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NEW: Different Times? Archaeological and Environmental Data from Intra-Site and Off-Site Sequences Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 4, Session II-8 edited by Zoï Tsirtsoni, Catherine Kuzucuoğlu, Philippe Nondédéo, Olivier Weller. Paperback; 205x290mm; 136 pages; 39 figures, 10 tables (colour throughout). Papers in English and French. Print RRP: £32.00. 642 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696516. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696523. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

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Different Times? Archaeological and environmental data from intra-site and off-site sequences brings together seven papers from Session II-8 of the XVIII UISPP Congress (Paris, 4-9 June 2018). The session questioned temporal correlations between intra-site and off-site data in archaeology-related contexts. The word ‘site’ describes here archaeological sites or groups of sites – usually settlements – that have undergone research in recent years and produced information on the duration and timing of human presence. Comparison with evidence from geomorphological and paleoenvironmental research conducted at various distances from settlements gives some interesting results, such as ‘missing’ occupation periods, distortions in human presence intensity through space as well as time, variability in explanations concerning the abandonment of settlements, etc. Examples presented here highlight: first, discrepancies between time records within built areas used for living and the surrounding lands used for other activities (cultivation, herding, travelling, etc); second, discrepancies produced by the use of different ‘time markers’ (ie. chronostratigraphy of archaeological layers or pottery evolution on the one hand, sedimentary or pollen sequences on the other hand). Although improving the resolution of individual data is essential, the authors argue that the joint and detailed examination of evidence produced together by human and natural scientists is more important for reaching a reliable reconstruction of past people’s activities. Both the session and the volume stem from the Working Group ‘Environmental and Social Changes in the Past’ (Changements environnementaux et sociétés dans le passé) in the research framework of the Cluster of Excellence ‘Dynamite’ (Territorial and Spatial Dynamics) of the University Paris 1-Panthéon-Sorbonne (ANR-11-LABX-0046, Investissements d’Avenir).

About the Editors
Zoï Tsirtsoni is an archaeologist and researcher at CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique), currently in position at the laboratory Archéologies et Sciences de l’Antiquité at Nanterre. She is a specialist in Aegean and Balkan prehistory and co-director, since 2008, of the Greek-French research project at the tell settlement of Dikili Tash in Greek Eastern Macedonia. Concerned with relative and absolute chronology, crafts (especially pottery), settlement, and problems of archaeological visibility, she has coordinated or participated in several collaborative interdisciplinary research projects (e.g. ANR ‘Balkans 4000’, ERC ‘PlantCult’), already published or in progress.

Catherine Kuzucuoğlu is a geomorphologist at CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique). Working in the fields of physical geography, geoarchaeology, volcanism and reconstruction of past climates and environments, she develops collaboration research programs with Turkish and international teams in Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Anatolia, investigating (1) Pleistocene and Holocene evolution of valleys and lakes, (2) geomorphological records of recent volcanic activity and landscape evolution, (3) reconstructions of climate and environment from lake and marsh records, and their impacts on past civilizations. She has been Deputy Director in charge of Archaeology at French Institute for Anatolian Studies in Istanbul (2000- 2003), and Director of Laboratory of Physical Geography (2009-2013).

Philippe Nondédéo is currently an investigator at the CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Sc
NEW: EurASEAA14 Volume II: Material Culture and Heritage Papers from the Fourteenth International Conference of the European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists edited by Helen Lewis. Paperback; 203x276mm; 238 pages; 164 figures, 27 tables. 115 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695939. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695946. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

EurASEAA14: Material Culture and Heritage is the second of two volumes comprising papers originally presented at the EurASEAA14 (European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists) conference in 2012, updated for publication. The aim of the EurASEAA is to facilitate communication between different disciplines, to present current work in the field, and to stimulate future research. This international initiative aims to foster international scholarly cooperation in the field of Southeast Asian archaeology, art history and philology.

This volume focuses substantially on topics under the broad themes of archaeology and heritage, material culture, environmental archaeology, osteoarchaeology, historic and prehistoric archaeology, ethnoarchaeology, and long-distance contact, trade and exchange.

About the Editor
Helen Lewis is an associate professor at University College Dublin School of Archaeology. Her research in Southeast Asia has mostly focused on cave sites in Laos, Malaysian Borneo, and the Philippine island of Palawan, where she co-directs the Palawan Island Palaeohistory Research Project. She chaired the EurASEAA14 Conference in Dublin in 2012.

Table of Contents (provisional)
Editorial introduction to EurASEAA14 Volumes 1 and 2 – Helen Lewis ;
Ceramics from the Musi riverbed – John N. Miksic ;
The social dynamics of porcelain trade in the eleventh to sixteenth centuries CE Philippines: a chemical composition study – Rory Dennison and Laura Junker ;
The kilns of Myinkaba – for pottery or glass? – Don Hein and W. Ross H. Ramsay ;
The iron smelting technology of the Bujang Valley, Malaysia – Naizatul Akma Mokhtar and Mokhtar Saidin ;
Guide to understanding Khmer stoneware characteristics, Angkor, Cambodia – Chhay Rachna, Tho Thon and Em Socheata ;
New data on the chronology of Khmer stonewares – Armand Desbat ;
The conical rollers of Ban Non Wat, northeastern Thailand – Christina Sewall ;
Late Pleistocene/Holocene ecological and cultural transition in the Philippines – Jonathan H. Kress ;
Middle Pleistocene sites in Bukit Bunuh, Lenggong, Perak, Malaysia – Nor Khairunnisa Talib, Mokhtar Saidin and Jeffrey Abdullah ;
Metabolism, mythology, magic or metaphor? Animals in the rock art of Thailand – Lauren Winch ;
Tooth blackening and betel nut chewing at the Early Iron Age sites of Gò Ô Chùa (Vietnam) and Prohear (Cambodia) – Simone Krais, Michael Francken and Andreas Reinecke ;
The cultural and biological context of the Song Keplek 5 specimen, East Java: implications for living conditions and human-environment interactions during the later Holocene – Sofwan Noerwidi, Harry Widianto and Truman Simanjuntak ;
Probable prehistoric Southeast Asian influences in New Guinea? New archaeological and anthropological approaches to former axioms – Henry Dosedla ;
Ancient settlement in the lakes area of East Java Province, Indonesia: the potential for archaeological research with public benefits – Gunadi Kasnowihardjo ;
The relevance of archaeology to contemporary concerns: the Department of Agriculture of the Philippines and ancient foodways – Michelle S. Eusebio ;
Toward an understanding of cultural heritage and sustainable management: a case study from Phrae Province, Thailand – Mizuho Ikeda ;
Bibliography
NEW: Peintures et gravures rupestres des Amériques: Empreintes culturelles et territoriales Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 2, Session XXV-3 edited by Brigitte Faugère and Philippe Costa. Paperback; 205x290mm; 108 pages; 66 figures, 2 tables (colour throughout). French text. Print RRP: £28.00.. 639 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696332. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696349. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

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The rock art of the Americas was produced at very different times and by different cultures, both by hunter-gatherers, fishermen and by farmers from village or state societies. Each group can be characterised by diverse styles and techniques. The function of rock art depended on religious, political or social concerns that referred to a particular context and time. Peintures et gravures rupestres des Amériques: Empreintes culturelles et territoriales presents the proceedings from Session XXV-3 of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France). Papers address the following questions: How does the study of rock art make it possible to culturally characterize its authors? What does it tell us about the function of sites? How and under what circumstances does it make it possible to delimit a cultural territory? The six articles in this volume provide case studies from Mexico, El Salvador, Costa Rica, French Guiana and Chile.

Brigitte Faugère is a professor of archaeology at the University of Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. Since the 1990s, she has led research projects on the cultures of north-central and western Mexico, in particular in the field of rock art.

Philippe Costa is an archaeologist specializing in Central America and an associate researcher at the Center for Mexican and Central American Studies. Since 2018, he has directed a Franco-German-Costa Rican archaeological project in the Guanacaste mountain range of Costa Rica.

French Description:
L’art rupestre des Amériques a été produit à des époques et par des cultures très différentes, tant par les chasseurs cueilleurs pêcheurs que par les agriculteurs inscrits dans des sociétés villageoises ou étatiques. Chaque groupe ou société a développé des styles d’une grande diversité et utilisé des techniques différentes, qui les caractérisent. La fonction de l’art rupestre dépendait de préoccupations religieuses, politiques ou sociales qui se réfèrent à un contexte et à une époque particulière. Les questions qu’abordent ce symposium organisé lors du XVIIIe colloque annuel de l’IUSPP sont ainsi : En quoi l’étude de l’art rupestre permet-il de caractériser culturellement ses auteurs ? Que nous apprend-il sur la fonction des sites ? En quoi et dans quelles circonstances permet-il de délimiter un territoire culturel ? Les six articles que comptent ce volume permettent d’aborder des études de cas portant sur le Mexique, le Salvador, le Costa Rica, la Guyane française et le Chili. Même si des peintures rupestres sont connues dans tous ces pays, les études proposées dans ce volume concernent en majorité des gravures. Deux grandes options ont été choisies par les auteurs : s’intéresser à une tradition particulière et à sa fonction dans une région donnée (Philippe Costa pour le Salvador, Joseph Mountjoy pour l’Occident du Mexique, Felipe Sol pour le Costa Rica, Françoise Fauconnier pour le Chili) ou bien recenser les différentes traditions présentes sur un territoire et essayer d’interpréter leur diversité (B. Faugère pour le centre-nord du Mexique, Gérald Migeon pour la Guyane française).

Brigitte Faugère est archéologue spécialiste du Mexique et Professeur à l’Université Paris 1 Panthéon- Sorbonne. Elle dirige depuis les années 1990 des projets de recherche sur les cultures du centre-nord et de l’Occident du Mexique, en particulier dans le domaine de l’Art rupestre. Elle est membre sénior de l’Institut Universitaire de France.

Philippe Costa est archéologue spécialiste de l’Amérique Centrale et chercheur as
NEW: The Rock-Art Landscapes of Rombalds Moor, West Yorkshire Standing on Holy Ground by Vivien Deacon. Paperback; 205x290mm; 228 pages; 163 figures; 36 tables. 605 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694581. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694598. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This landscape study of the rock-art of Rombalds Moor, West Yorkshire, considers views of and from the sites. In an attempt to understand the rock-art landscapes of prehistory the study considered the environment of the moor and its archaeology along with the ethnography from the whole circumpolar region.

All the rock-art sites were visited, and the sites, motifs and views recorded. The data was analysed at four spatial scales, from the whole moor down to the individual rock. Several large prominent and impressive carved rocks, interpreted as natural monuments, were found to feature in the views from many much smaller rock-art sites. Several clusters of rock-art sites were identified. An alignment was also identified, composed of carved stones perhaps moved into position. Other perhaps-moved carved stones were also identified. The possibility that far-distant views might be significant was also indicated by some of the findings.

The physicality of carving arose as a major theme. The natural monuments are all difficult or dangerous to carve; conversely, the more common, simple sites mostly required the carver to kneel or crouch down. This, unexpectedly for British rock-art, raises comparisons with some North American rock-art, where some highly visible sites were carved by religious specialists, and others, inconspicuous and much smaller, were carved by ordinary people.

About the Author
Vivien Deacon is a Research Associate at the Department of Archaeology, University of York. Following a career in the NHS, she did a BA in Archaeology at York and went on to be awarded a PhD in 2018.

Table of Contents (Provisional)
Preface ;
Chapter One: Background to the study ;
Chapter Two: Encountering Rock-art ;
Chapter Three: Landscapes of Rock-art ;
Chapter Four: Rombalds Moor ;
Chapter Five: Methodology ;
Chapter Six: Results I - The Whole Moor ;
Chapter Seven: Results II - Natural Monuments in their Large Locales ;
Chapter Eight: Results III - Small Locales ;
Chapter Nine: Results IV - The individual carved rock ;
Chapter Ten: Discussion ;
Appendices
PRE-ORDER: Ice Without, Fire Within: A Life of Jacquetta Hawkes by Christine Finn. Hardback; further details tba. 614 2020 Archaeological Lives . ISBN 9781789695977. Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is expected to publish in Autumn 2020.
Click here to download the pre-order form and save 20%

Jacquetta Hawkes (1910-1996) was a pioneer in public archaeology: first as the wife of a notable prehistorian, Christopher Hawkes, and then as the wife of the notable playwright, JB Priestley, placing her at the heart of British postwar culture. By the time of her death, Hawkes’s own legacy appeared notably buried. When Christine Finn rescued her papers, she began what was to become a 25-year literary excavation of the many layers of Hawkes’s personal and professional past – so much of it defined by the men in her life.

The title of her biography, Ice Without, Fire Within: A Life of Jacquetta Hawkes, is in fact inspired by what Priestley said upon meeting her: ‘What a woman! Ice without and fire within’. This proved to be an astute observation of a complex woman who was, by turns, shy and distanced, yet passionate about the past, and in her personal life. With Priestley, Hawkes helped found CND, the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, and she campaigned for causes including countryside heritage and homosexual rights. Finn writes of a life lived beyond the discipline of traditional archaeology, and always with a nod to the past, Hawkes reaching her audiences not just through bestsellers, such as A Land, but through film, plays, journalism, in books for children, and an unexpected eroticism. She supported artists, and loved good clothes, and fine wine. Finn draws on her own background in both archaeology and journalism, to trace Hawkes’ legacy as a dig through what survives in her childhood notebooks, academic tomes, poetry fragments, typed scripts and hand-written talks, publisher correspondence and fan mail. She treads Hawkes’s landscapes from London to New Zealand, and sleeps inside her homes, revealing the effect of writing a biography-over-time on her own life. The long wait for her biography subject to be rediscovered by a new generation of archaeologists, and nature writers is vindicated in a growing interest in Jacquetta Hawkes. In 2012 A Land was reissued, with Robert Macfarlane, introducing it as ‘one of the defining British non-fiction books of the postwar decade. Sixty years on it reads, fascinatingly, as a missing link in the literature of nature and landscape’. Heralding a new readership for Hawkes, Finn suggests this awakening is timely. Hawkes’s deep motivation from the past was the future of an endangered planet.
Landscapes of Human Evolution: Contributions in Honour of John Gowlett edited by James Cole, John McNabb, Matt Grove and Rob Hosfield. Paperback; 205x290mm; 204 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white.. 607 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693799. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693805. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Landscapes of Human Evolution is an edited volume in honour of John Gowlett. John has a wide range of research interests primarily focused on the human genus Homo, and is a world leader in understanding the cognitive and behavioural preconditions necessary for the emergence of complex behaviours such as language and art. John is also a leader in investigating the early history of fire use and control in relation to social action and hominin communication. Landscapes of Human Evolution seeks to mirror John’s research profile and explores some of the most recent thinking regarding human evolution from the biological and cognitive development of our human ancestors, to the behavioural adaptations necessary to survive changing Pleistocene landscapes and environments. Specifically, Landscapes of Human Evolution focuses on the development of large hominin brains and bipedal locomotion; hominin interactions with landscape; and the amplification of complex hominin behaviours and social structures from the control of fire through to changing lithic technologies. Such an overview of the development of human ancestral species from a biological, cognitive, social, and behavioural perspective is particularly timely given the many recent advances in our understanding of the complexities of human evolution.

About the editors
James Cole is Principal Lecturer in Archaeology at the University of Brighton. He has undertaken Palaeolithic fieldwork in the UK, Albania, Greece, Kenya and Tanzania; and his research focuses on the Lower and early Middle Palaeolithic (Europe) and Early and Middle Stone Age (Africa). He is particularly interested in interpreting hominin behaviours from the material culture record in regards to understanding cognitive ability and potential.

John McNabb is Senior Lecturer in Palaeolithic Archaeology at the University of Southampton. He has undertaken Palaeolithic fieldwork in the UK, Greece, South Africa and Tanzania. His research interests explore the meaning of stone tool variability in the African and European Palaeolithic, and what that might mean for social and cognitive evolution. He has researched the history of human origins research, in particular as it was reflected in Victorian and Edwardian fiction.

Matt Grove is Reader in Evolutionary Anthropology in the Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology at the University of Liverpool. His research examines the impact of climatic change and variability on human evolution, with a particular focus on the manifestations of behavioural plasticity in the archaeological record of Homo sapiens in eastern Africa.

Rob Hosfield is Associate Professor in Palaeolithic Archaeology at the University of Reading. He has undertaken Palaeolithic fieldwork in the UK and Africa (Sudan), and his research has focused on Lower and early Middle Palaeolithic hominin settlement histories, survival strategies and material culture.
Armenian Archaeology: Past Experiences and New Achievements edited by Aram Kosyan, Pavel Avetisyan, Arsen Bobokhyan and Yervand Grekyan. Paperback; 165x235mm; 494 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (160 colour pages). 10 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693935. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693942. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This special edition of Aramazd: Armenian Journal of Near Eastern Studies is dedicated to the 25th anniversary of the Republic of Armenia and summarises the studies conducted in Armenia in the field of archaeology (1991-2016).

Contributions included in this volume cover a significant time span, from Lower Palaeolithic to the Middle Ages. The articles summarise the archaeological surveys conducted by joint international expeditions and partly by Armenian archaeologists.

The volume also introduces the bio-bibliography of several outstanding representatives of Armenian archaeologists of the past whose activities enhanced the establishment and development of the Armenian archaeological school.
Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 4 2019 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). Paperback; vi+532 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 4 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693775. £60.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693782. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The fourth volume of the Journal of Greek Archaeology (JGA) is unusually rich and varied in content. Geographically the articles range from Sicily via Greece to Anatolia and the Near East, while chronologically they extend from the Bronze Age to the Ottoman era. Thematically there is a set of papers in landscape studies which include agricultural history, settlement geography, regional comparisons; articles on material culture which encompass metallurgy, ceramics, the links between language and artefacts, and production and trade; papers on aspects of human social science such as palaeopathology and deformity, gender studies and the representation of the supernatural; historical perspectives are finally represented by articles on fortifications and Islamisation. Of particular note is a lengthy presentation of the survey and excavation at the recently discovered Mycenaean palace in the Sparta Valley.

The review section is even broader, running from the Palaeolithic through to aspects of present-day heritage studies, and covering an equally wide field of topics.

Architectures of Fire: Processes, Space and Agency in Pyrotechnologies edited by Dragoş Gheorghiu. 98 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693676. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693683. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Architectures of Fire attempts to present the entanglement between the physical phenomenon of fire, the pyro-technological instrument that it is, its material supports, and the human being. In this perspective, the physical process of combustion, material culture, as well as the development of human action in space, are addressed together.

Fire is located at the centre of all pre-modern architecture. It creates the living or technological space. Fire creates architectures since it imposes geometry, from the simple circles of stone or clay, which control its spread (and which are the geometrical figures of its optimal efficiency), to cone trunks, cylinders, half-spheres, half-cylinders or parallelepipeds, circular geometric figures that efficiently control the air-draught process required for combustion. All these forms involving the circle are determined by the control and conservation of thermal energy.

We should not imagine that the term ‘architecture’ evokes only constructed objects that delimit human action. Architecture means not only the built space, but also the experienced space, in the present case around the pyro-instruments. Pyro-instruments involve an ergonomic, kinesthetic and visual relationship, as well as the rhythmic actions of feeding or maintaining fire at a certain technological tempo. The technological agency is structured both by the physics of the combustion phenomenon, and by the type of operation to be performed.

About the Author
Dragoş Gheorghiu is an historical anthropologist/archaeologist and experimentalist whose studies focus on the process of cognition, material culture and ancient technologies.

He has edited books on fire in archaeology, fire as material culture, fire as an instrument, also on ceramics, figurines and stamps. He has contributed articles on ceramic technology, kilns and burned houses in the Chalcolithic, and during the last two decades has carried out experiments with the building and burning of wattle and daub houses, with kilns and with other structures involved with combustion.

Professor Gheorghiu is the Secretary of the UISPP Commission ‘Neolithic Civilizations of the Mediterranean and Europe’, and is a member of the European Association of Archaeologists. He is a Paul Mellon Fellow at the Centre of Advanced Studies in the Visual Arts, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
Carving Interactions: Rock Art in the Nomadic Landscape of the Black Desert, North-Eastern Jordan by Nathalie Østerled Brusgaard. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+206 pages; 216 figures, 32 tables (129 colour pages). 577 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693119. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693126. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Safaitic rock art of the North Arabian basalt desert is a unique and understudied material, one of the few surviving traces of the elusive herding societies that inhabited this region in antiquity. Yet little is known about this rock art and its role in the desert societies. Why did these peoples make carvings in the desert and what was the significance of this cultural practice? What can the rock art tell us about the relationship between the nomads and their desert landscape? This book investigates these questions through a comprehensive study of over 4500 petroglyphs from the Jebel Qurma region of the Black Desert in north-eastern Jordan. It explores the content of the rock art, how it was produced and consumed by its makers and audience, and its relationship with the landscape. This is the first-ever systematic study of the Safaitic petroglyphs from the Black Desert and it is unique for the study of Arabian rock art. It demonstrates the value of a material approach to rock art and the unique insights that rock art can provide into the relationship between nomadic herders and the wild and domestic landscape.

About the Author
Nathalie Østerled Brusgaard (PhD, Leiden University) is an archaeologist specialising in rock art studies and social zooarchaeology. Nathalie has worked on excavations in the Netherlands and Germany and on rock art surveys in Jordan and the USA.
Messages from the Past: Rock Art of Al-Hajar Mountains by Angelo E. Fossati. Paperback; 210x297mm; xxx+304 pages; 398 figures; 10 maps; 1 table (215 colour pages). (Print RRP £58.00). 557 2019 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 4. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692860. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692877. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £58.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Turtles, ibexes, ships, inscriptions... Thousands of engraved and painted figures intrigue visitors in the wadis of Al-Hajar Mountains. Who created these enigmatic figures and when were they made? What are their hidden meanings? For the first time, this volume tries to answer these questions. It is the result of the archaeological surveys and investigations undertaken by the author over the last ten years under the patronage of the Ministry of Heritage and Culture. In this book, the author takes the reader on an in-depth journey into the various themes present in the rock art of Oman. He offers theories on the chronology and interpretation, while exploring the landscape setting of the decorated panels and how best to research these. Several beautiful photographs and scientific tracings of the rock art accompany the text. The volume closes offering to enthusiasts and tourists a series of guided visits with GPS maps to the most interesting and visible rock art sites protected by Royal Decrees of the Sultanate.

About the author
Angelo E. Fossati is an Italian archaeologist specialized in rock art studies. He teaches Prehistory and Protohistory at the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart in Milan (Italy) and researches mainly on Alpine megalithism and pre-Roman inscriptions. Dr Fossati has conducted rock art documentation and studies in several countries including Italy, France, Portugal and the USA. He has been consultant for the UNESCO Word Heritage Center and is President of «Footsteps of Man» an Italian rock art society member of the International Federation of Rock Art Organizations. The author has published several papers and books on various rock art traditions. In Oman, he has conducted numerous surveys and documentation works under the patronage of the Ministry of Heritage and Culture in several areas of Al-Hajar Mountains.
A Painted Ridge: Rock art and performance in the Maclear District, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa by David Mendel Witelson. Paperback; 203x276mm; x+148 pages; 39 figures (31 colour pages). 91 2019 Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 98. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692440. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692457. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

A Painted Ridge is a book about the San (Bushmen) practice of rock painting. In it, David Witelson explores a suite of spatially close San rock painting sites in the Maclear District of South Africa’s Eastern Cape Province. As a suite, the sites are remarkable because, despite their proximity to each other, they share patterns of similarity and simultaneous difference. They are a microcosm that reflects, in a broad sense, a trend found at other painted sites in South Africa. Rather than attempting to explain these patterns chiefly in terms of chronological breaks or cultural discontinuities, this book seeks to understand patterns of similarity and difference primarily in terms of the performative nature of San image-making. In doing so, the bygone and almost unrecorded practice of San rock art is considered relative to ethnographically well-documented and observed forms of San expressive culture. The approach in the book draws on concepts and terminology from the discipline of performance studies to characterise the San practice of image-making as well as to coordinate otherwise disparate ideas about that practice. It is a study that aims to explicate the nuances of what David Lewis-Williams called the ‘production and consumption’ of San rock art.

About the Author
David Mendel Witelson is a doctoral candidate with Professor David Pearce at the University of the Witwatersrand’s Rock Art Research Institute. His doctoral research is on hunter-gatherer rock art in the north Eastern Cape Province of South Africa with a focus on the role that image-making plays in establishing spatial connections and social relations. In addition to rock art, his research interests include the Holocene archaeology of southern Africa, archaeological method and theory, and the intersection of mainstream archaeological and rock art research. He has published previously in the fields of rock art and lithic analysis. David lives in Linden, Johannesburg.
Tentsmuir: Ten Thousand Years of Environmental History by Robert M. M. Crawford. Paperback; 254x203mm; vi+190 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. 519 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691245. £24.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691252. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Tentsmuir has been a scene of human activity for over 10,000 years. It witnessed one of the earliest known occurrences in Scotland of Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and has supported human activities throughout the Neolithic and Iron Age. In medieval times it was a home for the Norman nobility, and then a royal hunting forest with highly-valued fishing rights for Scottish Kings.

Tentsmuir is prone to flooding in winter due to the front line of dunes blocking drainage to the sea. It provides a natural refuge for a wide range of plants, as well as resident and migrating birds, and other animals, including outstanding populations of butterflies and moths. Consequently, this led to the creation in 1954 of a National Nature Reserve at the north-eastern end of the Tentsmuir Peninsula. Initially, an active period of coastal accretion more than trebled the size of the reserve. Now, however, Tentsmuir is eroding in places. The probability of rising sea levels and increasing exposure to storms may cause a level of destruction such that the physical existence and biological future of Tentsmuir cannot be guaranteed.

This book is an attempt to record how even within a limited geographical area, such as this peninsula on the east coast of Scotland, plant and animal communities are constantly reacting to environmental change. Frequently, it is difficult to decide whether or not these changes should be resisted, encouraged, or ignored. Examples are provided of instances where human intervention to counteract change has resulted in negative as well as positive consequences for biodiversity.

About the Author
ROBERT M. M. CRAWFORD is a graduate of the Universities of Glasgow and Liège. Postdoctoral years were spent at the Bakh Institute of Biochemistry in Moscow and at the biochemistry and botany departments of the Universities of Freiburg, Munich, and Oxford. From 1962 – 1999 he taught and researched at the University of St Andrews, pursuing in particular the study of the physiological ecology of plants in a wide range of habitats in Scotland, Scandinavia, North and South America, and the Arctic. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the Linnean Society of London, and an associate member of the Belgian Royal Academy of Sciences.
Dhofar Through the Ages An Ecological, Archaeological and Historical Landscape by Lynne S. Newton and Juris Zarins. Paperback; 210x297mm; xvi+132 pages; 61 figures, 47 tables (colour throughout). 521 2019 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691603. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691610. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Dhofar, the southern governorate of Oman, lies within a distinctive ecological zone due to the summer Southwest Monsoon. It is home to numerous indigenous succulent plants, the most famous of which is frankincense (Boswellia sacra). The region, tied in the past to both Oman and Yemen, has a long and distinguished archaeological past stretching back to the Lower Paleolithic ca. 1.5 my BP. Dhofar is also home to a distinctive people, the Modern South Arabian Languages speakers (MSAL) since at least the last 15,000 years. Ancient Zafar (Al-Habudi), now called Al-Baleed, and its successor Salalah was and is the province’s largest city. From the seventh century onwards until the arrival of the Portuguese in 1504 AD Al-Baleed dominated the central southern Arabian coastline politically and economically. Archaeological surveys and excavations in the governorate, beginning in 1954, have brought to light Dhofar’s ancient past.

About the Authors
LYNNE S. NEWTON received her doctorate from the University of Minnesota with research on the Iron Age and Islamic periods in the Mahra Governorate of Yemen. Since 2007, she has co-directed excavations at the Medieval port of Al-Baleed and the general archaeological survey of Dhofar. Between 2011 and 2014, she was Curator of Maritime History at the National Museum of Qatar. The author published numerous research articles on Dhofar and the Mahra Governate, including also her doctorate A Landscape of Pilgrimage and Trade in Wadi Masila Yemen (2009) and is co-author of the Atlas of Archaeological Survey in Governorate of Dhofar, Sultanate of Oman (2013).

JURIS ZARINS is retired Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology at Missouri State University. He has excavated sites from the Lower Paleolithic to the Ottoman period in Mesopotamia (Turkey and Iraq) and more recently in the Arabian Peninsula, with a specific focus on the development of pastoral nomadism in Arabia and the origins of the Bedouin. Between 1992 and 2011, he worked in the Sultanate of Oman to uncover the Medieval port of al-Baleed and to conduct a general archaeological survey of Dhofar. The author has published many scientific research articles, including Dhofar: The Land of Incense (2001) and The Domestication of Equids in Ancient Mesopotamia (2014).
Aesthetics, Applications, Artistry and Anarchy: Essays in Prehistoric and Contemporary Art A Festschrift in honour of John Kay Clegg, 11 January 1935 – 11 March 2015 edited by Jillian Huntley and George Nash. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+170 pages; 100 figures, 5 tables (42 plates in colour). 496 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919986. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919993. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Scholar and artist John Clegg made a pioneering contribution to the study of rock art. He was the first in the Australian academy to teach rock art research as a dedicated subject (Sydney University 1965-2000), supervising the first graduate students with such specialty, subsequently supporting their careers. He is honoured here for much more than his novelty and the contributions in this monograph pay homage to the late John Kay Clegg’s diverse influence. Rock art researchers from around the globe traverses topics such as aesthetics, the application of statistical analyses, frontier conflict and layered symbolic meanings, the deliberate use of optical illusion, and the contemporary significance of ancient and street art. They cover rock art assemblages from Columbia, South Africa, Europe and across Clegg’s beloved Australia. They interrogate descriptive and analytic concepts such as repainting, memorialisation and graffiti, as well as questioning the ethical impactions of research practices touching rock art as a part of its study.

The tributes in this book are necessarily as individual as the man they honour, and John Clegg was certainly an individual. The longevity of ideas and perspectives Clegg brought to the pursuit of rock art research is demonstrated in this collection of works. Clegg’s continued relevance is testament to the value and magnitude of his contribution. He is a deserving subject for a Festschrift.

About the Editors
Dr JILLIAN HUNTLEY is a Research Fellow at the Place Evolution Rock Art Heritage Unit in the Centre for Social and Cultural Research at Griffith University, Australia. She specialises in the physiochemical characterization of rock art and other archaeological pigments and has been privileged in recent years to work on high-profile Australasian finds. A field archaeologist by trade, Jillian has 15 years experience in public archaeology and has worked with Aboriginal peoples across Australia since 2001 recording rock art as part of both research and commercial projects. Best known as an archaeological scientist, Jillian has published on diverse topics relating to rock art from the complex impacts of mining to pseudoarchaeology.

Dr GEORGE NASH is an Associate Professor at the Museum of Prehistoric Art, Quaternary and Prehistory Geosciences Centre, Maçao, Portugal. George has been a professional archaeologist for the past 25 years and has undertaken extensive fieldwork on prehistoric rock-art and mobility art in Chile, Denmark, Indonesia, Malaysia, Norway, Sardinia, Spain and Sweden. Between 1994 and 1997 he directed excavations at the La Hougue Bie passage grave on Jersey, one of Europe’s largest Neolithic monuments and has also directed preliminary excavations at Westminster Hall, London. He has also written, edited and co-edited many books on prehistoric art and monumentality including the most recent book entitled Archaeologies of Rock Art: South American Perspectives (2018). In the past George has been involved in a number of major rock-art recording and interpretation projects, the most recent being in the Central Negev region of southern Israel and in central Andean Chile. In his native Wales, he is convener for the Welsh Rock art Organisation (WRAO). In addition to fieldwork, he has also written and presented programmes on European rock-art and contemporary graffiti for the BBC.
Thurrock’s Deeper Past: A Confluence of Time The archaeology of the borough of Thurrock, Essex, from the last Ice Age to the establishment of the English kingdoms by Christopher John Tripp. Paperback; 148x210mm; vi+200 pages; 65 figures, 6 maps (36 plates in colour). 504 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691115. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691122. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Thurrock’s Deeper Past: A Confluence of Time looks at the evidence for human activity in Thurrock and this part of the Thames estuary since the last Ice Age, and how the river crossing point here has been of great importance to the development of human settlement and trade in the British Isles. It is a book about the archaeology of Thurrock. It takes in all periods and most of the sites which have been excavated in the borough of Thurrock over the last sixty or more years.

The account opens at a time when Britain is still joined to the continent and the inhabitants are using flint tools and weapons. The author follows through the impact of the succeeding ages on the locality: the melting of the ice, the Neolithic period bringing the farming of crops and stockholding, the first appearance of worked metal in the Bronze Age, through the widespread use of iron in the Iron Age; and then the dramatic impact of Rome and its gradual dissolution to the English kingdoms whose traces are still recognisable today. All is set in the context of the author’s lasting interest in the subject, first nurtured at his Tilbury school.

About the Author
Thurrock was home to Chris Tripp for much of his early life. He attended St Chad’s Secondary Modern School in Tilbury and then Palmer’s Sixth Form College. After years spent in retail he became an archaeologist, graduating from the Institute of Archaeology (UCL) in 1986. He took up his first archaeological post in 1990 at the Passmore Edwards Museum, Plaistow, after which he worked for the Museum of London Archaeology Service and the Essex County Field Unit between 1995 and 2002. During this time he gained his masters degree in public archaeology at UCL.

For the next four years Chris worked on various excavations and community archaeology projects including ‘The Dig’ for the Museum of London, and ‘The Big Dig’ for Time Team/Channel 4 among many others. Moving to Dorset in 2006, he continued in archaeology and, inter alia established the ‘Dorset Diggers Community Archaeology Group’ to bring people closer to their local archaeological heritage.

It is in this spirit that he began research for this book in 1997, and his labours have been sustained by his passion for the past of his home borough of Thurrock and of the majestic Thames.
Art of the Ancestors: Spatial and temporal patterning in the ceiling rock art of Nawarla Gabarnmang, Arnhem Land, Australia by Robert G. Gunn. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+902 pages; illustrated in full colour throughout. 492 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690705. £150.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690712. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume presents a new systematic approach to the archaeological recording and documentation of rock art developed to analyse the spatial and temporal structure of complex rock art panels. Focusing on the ceiling art at Nawarla Gabarnmang, one of the richest rock art sites in Arnhem Land the approach utilised DStretch-enhanced photographs to record 1391 motifs from 42 separate art panels across the ceiling. Harris Matrices were then built to show the sequence of superimpositions for each art panel. Using common attributes, including features identified by Morellian Method (a Fine Art method not previously employed in archaeological rock art studies), contemporaneous motifs within panels were then aggregated into individual layers. The art layers of the various panels were then inter-related using the relative and absolute chronological evidence to produce a full relative sequence for the site as a whole. This provided a story of the art that began some 13,000 years ago and concluded around 60 years ago, with a major change identified in the art some 450 years ago. The method was shown to be invaluable to the resolution of many difficult issues associated with the identification of motifs, their superimpositions and the development of art sequences.

About the Author
Dr Robert Gunn is a consultant archaeologist with over 35 years’ experience and who specialises in the recording and management of Australian Aboriginal rock art. He has published over 50 papers and monographs, mostly on areas of rock art research. He has worked throughout Australia with research interests in Arnhem Land, Central Australia, Western Victoria, south-western regions of Western Australia, and Far Western NSW. This work has involved the collection of both archaeological and ethnographic information and, consequently, he has worked closely with senior Aboriginal custodians and traditional owners. Robert completed his PhD at Monash University, Australia, in 2007. He is currently a Research Fellow affiliated with Monash Indigenous Study Centre, Monash University, and the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage.
Human Mobility in Archaeology: Practices, Representations and Meanings Ex Novo: Journal of Archaeology, Volume 3, 2018 edited by Maja Gori, Martina Revello Lami and Alessandro Pintucci. 3 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691214. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

It has been abundantly demonstrated that theories and paradigms in the humanities are influenced by historical, economic and socio-cultural conditions, which have profoundly influenced archaeology’s representation of migration. This was mostly conceived as the study of the movement of large and homogenous population groups, whose identity was often represented as ethnically characterized. The present-day shift of attention from collective to individual agency and the countless facets of migration goes hand in hand with new socio-political and cultural scenarios such as the extraordinary migratory flows into Europe, shifting boundaries, alternative forms of citizenship and identity, and the emergence of emotive reactionism.

The third issue of Ex Novo gathers multidisciplinary contributions addressing mobility to understand patterns of change and continuity in past worlds; reconsider the movement of people, objects, and ideas alongside mobile epistemologies, such as intellectual, scholarly or educative traditions, rituals, practices, religions and theologies; and provide insights into the multifaceted relationship between mobile practices and their shared meanings and how they are represented socially and politically.

Table of Contents
Maja GORI, Martina REVELLO LAMI & Alessandro PINTUCCI
Editorial: Practices, Representations and Meanings of Human Mobility in Archaeology

Paraskevi ELEFANTI & Gilbert MARSHALL
Mobility during the Upper Palaeolithic Greece: Some Suggestions for the Argolid Peninsula

Maurizio CRUDO
Greek Migrations along the Ionian Coast (Southern Italy)

Anna RAUDINO
Variation in Material Culture: Adoption of Greek Ceramics in an Indigenous Sicilian Site (8th century BC)

Maria ÁLVAREZ-FOLGADO
The Jewish Diaspora in the Roman Empire. Diaspora, Social Agents and Social Networks: Towards the Creation of a New Analytical Toolkit

Domiziana ROSSI
A Road to Fīrūzābād

Marijn STOLK
Exploring Immigrant Identities: The Link between Portuguese Ceramics and Sephardic Immigrants in 17th Century Amsterdam

Jesùs GARCÍA SANCHEZ
From War Material Culture to Popular Heritage, and Beyond. The PSP “Cancelli di Venosa” as paradigms of Object Biography Theory.

Reviews
A. Falcone & A. D’Eredità (eds.) ARCHEOSOCIAL L’Archeologia Riscrive il Web: Esperienze, Strategie e Buone Pratiche, Rende (CS): Dielle Editore, 2018, 195 pp. Reviewed by Paola DI GIUSEPPANTONIO DI FRANCO
Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 3 2018 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). Paperback; vi+526 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (107 colour plates). 3 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690316. £60.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690323. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now


Narratives and Journeys in Rock Art: A Reader edited by George Nash and Aron Mazel. Paperback; 175x245mm; xiv+686 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (81 plates in colour). 484 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915605. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915612. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £75.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Why publish a Reader? Today, it is relatively easy and convenient to switch on your computer and download an academic paper. However, as many scholars have experienced, historic references are difficult to access. Moreover, some are now lost and are merely references in later papers. This can be frustrating. This book provides a series of papers from all over the world that extend as far back as the 1970s when rock art research was in its infancy. The papers presented in the Reader reflect the development in the various approaches that have influenced advancing scholarly research.

About the Editors
GEORGE NASH is an Associate Professor at Geosciences Centre of Coimbra University (u. ID73-FCT), Polytechnic Institute of Tomar (IPT), Portugal. Dr Nash is a specialist in openair rock art and contemporary street art and has recently undertaken fieldwork and research in Andean Chile, the Negev Desert in southern Israel, central Portugal and Wales.

ARON MAZEL is a Reader in Heritage Studies at Newcastle University, United Kingdom. Dr Mazel has done extensive recording of rock art in the uKhahlamba-Drakensberg (South Africa) and Northumberland (United Kingdom).
Roots of Nationhood: The Archaeology and History of Scotland edited by Louisa Campbell, Dene Wright, Nicola A. Hall. Paperback; 175x245mm; ii+210 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 7 plates in colour. 478 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919825. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919832. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In a break away from the traditional mono-disciplinary scope of academic enquiry, this volume sets forth a challenge for practitioners within, and outwith archaeology to develop multi-disciplinary approaches in the study of identity in general and aspects in the formation of national identity in particular. The entanglement of identity and nationhood is explored from the prehistory of northern Britain; the establishment of a proto-Scottish identity in the early Middle Ages; facets of Scottish identity at home and in the wider diaspora of Empire; and the more recent heralding of Scottish identity as a multiethnic construction. Set against the backdrop of a groundswell change in the Scottish political landscape and the unprecedented, and largely unexpected, energised and proactive politicisation of the Scottish electorate in the lead up to and aftermath of the 2014 Independence Referendum, the volume is a timely and relevant contribution to discussions of national identities. By bringing together specialists covering a wide array of time periods and subject specialisms, we transcend the concept of identity. This is achieved by exploring the links of nationhood and Scottish identity in the early 20th and 21st Centuries in the ongoing quest for independence demonstrating the political manipulation of history, imagery and mythology entangled in political propaganda.

About the Editors
LOUISA CAMPBELL MA PhD FSA Scot is a graduate of the University of Glasgow. She a Roman ceramic specialist and her main research interests are threefold: material culture, the Roman and Provincial interface with a particular focus on frontier contexts and theoretical approaches to the study of culture contact. She has recently undertaken a Postdoctoral Fellowship supported by Historic Environment Scotland to develop innovative methodologies and technologies for the non-destructive in situ analysis of museum collections. This project, entitled Paints and Pigments in the Past (PPIP), resulted in the identification and reconstruction of pigments originally applied to Roman monumental sculptures from the Antonine Wall and Hadrian’s Wall.

DENE WRIGHT MA MLitt PhD FSA Scot is a graduate of the University of Glasgow. Dene is a lithic specialist and his principal research interest is the Mesolithic. His research centres on the Mesolithic of Scotland with a particular focus on west central Scotland. The structure of his research develops and incorporates Deleuzian theoretical approaches to the concepts of repetition, difference and becoming, identity and group identities as philosophical constructs in Archaeology, the symmetry of lithic technology and technological choices, symmetrical approaches to the chaîne opératoire and lithic analysis and the construct of time as a relational multiplicity of dimensions in co-existence. A research associate at Glasgow funded by Historic Environment Scotland, with Kenneth Brophy he is currently writing up for publication the excavations for Phase II (2012-17) of the Strathearn Environs & Royal Forteviot ‘SERF’ Project.

NICOLA A. HALL MA MLitt is a Senior Heritage Management Officer at Historic Environment Scotland. She is an Archaeology graduate of the University of Glasgow with a particular interest on ritual practice in the Neolithic/Early Bronze Age of Western Scotland. Her research incorporates archaeological theory, landscape archaeology, gender, ritual practice and seasonality.
Aprovechamiento de vertebrados terrestres por las poblaciones humanas que habitaron la costa del Golfo San Matías (Río Negro, Argentina) durante el Holoceno tardío by Hernán A. Marani. Paperback; 175x245mm; 284 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (109 plates in colour). Spanish text with English abstract. 69 2018 South American Archaeology Series 31. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690118. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690125. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This book presents the results and discussion of archaeofaunal studies which took place in the northern San Matías Gulf (Rio Negro Province) during the last six years, focussing on terrestrial mammals and birds. The general objective of this research is to determine what was the mode of operation of terrestrial vertebrates (small and big), and the importance that they had in the survival of human populations that occupied the coastline during the late Holocene (last 3000 years).
Quebrando rocas, una aproximación metodológica para el estudio del cuarzo en contextos arqueológicos de Córdoba (Argentina) by Eduardo Pautassi. Paperback; 175x205mm; vi+214 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (73 plates in colour). Spanish text. 68 2018 South American Archaeology Series 30. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690095. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690101. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This book offers a valuable contribution to the development of a methodology to address the study of archaeological quartz artifacts, combining various analytical tools to study these objects so that we might better understand the technological strategies of hunting societies who made use of this raw material.

La meta de este libro es aportar al desarrollo de una metodología para abordar el estudio de artefactos arqueológicos de cuarzo, focalizándose en la combinación de diversas herramientas analíticas que permitan estudiar estos utensilios y contribuir así a una mejor comprensión de las estrategias tecnológicas de las sociedades cazadoras recolectoras que hicieron uso de esta materia prima. Ello implica, por un lado, evaluar el potencial de dicha roca para la producción de instrumentos líticos, considerando las distintas técnicas de talla, así como analizar las propiedades y cualidades de los filos para la realización de diversas actividades de incidencia sobre la materia en general, considerando a las de corte y raspado, en particular. Con el fin de someter a prueba esta propuesta, es que se abordarán como caso de estudio las estrategias tecnológicas implementadas por los grupos cazadores-recolectores que habitaron en el Valle de Calamuchita (provincia de Córdoba) durante el Holoceno medio y tardío, estudiando allí el rol cumplido por el cuarzo como materia prima, así como el uso y manufactura de artefactos de cuarzo en dicho contexto particular. Consta de tres partes principales: la primera de ellas aborda el enfoque metodológico y consta de cinco capítulos; la segunda parte comprende los resultados obtenidos luego de la aplicación de estos desarrollos metodológicos a través de programas experimentales tanto de manufactura como de uso de instrumentos sobre cuarzo ; por último, la tercer parte incluye la aplicación de los resultados obtenidos en el análisis de un caso de estudio en sitios arqueológicos de Calamuchita.
Technologie du harponnage sur la côte Pacifique du désert d’Atacama (nord du Chili) by Benjamín Ballester Riesco. Paperback; 203x276mm; 78 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (25 plates in colour); French text, Abstracts in English and Spanish, Foreword in Spanish. 67 2018 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 52. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690279. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690286. Download Full PDF   Buy Now

These objects do not have a single purpose. This is the central premise that guides the research within this book. Throughout the volume the reader will follow a representation of a marine hunter-gatherer society, a projection deriving from one of its iconic and most important material assets, the harpoon. This very technical object will be studied not only for its most evident function - hunting at sea – and the work delves into the structural, symbolic, technological and world-building aspects of the human societies that used them. To achieve this goal the text begins with a judgment about the role of marine hunting, its prey, and the agents involved in different coastal societies on the American continent, in order to create a comprehensive framework of reference for the subject. It continues by focussing on clarifying, defining and discussing the concept of harponage from technology compared with other historical and ethnographic cases of marine hunters across the globe. A typology of harpoon points from the Atacama Desert is presented, with classification based on their technical attributes, constituent units, composition features and articulation mechanisms, in order to evaluate the chronological scope and geographical distribution of each one of the types of harpoon heads from the last 7000 years of coastal history. The text then explores the multiple values and meanings of the harpoons of the Atacama Desert. The book finally examines the social reasons that influenced the development of an incredibly sophisticated and complex technology of marine hunting. Inferences that take it out of the sea and away from hunting, towards hypotheses that seek answers in the cultural determinism stemming from technical decisions, to utilise technology as another mechanism to establish and strengthen social bonds in the construction of worlds between different agents and collectives, and no longer as a simple tool to satisfy subsistence needs.

Les objets n’ont pas un seul objectif. Prémisse centrale qui guide le dénouement de ce livre. Dans les pages suivantes le lecteur trouvera une réflexion sur une société des chasseurs-collecteurs marins à partir d’un de ces biens matériaux iconiques et un des plus importantes, le harpon. Cet objet technique sera étudié hors de sa fonction la plus évidente, au-delà de la chasse marine, pour pénétrer les aspects structurels, symboliques, technologiques et de construction du monde de ces collectifs humains. Pour entreprendre ce défi, le texte nous submerge dans un premier temps dans une révision critique sur le rôle de la chasse marine, leurs proies et les agents impliqués dans ces activités et dans différentes sociétés côtières du continent américain, afin de pourvoir un cadre de référence adéquate sur cette thématique. Dans un deuxième moment, nous nous centrons dans l’éclaircissement, la définition et la concrétisation du concept de harponnage depuis la technologie comparée avec d’autres cas historiques et ethnographiques de chasseurs-cueilleurs du monde. Une typologie de têtes de harpon pour le désert d’Atacama est ensuite présentée, fondée sur leurs solutions techniques, leurs unités constitutives, leurs normes de composition et leurs mécanismes d’articulation, pour évaluer ensuite la portée chronologique et la distribution géographique de chaque type au cours des dernières 7000 années d’histoire littorale. Par la suite, le texte tente d’explorer les multiples valeurs et significations des harpons du désert d’Atacama. Dans sa partie finale, notre récit aborde les raisons sociales qui ont permis le développement d’une technologie de chasse marine aussi sophistiquée et complexe. Interprétations qui nous emmènent hors de la mer et loin de la chasse, vers des hypothèses qui cherchent des réponses sur les contraintes culturelles qui se trouvent derrière les décisions techniques, pour concevoir à la technologie comme un mécanisme employé afin d’établir les liens sociaux dans la construction
Une archéologie des provinces septentrionales du royaume Kongo edited by Bernard Clist, Pierre de Maret and Koen Bostoen. Paperback; 205x290mm; 500pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (approx. 205 plates in colour). French text throughout. 465 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919726. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919733. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Of all the great kingdoms that flourished in Africa, the Kongo is one of the most famous. It remains an important historical and cultural reference for Africans and their diaspora. The KongoKing inter-university project (2012-2016), funded by the European Research Council, aimed, through an interdisciplinary approach, to understand the origin of the kingdom and to shed light on the phenomena of political centralization, economic integration and linguistic evolution that took place there. This book presents in detail the results of archaeological research carried out by the KongoKing project in the former northern provinces of the Kongo Kingdom, currently located in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

French Description: De tous les grands royaumes qui fleurirent en Afrique, le royaume Kongo est l’un des plus célèbres. Il reste une référence historique et culturelle importante pour les Africains et leur diaspora. Entraînés très tôt dans le commerce de traite, les esclaves originaires de la région font que du Brésil à New York, en passant par les Caraïbes, la culture Kongo a laissé de nombreuses traces.

Le projet interuniversitaire KongoKing (2012-2016), financé par le Conseil Européen de la Recherche a été coordonné par Koen Bostoen, tandis que Bernard Clist et Pierre de Maret en ont dirigé le volet archéologique. Ce projet visait par une approche interdisciplinaire à comprendre l’origine du royaume et à éclairer les phénomènes de la centralisation politique, d’intégration économique et d’évolution linguistique qui s’y sont déroulés .

Cet ouvrage présente de façon détaillée les résultats des recherches archéologiques menées par le projet KongoKing dans les anciennes provinces septentrionales du royaume Kongo, situées actuellement en République Démocratique du Congo. Dans une première partie on présente le contexte général, l’évolution du milieu, l’histoire du groupe linguistique kikongo et ce que l'on sait des périodes qui précèdent le royaume, ainsi que des informations récoltées dans diverses sources historiques sur ces provinces. Les prospections et fouilles des différents sites étudiés sont ensuite présentées. Puis vient le bilan des recherches archéologiques avec une synthèse des datations, une esquisse de la séquence chrono-culturelle de la poterie kongo et les études systématiques des différents types de vestiges récoltés. Pour conclure, on présente la synthèse de l'ensemble de ces découvertes et la façon dont celles-ci viennent compléter les données issues des autres disciplines pour éclairer d'un jour nouveau l'histoire du royaume Kongo.

BERNARD CLIST est actuellement professeur invité de l’Université de Gand (UGent). Il est archéologue depuis 38 ans, spécialiste de l’Afrique centrale où il a dirigé des projets de recherches notamment en Angola, Cameroun, Gabon et Guinée-Equatoriale. Entre 1985 et 1995 il a été le responsable du Département d’Archéologie du CICIBA au Gabon qu’il a créé. Il a aussi réalisé de nombreuses Etudes d’Impact Environnemental pour des sociétés américaines, britanniques, françaises au Gabon et en Zambie. Pendant toutes ces années, il a publié ou co-publié plus de 130 articles et 8 ouvrages. Entre 2015 et 2016, il a contribué à la version finale du dossier de classement par l’UNESCO du centre historique de Mbanza Kongo au Patrimoine Mondial de l’Humanité, chose acquise en juillet 2017.

PIERRE DE MARET est professeur d’anthropologie et d’archéologie à l’Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) dont il a été le recteur, et Honorary professor à l’University College de Londres. Il poursuit depuis plus de 45 ans des recherches sur le terrain en Afrique centrale et est l’auteur de nombreuses publications sur l’histoire précoloniale, l’anthropologie économique et appliquée, et la gestion culturelle. Membre de l’Académie Royale de Belgique, il est aussi président du conseil scientifique du Musée Royal de l’Afrique Centrale (MRAC)
Softstone: Approaches to the study of chlorite and calcite vessels in the Middle East and Central Asia from prehistory to the present edited by Carl S. Phillips and St John Simpson. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+270 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 461 2018 British Foundation for the Study of Arabia Monographs (formerly Society for Arabian Studies Monographs) 20. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919924. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919931. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Stone containers have been made and used in the Middle East for over eleven millennia where they pre-dated the invention of pottery and were widely traded. The appearance or properties of the stone helped govern how stone vessels were valued or used and many classes were strictly utilitarian, being used for storage, cooking or lighting. Others were decorated and at times they were considered valuable exotica, particularly in regions far removed from their source areas. The subject of stone vessels is attracting growing attention but this is the first attempt to bring together different approaches to the study of softstone vessels, particularly but not exclusively those carved from varieties of chlorite, and covering all periods from prehistory to the present.

About the Editors
CARL S. PHILLIPS works in the Université Paris Ouest, specialises in Arabian archaeology and has excavated extensively in Oman, Yemen and the United Arab Emirates.

ST JOHN SIMPSON is a senior curator in the Department of the Middle East at the British Museum, specialises in the archaeology of the Sasanian and early medieval periods and has excavated extensively in the Middle East and Central Asia.
Papers in Italian Archaeology VII: The Archaeology of Death Proceedings of the Seventh Conference of Italian Archaeology held at the National University of Ireland, Galway, April 16-18, 2016 edited by Edward Herring & Eòin O’Donoghue. Paperback; 205x290mm; 504pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 435 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919214. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919221. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £80.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Archaeology of Death: Proceedings of the Seventh Conference of Italian Archaeology held at the National University of Ireland, Galway, April 16-18, 2016 includes more than 60 papers, with contributors from the British Isles, Italy and other parts of continental Europe, and North and South America, which consider recent developments in Italian archaeology from the Neolithic to the modern period. Each region of Italy is represented, with specific sections of the volume devoted to Etruria, South Italy, and Sicily. Other sections have a chronological focus, including Italian Prehistory, the Roman period, and Post Antiquity. Following the primary theme of the meeting, the majority of papers revolve around the archaeology of death; numerous contributions analyse the cultural significance of death through examinations of funerary rituals and mortuary practices, while others analyse burial data for evidence of wider social and political change. Various papers consider new and recent discoveries in Italian archaeology, while others ask fresh questions of older datasets. In addition, a number of contributions showcase their employment of new methodologies deriving from technological innovations. The volume opens with a dedicatory section to mark the achievements of the Accordia Research Institute, and to celebrate the careers of two of its founders, Ruth Whitehouse and John Wilkins.

About the Editors
EDWARD HERRING is Senior Lecturer in Classics at National University of Ireland, Galway. His principal research area is the archaeology of South Italy in the first millennium BC. A Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries since 2006, he held the A.D. Trendall Fellowship at the Institute of Classical Studies in London in 2011. His publications include Explaining Change in the Matt-Painted Pottery of Southern Italy (Oxford, 1998), (with R.D. Whitehouse and J.B. Wilkins) Botromagno. Excavation and Survey at Gravina in Puglia, 1979-1985 (London, 2000), and Patterns in the Production of Apulian Red-Figure Pottery (Newcastle, 2018).

Eóin O’Donoghue is based in the Department of Classics at Brock University, Canada. He specialises in Etruscan and Roman archaeology and excavates at Murlo with the Poggio Civitate Excavation Project and on the island of Pantelleria with the Brock University Archaeological Project at Pantelleria.
Giving the Past a Future: Essays in Archaeology and Rock Art Studies in Honour of Dr. Phil. h.c. Gerhard Milstreu edited by James Dodd and Ellen Meijer. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+300 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (96 plates in colour). 61 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919702. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919719. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume celebrates the work of Dr. Phil. h.c. Gerhard Milstreu in his 40th year as director of Tanum Museum of Rock Carving and Rock Art Research Centre, Underslös, Sweden. Here, a feast of scholarly contributions from across Europe, at all levels of study have been collected. Each and every one of the chapters addresses aspects connected to the work Gerhard has done over the last 40 years. Through their words and images, these pay respect to and acknowledge Gerhard’s achievements in the fields of rock art documentation, research, international collaboration and outreach. Gerhard has striven from the outset to: promote the importance of the image within archaeology, increase public interest and involvement with prehistoric art, and to encourage the next generation to continue the work. Thus, many authors think very deeply about the images, how we interpret them and how we record them, particularly in light of recent advances in technology. Others explore how Gerhard has fostered dissemination and public involvement. The range of countries and subjects represented; France, Italy, Holland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark and the UK; reflects the success of Gerhard’s focus on international collaboration and dialogue. Given Gerhard’s emphasis on giving the past a future, it is appropriate that leading up and coming scholars, from all levels of higher education, are also present and have the opportunity to present their latest research.

About the Editors
JAMES DODD is currently a PhD scholar at the Department of Archaeology and Heritage Studies, Aarhus University, Denmark. Originally educated at Durham University, James is a specialist in the study, analysis and documentation of the prehistoric rock art of Scandinavia. During the past few years, he has worked extensively in the field, becoming versed in the archaeology of the areas with various museums and institutions in the Scandinavian countries, in particular Bornholms Museum, Denmark. His current PhD project investigates the extent of homogeneity or diversity within Southern Tradition rock art. In addition to high-level statistical analyses and GIS, James is undertaking the largest programme of surface-based rock art documentation ever conducted in Denmark, on the island of Bornholm. Advances in technology are brought into the field with processing of image-based models occurring on site using remote access to cluster processing on the Danish e-Infrastructure Collaboration’s High Performance Computer: Abacus 2.0.

ELLEN MEIJER has been working with the documentation of rock carvings for the past 22 years. She has learned the ins and outs of documentation at Tanums Hällristningsmuseum Underslös. Since 2011, she has worked for projects on rock art documentation at the Swedish Rock Art Research Archives and the University of Gothenburg, as a research assistant, as well as a field supervisor teaching courses in rock art documentation organized by University of Gothenburg in collaboration with Swedish Rock Art Research Archives and The Scandinavian Society for Prehistoric Art. She has been jointly responsible for the development and implementation of digital documentation of rock art through Structure from Motion and optical laser scanning within the Tanum World Heritage Area and published in Adoranten, the peer reviewed Rock Art Magazine of The Scandinavian Society for Prehistoric Art.

Both James and Ellen are members of the Board of The Scandinavian Society for Prehistoric Art.
KYMISSALA: Archaeology – Education – Sustainability by Manolis I. Stefanakis. xii+192 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English and Greek.. 52 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917685. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917692. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The area of Kymissala on the southwest coast of Rhodes is of great archaeological interest, as it conceals a large number of important archaeological sites belonging to the lesser known ancient deme of the Rhodian countryside, the deme of Kymissaleis. The region is also of exceptional environmental and ecological importance, as it has a particular biodiversity and is protected by the European ‘Natura 2000’ network of nature protection areas.

Kymissala has systematically been researched during the past 10 years by the Kymissala Archaeological Research Project (KARP) inaugurated by the Department of Mediterranean Studies and the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Dodecanese in 2006.

The research, escaping from its narrow academic and archaeological context and exploiting the comparative advantage of the region, may –and should– inter alia, intervene in a mild and sustainable manner in the promotion of the archaeological site of Kymissala. Its ultimate goal is to promote the antiquities of the area, its educational value and its historical and cultural continuity within a protected natural environment, in the context of an ecological-archaeological park.

Under the title Kymissala: Archaeology – Education – Sustainability, fourteen original studies have been published, constituting the first complete presentation of the area of Kymissala and the work in progress, after ten years of systematic research, in terms of Archaeology, Education and Sustainable Development.

About the Author
Manolis I. Stefanakis is an Associate Professor in Classical Archaeology and Numismatics in the Department of Mediterranean Studies, University of the Aegean. Director of Postgraduate Studies in ‘Archaeology of the Eastern Mediterranean from the Prehistoric Era to the Late Antiquity: Greece, Egypt, Near East’.

Director of the University of the Aegean Archaeological Research in Kymissala, Rhodes (held in collaboration with the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Dodecanese) since 2006. Co-director (with Professor Nikolaos Stampolidis) of the University of the Aegean excavation (held in collaboration with the Ephorate of Antiquities of Rethymno) of the fortified citadel of Orne in Retymno, Crete, since 2016.

Co-founder and Publishing Director (with Dr. Nikos Litinas) of the annual scientific journal Eulimene: Studies in Classical Archaeology, Epigraphy, Numismatics and Papyrology, Rethymno: Mediterranean Archaeological Society (ISSN 1108-5800) and of Eulimene Series of Independent Publications, Rethymno: Mediterranean Archaeological Society. Co-founder and Publishing Director (with Assistant Professor Sotiris Ntalis) of the annual scientific journal Yearbook of Mediterranean Studies, Rhodes.

His research interests focus on Field Archaeology, Classical Archaeology, Ancient Greek Numismatics, Archaeology and Sustainability.