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £130.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Colourless glass became prominent between the middle of the 1st century AD and the beginning of the 4th century. This book reflects the diversity of glass and is designed as a practical manual divided into three parts: Assemblages, Typological Catalogue, Chemical Analyses.

The first presents contexts in which colourless glass has been found; the second, in the form of index cards, is a typological catalogue which gives an overall picture of the colourless glassware found throughout Gaul; glass is highly useful as a dating tool but also tells us much about the economic, social and cultural aspects of its time. Chemical analyses form the third component.

The volume of material gathered in this book makes it an indispensable working tool for researchers and students interested in the glassware of Roman antiquity.

A collective work by multiple scholars, this book results from an investigation initiated and mainly supported by the French Association for Glass Archaeology (Association française pour l’Archéologie du Verre) to which most of the authors belong as well as being attached to various research institutions.

Le verre incolore, volontairement décoloré au manganèse ou à l’antimoine, est celui qui est le plus souvent utilisé entre le milieu du Ier s. apr. J.-C. et le début du IVe s. Verres incolores de L’antiquité romaine en Gaule et aux marges de la Gaule rend compte de la diversité de ce mobilier (vaisselle, contenants et petits objets) est conçu comme un manuel pratique divisé en trois parties. La première présente des contextes renfermant du verre incolore ; la seconde, sous forme de fiches, est un catalogue typologique qui livre une image globale de la verrerie incolore découverte dans l’ensemble de la Gaule. Outil de datation, le verre nous informe aussi sur les aspects économiques, sociaux et culturels de son époque. Les analyses chimiques forment le troisième volet.

La masse documentaire réunie dans cet ouvrage en fait un instrument de travail indispensable aux chercheurs et étudiants qui s’intéressent au verre de l’Antiquité romaine.

Fruit d’un travail collectif, cet ouvrage résulte d’une enquête initiée et principalement supportée par l’Association française pour l’Archéologie du Verre (AFAV) à laquelle appartiennent la plupart des auteurs qui, par ailleurs, sont rattachés à divers organismes de recherche. L’AFAV qui publie régulièrement dans un bulletin les travaux de ses rencontres annuelles est également organisatrice de colloques internationaux et éditrice scientifique.
Representations of Animals on Greek and Roman Engraved Gems Meanings and interpretations by Idit Sagiv. Paperback; 175x245mm; vi+198 pages; 98 illustrations (51 plates in colour). (Print RRP £35.00). 439 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918699. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918705. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Whereas animals are a frequent depiction on gemstones within the Greek and Roman periods, and play a key role in symbolic representations on these engraved gems, they have generally been overlooked with little in the way of focussed academic study.

In the present research, a large group of Greek and Roman gems (intaglios) bearing depictions of animals was selected. The gems are presented through a detailed study of the themes described in an attempt to form a comprehensive approach to the depictions of animals and their significance on Greek and Roman gems. The work examines the associations between animal depictions and the type of gemstone and its believed qualities. The study also discusses the changes in representation of animals on gems compared to other, larger media, and questions the significance of these changes. It is concluded here that as far as animal motifs are concerned, the gems could be accorded with a deeper symbolism, such as good luck, abundance and fertility, health, success, and victory. All these motifs are perceived as capable of weakening hostile forces. The animals engraved can also symbolise nature's abundance and fertility, especially when represented along with their offspring, pasturing and grazing, or accompanied by such fertility symbols as cornucopia, ears of corn, and wine goblets. Other animals are related to certain gods, and even comprise their attributes, and thus it was believed that the owner of an engraved gem was accorded divine protection.

About the Author
Dr. Idit Sagiv is a researcher of Classical Art. She completed her MA and PhD studies at Tel Aviv University. Her research and publications focus on Greek and Roman engraved gems. Since 2016, she is an academic member of the History of Art Department, Tel-Aviv University, where she teaches courses on Classical Art.
Hercules’ Sanctuary in the Quarter of St Theodore, Pula by Alka Starac. Paperback; vi+126 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (42 colour plates). 431 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 40. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918736. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918743. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Hercules’ Sanctuary in the Quarter of St. Theodore in Pula deals with many aspects of the Roman sanctuary erected at the spring in Pula as well as with objects of cult dated to the Hellenistic period. The site was in use from the late fourth century BC to the fall of the Western Roman Empire, a date that approximately coincides with the demolition of the temple. Research focuses on Roman foundations which trace the ground plan of the temple that was surrounded by portico. Architectural fragments found at the site, as well as those kept in the collection of Pula Museum, were used to form proposals for a hypothetical reconstruction of the temple. The discovery of a relief club is the only reliable link with a particular deity i.e. Hercules. The continuity of the cult of Hercules has been recognised at the spring from the Histrian to Roman periods. Hercules was considered a founder and patron of the Roman colony of Pola. Nearness of the assumed umbilicus of the colony offers additional reasons to reconsider sacred rituals of the foundation of the colony. Traces of ritual desacralization, purification and storing of sacrificial remnants could be recognised at the site. A hypothetical reconstruction of the Roman sanctuary is followed by calculations of construction costs.

About the Author
ALKA STARAC (born 15 April 1966 in Pula) defended PhD thesis Roman Rule in Histria and Liburnia in 1996 at the University of Zagreb, Faculty of Philosophy. During her studies, Alka obtained Rector’s award of the Faculty of Philosophy in Zagreb for year 1986/1987. She was the winner of scholarship of CNRS France for scholarly research (duration six months) at Centre Pierre Paris, Bordeaux, in 1994. She worked as Head of Roman Archaeology Department and was senior curator in the Archaeological Museum of Istria, Pula (Croatia) and at the University of Juraj Dobrila, Pula. She is the author of some eighty scholarly papers published in archaeological journals with international review, as well as of eight monographs and of exhibitions in the field of Roman archaeology, epigraphy, history and economy.
Estudios sobre el África romana Culturas e Imaginarios en transformación edited by Fabiola Salcedo Garcés with Estefanía Benito Lázaro and Sergio España-Chamorro. Paperback; 205x290mm; xvi+352 pages; illustrated throughout black & white with 2 plates in colour. Spanish text with English preface and abstracts. 430 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 39. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919078. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919085. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £44.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This collective work, carried out by both senior and beginning researchers, is for those scholars who have their gaze fixed on the fascinating mosaic of cultures that was the North-African world from the moment Rome appeared in the region. Even before this date, the arrival of Phoenicians on the continent and their subsequent spread throughout the north of it, initiated a rich process of contacts, interchanges and relations with the Libyan-Berber populations that inhabited the zone from time immemorial. To this scene of ancient cultural diversity –which also included an Egyptian component– Rome brought its own riches, generating in the region new episodes of cultural and religious syncretism.

All these subjects are treated in the present book through some specific scientific contributions whose geopolitical frame is the whole Proconsular Africa. Most of the articles in this volume are dedicated to the world of images, but others also treat many other issues as Historiography, Archaeology of Architecture, Libyan-Berber ethnicities and even cultural parallels between North Africa and the Iberian Peninsula.

About the Editors
FABIOLA SALCEDO GARCÉS is Professor of Classical Archaeology at the Complutense University of Madrid. In 1991 she moved to Rome to write her doctoral thesis about the Iconography of the Roman provinces, in particular, the province of Africa, at the Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología de Roma (EEHAR, CSIC). The result of that research was the book Africa. Iconografía de una provin¬cia romana (Rome-Madrid, CSIC, 1996). During her long stay in Rome, she began to work in the Tusculum project, developed also by the EEHAR, as well as the Soprintendenza Archeologica per il Lazio. In this case, she was specifically devoted to the study of the collection of sculptural materials belonging to the city and to the villas of the Tusculan surroundings. Due to this research she published the volume Tusculana Marmora. Escultura clásica en el antiguo Tusculano (CSIC, Madrid, 2016). She has worked in Pompeii («Casa de la Diana Arcaizante» project) and she currently directs several investigations focusing on Roman Africa studies. Her works have been diffused in prestigious publications, internationally (Ostraka, Antiquités Africaines, LIMC), and nationally (Archivo Español de Arque¬ología, Lucentum, Studia Historica, Iberia, among others).

ESTEFANÍA BENITO LÁZARO is researcher of the Arqueología Africana Group and of others investigation projects developed at the Complutense University of Madrid. She is specialist in the Libyan-Berber world, subject to which she dedicates her current doctoral thesis. She has carried out several stays of research in Tunisia and in relevant scientific European institutions, as the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) and the Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma (EEHAR, CSIC).

SERGIO ESPAÑA CHAMORRO is Doctor in Ancient World Studies by the Complutense University of Madrid. He currently works as postdoctoral researcher at the Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma (EEHAR, CSIC) and Associated Professor of the Isabel I University. His investigations are focused on Landscape Archaeology in the Baetica, Africa and Italy, besides his participation in research projects on domestic spaces in Pompeii and the Roman sculpture of Carthage. He has also worked in prestigious scientific institutions, as the University of Southampton, the centre CIL of the Berlin-Brandenburgischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, the “Aldo Moro” University of Bari and the Musei dei Fori Imperiali-Mercati di Traiano (Rome).

Spanish Description
Esta obra colectiva, llevada a cabo por investigadores seniors y jóvenes, va dirigida a aquellos estudiosos con la mirada puesta en el fascinante mosaico de culturas que fue el mundo norteafricano cuando Roma hizo su aparición en la región. Ya antes de esa fecha, la llegada de fenicios
Wealthy or Not in a Time of Turmoil? The Roman Imperial Hoard from Gruia in Roman Dacia (Romania) by Cristian Gazdac and Marin Neagoe. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+182 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 414 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918477. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918484. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Roman imperial hoard from Gruia, Romania (former Roman province of Dacia) is among the largest ever discovered in this part of the Roman Empire. 1,509 silver coins dated from Vespasian to Gordian III were accidentally discovered while digging in a private garden. Wealthy or not in a Time of Turmoil? The Roman Imperial hoard from Gruia in Roman Dacia (Romania) presents a catalogue of each of these coins, photos included, with their complete descriptions. A comparative analysis with other similar hoards throughout the Roman Empire reveals general and specific patterns for hoarding in this period.

At the same time, looking at the prices and salaries around the time the hoard was buried, the authors aim to establish whether such an amount of silver coins could have represented someone’s entire wealth. In addition, analysing the distribution of hoards in the provinces from the Middle and Lower Danube and the history of this area, some possible reasons for concealing and not recovering this hoard are discussed.

One excited aspect emphasised in this book is the presentation of so the called ‘weird’ coins meaning those pieces that have been minted with various errors, by mistake or deliberately, such as engraving errors, coin-die malfunction, plated coins etc.

About the Authors
CRISTIAN GAZDAC is a researcher at the Institute of Archaeology and Art History of the Romanian Academy in Cluj-Napoca. As Associated Professor Habilitus at the University of Cluj-Napoca (Romania), Faculty of History and Philosophy, he teaches on the Roman Economy and Numismatics and on the Analysis of Military Conflicts in Antiquity. Since 2014, he supervises PhD dissertations at the Doctoral School of Security Studies within the same university. In 2017, he joined the team working on the research project Coin Hoards of the Roman Empire at the University of Oxford. He is the editor and the main author of the monographic series Coins from Roman Sites and Collections of Roman Coins from Romania (13 volumes).

MARIN NEAGOE is a researcher and the keeper of the numismatic collection at the Museum of the Iron Gates Region, Drobeta-Turnu Severin (Romania). He has a large experience as a field archaeologist covering the periods from Prehistory to Middle Ages. Among his most important excavations are the Severin Chester (2011-2012) and the amphitheatre near the auxiliary fort of Drobeta (2013-2017). His recently defended PhD dissertation is an archaeological and numismatic monograph on the Chester of Severin and its hinterland during 13th-16th centuries.