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NEW: Digging into the Dark Ages Early Medieval Public Archaeologies edited by Howard Williams and Pauline Magdalene Clarke. Paperback; 203x276mm; 368 pages; 162 illustrations (138 pages in colour). 108 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695274. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695281. Book contents pageDownload

What does the ‘Dark Ages’ mean in contemporary society? Tackling public engagements through archaeological fieldwork, heritage sites and museums, fictional portrayals and art, and increasingly via a broad range of digital media, this is the first-ever dedicated collection exploring the public archaeology of the Early Middle Ages (5th–11th centuries AD).

Digging into the Dark Ages builds on debates which took place at the 3rd University of Chester Archaeology Student Conference hosted by the Grosvenor Museum, Chester, 13 December 2017. It comprises original perspectives from students integrated with fresh research by heritage practitioners and academics. The book also includes four interviews offering perspectives on key dimensions of early medieval archaeology’s public intersections. By critically ‘digging into’ the ‘Dark Ages’, this book provides an introduction to key concepts and debates, a rich range of case studies, and a solid platform for future research.

About the Editors
Professor Howard Williams is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Chester and researches mortuary archaeology, archaeology and memory, the history of archaeology and public archaeology. He regularly writes an academic blog: Archaeodeath.

Pauline Magdalene Clarke graduated with a BA (Hons) degree in Archaeology with History in 2018, and an MA Past Landscapes and Environments in 2019, both from the University of Chester. Her MA dissertation focussed on the taphonomy of plant macrofossils.
NEW: The Role of Anglo-Saxon Great Hall Complexes in Kingdom Formation, in Comparison and in Context AD 500-750 by Adam McBride. Paperback; 205x290mm; xvi+350 pages; 228 figures (165 pages in colour). Print RRP (£55.00). 596 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693874. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693881. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Following the collapse of Roman Britain, early medieval England shows little evidence for complex hierarchy or supra-regional socio-political units for nearly two hundred years, until the turn of the 7th century, when the documented emergence of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms is seemingly confirmed by the sudden appearance of the first high-status settlements – the so-called great hall complexes. This book explores the role of great hall complexes in kingdom formation through an expansive and ambitious study, incorporating new fieldwork, new quantitative methodologies and new theoretical models for the emergence of high-status settlements and the formation and consolidation of supra-regional socio-political units. This study begins with a comparative analysis of all known great hall complexes, through which evidence is presented for a broad chronological development, paralleling and contributing to the development of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. The wider context of great hall complexes is then explored through a regional case study, charting the development of socio-economic power in the burials and settlements of the Upper Thames Valley, before situating the great hall complexes within this development. Ultimately, an overarching theoretical explanation is proposed for the emergence, development and abandonment of the great hall complexes, linking these sites with the development of a new elite ideology, the integration of new supra-regional communities and the consolidation of the newly formed Anglo-Saxon kingdoms.

About the Author
Adam McBride completed his DPhil in archaeology at the University of Oxford in 2019. During his doctoral studies, Adam collaborated with Helena Hamerow and Jane Harrison on the excavation of a high-status early medieval complex at Long Wittenham, Oxfordshire, UK. Adam previously worked in CRM/commercial archaeology in the Southeast United States, after completing an MPhil at the University of Cambridge.
NEW: Bridge of Civilizations: The Near East and Europe c. 1100–1300 edited by Peter Edbury, Denys Pringle and Balázs Major. Hardback; 176x250mm; xx+318 pages; 170 figures, 10 maps. (Print RRP £65.00). 576 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693270. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693287. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume brings together 22 of the papers presented at a conference held in Esztergom, Hungary, in May 2018 to coincide with the 800th anniversary of the crusade of King Andrew II of Hungary to the Holy Land in 1217–18. The theme, Bridge of Civilizations, was chosen to highlight aspects of the links and contrasts between Europe and the areas around the eastern Mediterranean that were visited and occupied by western crusaders and settlers in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, giving special attention to the evidence provided by archaeology and material culture, as well as historical sources.

The results of the joint Syrian-Hungarian Archaeological Mission (SHAM) to the Hospitaller castle of Margat (al-Marqab) highlighted in this volume include an up-to-date overview of the structural development of the site from 1187 to 1285, as well as particular studies of the wall paintings, cooking installations and pottery. SHAM’s recent rescue work at Crac des Chevaliers also provides the basis for studies of the water-management system and medieval burials revealed in its courtyard, while other papers examine the masonry marks and surviving evidence of medieval trebuchet damage at both castles. Other papers focus on the medieval castles of Karak (Jordan) and Jubayl (Lebanon), the medieval buildings of Latakia (Syria), the impact of the Crusades on buildings in Cairo, historic bridges in Lebanon, the medieval chapels of Yanouh-Mghayreh and Edde-Jbeil (Lebanon), piscinas in Crusader churches in the East, the images of donors found in medieval Lebanese churches, and the activity of late thirteenth-century Western metal-workers in Cyprus.

Papers focusing more particularly on historical sources include a new edition of a late eleventh- to twelfth-century pilgrimage itinerary from Hungary to the Holy Land, a discussion of two minor military orders in Hungary, and the portrayal of Sultan al-Kāmil in a contemporary western account of the Fifth Crusade.

About the Editors
Peter Edbury is Emeritus Professor of Medieval History in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. He has published widely on the history and institutions of the kingdoms founded by the crusaders in the Near East and has re-edited the legal treatises by John of Ibelin (2003) and Philip of Novara (2009).

Denys Pringle is Emeritus Professor in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. In addition to his four-volume corpus, The Churches of the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem (1993–2009), his recent publications include a volume of translated texts, Pilgrimage to Jerusalem and the Holy Land, 1187–1291 (2012), and a volume of collected studies, Churches, Castles and Landscape in the Frankish East (2013).

Balázs Major is an archaeologist, Arabist and historian by training and holds a PhD from Cardiff University. He is the director of the Institute of Archaeology at Pázmány Péter Catholic University and a lecturer in the Department of Arabic Studies.
NEW: Farmsteads and Funerary Sites: The M1 Junction 12 Improvements and the A5–M1 Link Road, Central Bedfordshire Archaeological investigations prior to construction, 2011 & 2015–16 by Jim Brown. Hardback; 205x290mm; xxiv+596 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £120.00). 556 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692600. £120.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692617. Book contents pageDownload

With major contributions by Paul Blinkhorn, Dana Challinor, Andy Chapman, Chris Chinnock, Joanne Clawley, Olly Dindol, Claire Finn, Val Fryer, Rebecca Gordon, Tora Hylton, Sarah Inskip, James Ladocha, Phil Mills, Stephen Morris and Jane Timby.

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) undertook extensive excavations during the construction of two separate, but adjacent road schemes, some 4.5km apart near Houghton Regis and Toddington, in south Central Bedfordshire. Taken as a whole, the excavations provide a detailed multi-period dataset for regional and national comparison.

The first evidence for occupation occurred in the middle/late Bronze Age comprising pits and clusters of postholes, including four-post and six-post structures. Two pit alignments, more than 2km apart, also indicate that land divisions were being established, and in the late Bronze Age/early Iron Age a significant new settlement emerged in the valley bottom. Parts of a further contemporary earlier-middle Iron Age settlement lay at the top of the valley but neither settlement extended into the Roman period. In the late Iron Age or early Roman period three or four new settlements emerged with occupation continuing into the late Roman period in at least one of these. Of particular interest was the recovery of two significant Aylesford-Swarling type cemeteries as well as a third cemetery which largely comprised unurned burials, including some busta, but with few accompanying grave goods.

In the late 7th-century a small probable Christian conversion open-ground inhumation cemetery was established with burials accompanied by a range of objects, including a rare work box, knives, brooches, chatelaine keys and a spearhead. Parts of three medieval settlements were uncovered including one with a potters' working area.
NEW: Piazza Armerina L'area nord dell'insediamento medievale presso la Villa del Casale edited by Carmela Bonanno. Paperback; 203x276mm; 172 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 107 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694604. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694611. Book contents pageDownload

Archaeological explorations in the area north of the Roman Villa of Casale in Piazza Armerina (Sicily) were carried out in 2013-2014. Investigations on the slopes of Monte Mangone overlooking the villa, and a survey carried out in the immediate surroundings of the hill in the Colla district, provided valuable new evidence regarding the extension of the medieval town. This exansion also impacted the areas east of the villa, and on the still existing road network that connected it to the river Gela-Nociara, in whose immediate vicinity it is now supposed there was a craft district.

The exhaustive archaeological investigations in the area demonstrate that to the north there are no structures relevant to the late antique villa, dating instead to the mid-tenth century; it is therefore an inhabited area of ​​the late Islamic era which is then abandoned and leveled. After a phase of abandonment, during which the area is sporadically used as a burial place, a Norman settlement is built, datable to the mid 11th and mid 12th century.

Sui resti della Villa tardoantica del Casale di Piazza Armerina, tra il X secolo d.C. e gli inizi dell’XI si era impiantato un vasto insediamento islamico che occupava una vasta area anche a sud e a nord della Villa, di cui è stato esplorato un ampio settore con una strada glareata su cui si aprivano le unità residenziali, alcune delle quali presentavano un cortile interno basolato in cui si trovavano anche un focolare e un forno, intorno a cui si dislocavano i vari ambienti e spesso anche una scala per l’accesso al piano superiore o al tetto. Improvvisamente l’abitato venne abbandonato e i suoi resti furono livellati ; mentre a partire dalla metà dell’XI secolo viene costruito un nuovo abitato normanno, in cui si trova un ambiente rettangolare con portico laterale, una torre difensiva sul lato corto e un silos all’esterno per la conservazione delle derrate. Era un quartiere artigianale ceramico sorto sulla riva del vicino torrente Nocciara.

Nei primi decenni del XII secolo forse per un violento terremoto che colpì la Sicilia centro orientale o in seguito alla repressione della rivolta della popolazione islamica da parte di Guglielmo I, l’abitato venne abbandonato, ma la vita in esso continuò fino all’età federiciana.

L’abitato bizantino e medievale si estendeva anche alle colline retrostanti la Villa (Monte Mangone e Colla); in particolare sulla collina di C.da Colla, durante un survay effettuato su una vasta estensione di terreno, sono state raccolte terra sigillata africana e lastrine di rivestimento in marmo pregiato, che hanno fatto ipotizzare la presenza di un esteso insediamento tardo antico sulla collina retrostante a sud della Villa del Casale.
NEW: Bar Locks and Early Church Security in the British Isles by John F. Potter. Paperback; 203x276mm; xviii+144 pages; 90 figures, 11 tables (includes 96 colour pages). 105 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693980. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693997. Book contents pageDownload

Bar Locks and Early Church Security in the British Isles examines the evidence for the measures taken to make church buildings secure or defensible from their earliest times until the later medieval period. In particular it examines the phenomenon of ‘bar locks’ which the author identifies in many different contexts throughout England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland.

Bar locks take various forms and can be made of different materials, but they all provide a means of locking a door by placing a bar behind it from the inside which is then secured onto the door frame or housings on adjacent walls. The most dramatic examples are provided by thick wooden bars slotted into recesses incorporated in the adjacent door jambs. The volume describes and lists all the examples identified by the author and also publishes his photographs of the evidence for the first time.

The recognition of the role of bar locks in securing churches led the author to consider further measures which may have been introduced to enhance church security; these measures could Have had major implications for structural change and design in the buildings. These supplementary protective requirements and methods for achieving them are many and various and are also considered in the volume.

About the Author
John F. Potter trained as a geologist (BSc Manchester) specialising in lithostratigraphy (PhD London). He served as Principal of Farnborough College of Technology in Hampshire from 1975 to 1997, was Hon. Secretary of the Institution of Environmental Sciences, and Editor for many years of the international quarterly journal, The Environmentalist. On retirement he was appointed Emeritus Professor at the University of Surrey and joined the University of Reading in order to continue with the church building fabric studies which he started in 1975.
NEW: Armenian Archaeology: Past Experiences and New Achievements edited by Aram Kosyan, Pavel Avetisyan, Arsen Bobokhyan and Yervand Grekyan. Paperback; 165x235mm; 494 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (160 colour pages). 10 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693935. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693942. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This special edition of Aramazd: Armenian Journal of Near Eastern Studies is dedicated to the 25th anniversary of the Republic of Armenia and summarises the studies conducted in Armenia in the field of archaeology (1991-2016).

Contributions included in this volume cover a significant time span, from Lower Palaeolithic to the Middle Ages. The articles summarise the archaeological surveys conducted by joint international expeditions and partly by Armenian archaeologists.

The volume also introduces the bio-bibliography of several outstanding representatives of Armenian archaeologists of the past whose activities enhanced the establishment and development of the Armenian archaeological school.
NEW: Offa’s Dyke Journal: Volume 1 for 2019 edited by Howard Williams and Liam Delaney. Paperback; 176x250mm; 162 pages; full colour throughout. 1 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695380. £25.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload

This open-access and peer-reviewed academic publication stems from the activities of the Offa’s Dyke Collaboratory, a research network founded in April 2017 to foster and support new research on the monuments and landscapes of the Anglo-Welsh borderlands and comparative studies of borderlands and frontiers from prehistory to the present. The proceedings of a series of academic and public-facing events have informed the character and direction of the Journal. Moreover, its establishment coincides with the Cadw/Historic England/Offa’s Dyke Association funded Offa’s Dyke Conservation Management Plan as well as other new community and research projects on linear earthworks. Published in print by Archaeopress in association with JAS Arqueología, and supported by the University of Chester and the Offa’s Dyke Association, the journal aims to provide a resource for scholars, students and the wider public regarding the archaeology, heritage and history of the Welsh Marches and its linear monuments. It also delivers a much-needed venue for interdisciplinary studies from other times and places.
PRE-ORDER: Middle Bronze Age and Roman Settlement at Manor Pit, Baston, Lincolnshire: Excavations 2002-2014 by Rob Atkins, Jim Burke, Leon Field and Adam Yates. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300 pages; 104 figures, 89 tables (82 plates in colour). 619 2020. ISBN 9781789695830. Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is forthcoming in Spring 2020. Click here to download the pre-order form and save 20%

Between 2002 and 2014 MOLA Northampton carried out evaluation and excavation work over an area of approximately 49.65ha ahead of mineral extraction for the quarry at the Manor Pit, Baston, Lincolnshire.

The earliest activity dated to the Neolithic with the first occupation dating to the early Bronze Age, but it was within the middle Bronze Age that significant occupation took place within the site. Part of a large co-axial field system was recorded over an area approximately c800m long and up to 310m wide. Cropmarks and the results from other archaeological excavations suggest the field system continued beyond Manor Pit for c4km and was up to 1km wide. The field system was a well-planned pastoral farming landscape at a scale suggesting that cattle and other animals were being farmed for mass trade.

The site was reoccupied in the early 2nd century AD when two adjacent Roman settlements were established. One of the settlements was arranged along a routeway which led from the Car Dyke whilst the other settlement connected to this routeway by a long straight boundary. In both settlements there were a series of fields/enclosures situated in a largely open environment, with some evidence for cultivation, areas of wet ground and stands of trees. Well/watering holes lay within these enclosures and fields indicating that stock management was a key component of the local economy.

In the later medieval period a trackway ran across the site, associated with which was a small enclosure, which perhaps contained fowl. During the early post-medieval period the land was subject to a final period of enclosure, with a series of small rectilinear fields established aligned with Baston Outgang Road, forming the basis of the current landscape.
PRE-ORDER (NEW PAPERBACK EDITION): London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 by John Schofield, Lyn Blackmore and Jacqui Pearce, with Tony Dyson. Paperback; 210x297mm; xxiv+514 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (132 colour plates). English text with summaries in French and German. Print RRP: £65.00.. 422 2020. ISBN 9781789695595. Book contents pageDownload

Please note: 2018 hardback edition is now out of print. New paperback edition publishing in March 2020.

This book is forthcoming in Spring 2020. Click here to download the pre-order form and save 20%

London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 presents and celebrates the mile-long Thames Street in the City of London and the land south of it to the River Thames as an archaeological asset. The argument is based on the reporting of four excavations of 1974–84 by the Museum of London near the north end of London Bridge: Swan Lane, Seal House, New Fresh Wharf and Billingsgate Lorry Park. Here the findings of the period 1100–1666 are presented.

Buildings and property development on sixteen properties south of Thames Street, on land reclaimed in many stages since the opening of the 12th century, include part of the parish church of St Botolph Billingsgate. The many units of land reclamation are dated by dendrochronology, coins and documents. They have produced thousands of artefacts and several hundred kilos of native and foreign pottery. Much of this artefactual material has been published, but in catalogue form (shoes, knives, horse fittings, dress accessories, textiles, household equipment). Now the context of these finds, their deposition in groups, is laid out for the first time. Highlights of the publication include the first academic analysis and assessment of a 13th- or 14th-century trumpet from Billingsgate, the earliest surviving straight trumpet in Europe; many pilgrim souvenirs; analysis of two drains of the 17th century from which suggestions can be made about use of rooms and spaces within documented buildings; and the proposal that one of the skeletons excavated from St Botolph’s church is John Reynewell, mayor of London in 1426–7 and a notable figure in London’s medieval history.

The whole publication encourages students and other researchers of all kinds to conduct further research on any aspect of the sites and their very rich artefactual material, which is held at the Museum of London’s Archaeological Archive. This is a significantly large and varied dataset for the archaeology and history of London in the period 1100 to 1666 which can be continuously interrogated for generations to come.

About the Authors
John Schofield was an archaeologist at the Museum of London from 1974 to 2008. He has written several well-received books on the archaeology of London and of British medieval towns; and as Cathedral Archaeologist for St Paul’s Cathedral, archaeological accounts of the medieval and Wren buildings. ;
Lyn Blackmore is a Senior Ceramics and Finds Specialist who has worked for MOLA and its predecessors since 1986. In 2009–14 she was Assistant Treasurer of the Medieval Pottery Research Group and in 2017 was elected co-editor of its journal Medieval Ceramics, a role she first held in 1989–94. ;
Jacqui Pearce is a Senior Ceramics Specialist with MOLA, focusing especially on medieval and later pottery, on which she has published widely. In 2017 she was elected President of the Society for Post-Medieval Archaeology. ;
Tony Dyson was the principal documentary historian and general editor at the Department of Urban Archaeology of the Museum of
PRE-ORDER: St Gregory's Minster, Kirkdale, North Yorkshire: Archaeological Investigations and Historical Context by Philip Rahtz and Lorna Watts. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300pp; 140 figures, 39 tables, 21 plates. (Print RRP: £48.00). 611 2020. ISBN 9781789694826. Buy Now

This book is forthcoming in Spring/Summer 2020. Click here to download the pre-order form and save 20%

St Gregory's Minster, Kirkdale, North Yorkshire: Archaeological Investigations and Historical Context is the result of circa 20 years of work on and around the church of St Gregory's Minster, Kirkdale, North Yorkshire. It is primarily concerned with material relating to approximately the late 8th century onwards, detailing the fabric as well as excavations around the church and in the fields immediately adjacent. Associated material culture was sparse but reflected high-status. It is open to doubt whether any building was identified to equate with the earliest Anglo-Saxon artefacts, although these are considered too numerous to have been introduced to the site subsequently. A succession of three church buildings are linked to a putative focus on the north side of the church, to which, it is argued, pre-Conquest elite burials were orientated. A pre-Conquest 'building site' to the north of the churchyard overlays an area of earlier burials.

Against the background of this data, it is argued that the area of Kirkdale may have been linked to the neighbouring Roman villa of Beadlam. The church's dedication to St Gregory is suggested to be important in understanding the milieu of its Christian origins and to its regional significance at one stage of its development. A possible evolution in the character of lordship is explored, from circumstances marked only by high-status objects to conditions that can be linked more securely to a secular family associated with the nearby town of Kirkbymoorside. Finally, Kirkdale's position in the landscape is considered and an explanation sought for the long use of this non-settlement locale.

About the Authors
Professor Philip Rahtz† was founder of the Department of Archaeology at the University of York, where he was primarily interested in equipping students with techniques that would enable them to be able to excavate and produce reports on all periods.

Lorna Watts has worked as a freelance archaeologist since the 1970s.

Provisional Table of Contents

Summary ;
Preface ;
Chapter 1: The Site of Kirkdale ;

Investigations in and around the Church ;
Chapter 2: The West Exterior ;
Chapter 3: The North Exterior ;
Chapter 4: The South Exterior ;
Chapter 5: The Chancel Exterior ;
Chapter 6: The Church Interior ;

Investigations in the locality ;
Chapter 7: Adjacent Fields ;

The Human Bones ;
Chapter 8: Human bones ;

The Artefacts ;
Chapter 9: The Artefacts ;

Synthesis ;
Chapter 10: Overview and Interpretation ;

Notes ;
References
Great Cloister: A Lost Canterbury Tale A History of the Canterbury Cloister, Constructed 1408-14, with Some Account of the Donors and their Coats of Arms by Paul A. Fox. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+694 pages; 759 illustrations, full colour throughout. 595 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693317. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693324. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Great Cloister: A Lost Canterbury Tale presents a new study of the heraldry, genealogy and history of the Canterbury Cathedral cloister. It is the first comprehensive and complete study of this monument ever undertaken, and it provides a detailed chronology as well as many new insights into the families who were donors. The monument is revealed to have been the personal project of Archbishop Thomas Arundel (d.1414), an individual closely connected with the overthrow of King Richard II. The work as a whole provides considerable insights into the revolution of 1399 and the troubled reign of Henry IV as seen through the lens of individual families.

The cloister, as originally conceived, contained 856 heraldic shields, badges and devices of which 576 were unique. Some 365 families, principalities, religious foundations and other individuals both real and imagined were represented, some with more than one shield or device. More precisely, there were 252 families, 51 peerage families, 3 English royal families (Lancaster, York and Beaufort), 20 principalities, 12 religious foundations, 9 bishops, 7 saints, 3 heroes, 4 cities or towns, 2 priests, 1 monk and 1 for God himself (in the form of the Holy Trinity). The origins and evolution of each shield represented are considered in detail.

About the Author
Dr Paul A. Fox, FHS, FSA is a retired consultant physician, medical researcher and university lecturer. He is the honorary editor of Coat of Arms: Journal of the Heraldry Society, a former Chairman of the Heraldry Society, and an Academician of the Académie Internationale d’Héraldique.
Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 4 2019 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). Paperback; vi+532 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 4 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693775. £60.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693782. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The fourth volume of the Journal of Greek Archaeology (JGA) is unusually rich and varied in content. Geographically the articles range from Sicily via Greece to Anatolia and the Near East, while chronologically they extend from the Bronze Age to the Ottoman era. Thematically there is a set of papers in landscape studies which include agricultural history, settlement geography, regional comparisons; articles on material culture which encompass metallurgy, ceramics, the links between language and artefacts, and production and trade; papers on aspects of human social science such as palaeopathology and deformity, gender studies and the representation of the supernatural; historical perspectives are finally represented by articles on fortifications and Islamisation. Of particular note is a lengthy presentation of the survey and excavation at the recently discovered Mycenaean palace in the Sparta Valley.

The review section is even broader, running from the Palaeolithic through to aspects of present-day heritage studies, and covering an equally wide field of topics.

Early Medieval Settlement in Upland Perthshire: Excavations at Lair, Glen Shee 2012-17 by David Strachan, David Sneddon and Richard Tipping. Hardback; 205x290mm; 202 pages; 85 figures; 18 tables (63 pages in colour). (RRP £29.00). 579 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693157. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693164. Book contents pageDownload

Archaeological evidence for settlement and land use in early medieval Scottish upland landscapes remains largely undiscovered. This study records only the second excavation of one important and distinctive house form, the Pitcarmicktype building, in the hills of north-east Perth and Kinross. Excavation of seven turf buildings at Lair in Glen Shee has confirmed the introduction of Pitcarmick buildings in the early 7th century AD. Clusters of these at Lair, and elsewhere in the hills, are interpreted as integrated, spatially organised farm complexes comprising byre-houses and outbuildings. Their form has more to do with contemporary traditions across the North Sea than with local styles.

There is a close link between 7th-century climatic amelioration and their spread across the hills, and it is argued that this was a purposeful re-occupation of a neglected landscape. Pitcarmick buildings were constructed and lived in by precocious, knowledgeable, and prosperous farming communities. Pollen analysis has shown the upland economy to have been arable as well as pastoral, and comparable contemporary economic ‘recovery’ is suggested from similar analyses across Scotland. The farms at Lair were stable and productive until the 11th century when changes, poorly understood, saw their demise.
About the Authors
David Strachan has worked in curatorial field archaeology in Wales, England and Scotland, at both national and local level, over the last 30 years. Having established the Historic Environment Record and planning archaeology service for Perth and Kinross in 2000, as Director of Perth and Kinross Heritage Trust he maintains interests in the Scottish ‘long’ Iron Age, intertidal and upland archaeology, and aerial photography.

David Sneddon has 20 years professional experience in archaeology, the last eight years of which were with Northlight Heritage where he was Project Manager. He recently co-founded Clyde Archaeology who provide archaeological and heritage services across the UK.

Richard Tipping has worked on problems of interpreting northern British landscapes since 1984 as a palaeo-ecologist, historical geomorphologist, geo-archaeologist and environmental historian. He has authored, co-authored and edited twelve books and more than 250 peer-reviewed and other contributions.
Experimental Archaeology: Making, Understanding, Story-telling Proceedings of a Workshop in Experimental Archaeology: Irish Institute of Hellenic Studies at Athens with UCD Centre for Experimental Archaeology and Material Culture, Dublin (Athens, 14th-15th October 2017) edited by Christina Souyoudzoglou-Haywood and Aidan O'Sullivan. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+106 pages; 96 figures, 1 table (59 pages in colour). (Print RRP £28.00). 570 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693195. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693201. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Experimental Archaeology: Making, Understanding, Story-telling is based on the proceedings of a two-day workshop on experimental archaeology at the Irish Institute of Hellenic Studies at Athens in 2017, in collaboration with UCD Centre for Experimental Archaeology and Material Culture. Scholars, artists and craftspeople explore how people in the past made things, used and discarded them, from prehistory to the Middle Ages. The papers include discussions of the experimental archaeological reconstruction and likely past experience of medieval houses, and also about how people cast medieval bronze brooches, or sharpened Bronze Age swords, made gold ornaments, or produced fresco wall paintings using their knowledge, skills and practices. The production of ceramics is explored through a description of the links between Neolithic pottery and textiles, through the building and testing of a Bronze Age Cretan pottery kiln, and through the replication and experience of Minoan figurines. The papers in this volume show that experimental archaeology can be about making, understanding, and storytelling about the past, in the present.

Aidan O’Sullivan is a Professor of Archaeology at University College Dublin, Ireland. He is Director of the UCD Centre for Experimental Archaeology and Material Culture and established the School of Archaeology’s MSc in Experimental Archaeology and Material Culture in 2016. His research interests focus on early medieval Ireland, AD 400-1100, in its northwest European context; Experimental Archaeology and Material Culture studies; and Wetland Archaeology and Environments globally. He is the author and co-author of 13 books, including Early Medieval Ireland, AD 400-1100. The evidence from archaeological excavations (Royal Irish Academy, 2013) and co-edited The Oxford Handbook of Wetland Archaeology (Oxford University Press, 2012).

Christina Souyoudzoglou-Haywood is Director of the Irish Institute of Hellenic Studies at Athens (IIHSA) and Adjunct Lecturer in the School of Classics, University College Dublin. Her main research area is the Late Bronze Age of Greece, particularly the western periphery of the Mycenaean world, focusing on the Ionian island of Kephalonia, where she has been conducting a diachronic fieldwalking survey since 2003. For many years Curator of the Classical Museum, UCD, she has published on its history and contents as well as on Greek and Cypriot antiquities in other Irish museum and university collections.
The Archaeology of Medieval Villages Currently Inhabited in Europe edited by Jesús Fernández Fernández and Margarita Fernández Mier. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+120 pages; 40 figures, 7 tables (19 colour pages). (Print RRP £30.00). 566 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693003. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693010. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The study of deserted villages abandoned during the last millennium in Europe has been the primary focus of archaeological interventions in rural settlements over recent decades. However, most of the hamlets and villages of medieval origin remain inhabited today and excavations in these small and medium-sized settlements are more unusual. The Archaeology of Medieval Villages Currently Inhabited in Europe focuses on these locations, giving examples of sites excavated in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, France, Scandinavia and Spain. The case studies highlight the diversity of problems and debates around this subject such as the meaning of the term ‘village’, the chronology beyond the last millennium with continuities, discontinuities and ruptures, the integration of research into residential and working areas, the role of local communities in research programmes and the need for multidisciplinary approaches to address all these issues. Deserted villages research along with currently-inhabited settlement excavation has the important potential to achieve long-lasting historical syntheses on medieval settlement networks in Europe. These five chapters offer challenging approaches to the above issues and proposals for future research in the field from Spain to the North Sea.

About the Editors
Jesús Fernández Fernández’s lines of research and interests focus on Medieval Archaeology, Historical Archaeology, Landscape Archaeology, GIS and Heritage studies. His recent research interests and publications focus on the landscape and settlement transformations in the Asturian area, particularly in the early medieval period. Jesús has been the director of several archaeological fieldwork projects and a member of research projects in various universities. Currently he is co-director with Gabriel Moshenska and Margarita Fernández Mier of the Villanueva de Santu Adrianu medieval settlement excavation project. Currently he is teaching and researching at Oviedo University within the programme Marie-Curie COFUND. Fernández is also a social entrepreneur and director of La Ponte-Ecomuseum, an archaeological-museological community project in Asturias, founded in 2012 and an award winner in 2016 (Leading Culture Destination Awards) and 2019 (Hispania Nostra Awards for Good Practices in Cultural Heritage).

Margarita Fernández Mier is Professor of Medieval History at the University of Oviedo (Spain). Her principal interest is the study of early medieval societies in the north-western Iberian Peninsula, as well as the settlement analysis and the organisation of agrarian landscapes research. Margarita’s work is based on written and archaeological records and a long term analysis, from Roman times to Middle Ages. She is PI of the ‘Local spaces and social complexity: the medieval roots of a twentieth-century debate (ELCOS)’ project: a interdisciplinary research group funded by the Spanish Government which aims to situate the present-day rural communities of Southern Europe as inheritors of a centuries-long experience of collective organisation from medieval times. Margarita is the lead investigator of the LLABOR research group working on Agrarian and Public Archaeology in Spain and Latin America.
The Buckley Potteries: Recent Research and Excavation by Nigel Jones. Paperback; x+122 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 551 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692228. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692235. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

With contributions by Peter Davey, Leigh Dodd, Richard Hankinson, Bob Silvester and Sophie Watson.

The small town of Buckley, in Flintshire, has been the focus for a regional pottery industry for at least 600 years, from the medieval period to the mid-20th century. However, despite Buckley’s impressive industrial past, a visit to the town today reveals little evidence to suggest the extent and importance of what was once a major industry supplying traditional earthenware.

This book is based on the results of recent research and excavation which has enhanced our understanding of the Buckley potteries, identifying over 30 individual production sites from documentary and cartographic sources. It considers the factors that influenced the siting and development of the industry, how it changed through time and the reasons for its eventual demise.

Few of the potteries have been the subject of archaeological excavation, and of those none have previously been published in detail. The book presents the results from excavations on the sites of four potteries, and includes a review of the evidence for others, including a gazetteer detailing the evidence for all of the potteries currently known.

About the Author
NIGEL JONES is the Principal Archaeologist at the Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust, where he has worked since the early 1980s. During this time he has excavated a wide range of archaeological sites from the Neolithic to industrial, the more significant of which have been published in regional and national journals. His career has focused principally on field archaeology, including numerous excavations, surveys of earthwork monuments and wider landscapes, building surveys and aerial photography. He is also a Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists.

Table of Contents
Introduction; Geology of the Buckley Area - By Richard Hankinson; Buckley Potteries and their relationship with Buckley Mountain Common – cartographic evidence - By Bob Silvester; History and Significance of the Buckley Potteries - By Peter Davey; Brookhill Pottery (Site 1), 2016 - By Richard Hankinson; Taylor’s Pottery (Site 3), 2005 - By Leigh Dodd; Lewis’s Pottery (Site 5), 2000 - By Leigh Dodd; Price’s Pottery (Site 11), 2014-15 - By Sophie Watson; A Gazetteer of Buckley Potteries; Bibliography
Mobile Peoples – Permanent Places: Nomadic Landscapes and Stone Architecture from the Hellenistic to Early Islamic Periods in North-Eastern Jordan by Harmen Huigens. Paperback; 203x276mm; 270 pages; 183 figures, 25 tables (152 pages in colour). (Print £65.00). 96 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693133. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693140. Book contents pageDownload

Mobile Peoples – Permanent Places explores the relationship between nomadic communities who resided in the Black Desert of north-eastern Jordan between c. 300 BC and 900 AD and the landscapes they inhabited and extensively modified. Although these communities were highly mobile, moving through the desert following seasonal variation in natural resources, they significantly invested in the landscapes they frequented by erecting highly durable stone architecture, and by carving rock art and inscriptions. Although these inscriptions, known as Safaitic, are relatively well studied, the archaeological remains had received little attention until recently.

This book focuses on the architectural features, including enclosures and elaborate burial cairns, that were created in the landscape some 2000 years ago and which were used and revisited on multiple occasions. It explores how nomadic communities modified these landscapes by presenting new data from remote sensing, field surveys, and excavations. To better understand the purpose of these modifications and how this changed through time, the landscape is further analysed on various temporal and geographic scales.

This book particularly deals with the archaeological landscapes of the Jebel Qurma region of north-eastern Jordan. It is part of the Landscapes of Survival project, a research programme based at Leiden University that has brought together both archaeologists and epigraphers to work on this fascinating region.

About the Author
Harmen Huigens is a landscape archaeologist who investigates processes of modifying and encountering human living space in the ancient Near East. He received his doctorate from the Faculty of Archaeology, Leiden University (2018).
The Lost Abbey of Eynsham by Steve Parrinder. Paperback; 175x245mm; 300pp; 298 illustrations. 554 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692501. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692518. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Lost Abbey of Eynsham will be of interest not just to local historians but to those with an interest in the development of monasticism and medieval art and architecture, particularly the Romanesque. Eynsham was one of the few religious foundations in England in continuous use from the late Saxon period to the Dissolution. Its first Benedictine Abbot was the internationally renowned scholar and teacher, Aelfric, and it was frequently visited by medieval kings given its close proximity to the royal hunting lodge of Woodstock. Hugh of Avalon, later canonised, was appointed Bishop of Lincoln at a royal council at Eynsham in 1186. Shortly afterwards the abbey achieved fame with the Vision of the Monk of Eynsham which is said to have influenced Dante. Its reputation was further enhanced when Eynsham acquired an important relic, the arm of St Andrew in 1240. In the later Middle Ages, the abbey went into decline and was beset by scandal. It surrendered to the Crown in 1538 and the huge structure was gradually demolished and pillaged for its building materials. Now, nothing remains in situ above ground. This book aims to rescue this important abbey from obscurity by summarising its history and examining the material remains of Eynsham Abbey, most of which have never been published before.

About the Author
Steve Parrinder read History at Kings College London before securing a PGCE and becoming a teacher in 1970. For 30 years he was at Richmond-upon-Thames College where he taught History and Archaeology and ended his professional career in 2007 as Programme Manager for Humanities. His MA in Medieval Studies was taken at Birkbeck College, London, in 1982 and his dissertation (unpublished) was on Romanesque Sculpture from Reading Abbey. He moved to Eynsham, Oxfordshire, at the end of 2012 where he is now an active member of the Eynsham History Group and has written a number of articles for the Eynsham Record. He is married with two daughters and three grandchildren.

Reviews
'This is a rather special book, and no mistake. Without ever losing sight of the core thread of the physical evidence, [the author has] managed to bring the whole story of the abbey to life, and make it so readable into the bargain. I particularly like the new material on the Post-Dissolution period.'—Alan Hardy, archaeologist, December 2019
Glass, Wax and Metal: Lighting Technologies in Late Antique, Byzantine and Medieval Times edited by Ioannis Motsianos and Karen S. Garnett. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+250 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 550 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692167. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692174. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Presenting papers from two International Lychnological Association (ILA) Round Tables, Glass, Wax and Metal: Lighting technologies in Late Antique, Byzantine and medieval times provides an extensive look at the technological development of lighting and lighting devices during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages in Western Europe and Byzantium. At a time of major economic, geopolitical and social changes, there are also radical modifications in lighting devices, as terracotta mold-made lamps, very common throughout the earlier days of the Roman Empire, are replaced by devices which use glass containers to hold oil, candles made of beeswax, and metals to create a wide variety of holders for the newer glass lamp vessels and candles. Discussions include such diverse subjects as lighting devices used in medieval times in Scandinavian mines, the Byzantine use of light for longdistance signaling, castle illumination, polykandela designs and the spiritual significance of light. The scholars have used as their source material not only artifacts from museums and excavated contexts, but also have studied written sources and depictions of lighting devices on mosaics, frescos, icons, textiles and manuscripts to help complete their notions about lighting in these eras.

About the Editors
Ioannis Motsianos, a native of Thessaloniki, has been an archaeologist at the Museum of Byzantine Culture, Thessaloniki, since 1995. He holds degrees from Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, and the University of Thessaly. His PhD dissertation at the University of Thessaly, ‘Joyful light: the artificial lighting in Byzantium’ (in Greek), Volos 2011, treats the evolution of artificial lighting during the Byzantine and Post Byzantine periods. Motsianos has written extensively on the evolution of artificial lighting during these periods, authoring more than ten papers in scientific journals. He was the lead organizer of both the ‘Lighting in Byzantium’, 4th International ILA Round-Table, 11-14 October 2011 in Thessaloniki and the Exhibition ‘Light on Light: an Illuminating Story’, Thessaloniki, Folklife & Ethnological Museum of Macedonia-Thrace, 31 October 2011-11 June 2012. He is also the co-editor of the exhibition catalogue Light on light: an illuminating story, Thessaloniki 2011. Since 2003 he has been an active member of the ‘International Lychnological Association’ and from 2009 a member of its governing Committee.

Karen Garnett was raised in Pennsylvania and California and received her degrees from Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio and the University of Texas, Austin, Texas, USA. Her archaeological research focuses on the Late Roman terracotta lamps from the Gymnasium and Fountain of the Lamps excavations in Ancient Corinth, Greece about which she has published preliminary findings and is preparing a larger volume dealing with over 2000 intact lamps from those deposits. She is also interested in and researching capacity and capability measurements for various ancient lighting methods in Peloponnesian Greece. Having a variety of careers outside academia, she currently manages the writing of technical documentation for the Intellectual Property Division of VeriSilicon Holdings, a fabless semiconductor company. Since 2009 she has been an active member of the ‘In
Porti e approdi fluviali in Italia peninsulare Dall’età romana all’anno Mille by Alessandro Luciano. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+106 pages (122pp); 60 figures (black & white throughout). Italian text. 549 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692204. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692211. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In the Imperial Age, many ports in Italy had been built in opus coementicium. The most important ones were in Latium (eg. Portus Romae, Antium and Centumcellae), in the Phlegrean Fields (portus Iulius, Misenum, Puteoli and Baiae) and along the northern-Adriatic coast (Classis-Ravenna, Aquileia and Altino). The military fleets of Augustus, in particular, were quartered in the ports of Classis and Misenum.

Most Roman ports were located at river mouths and/or in lagoon areas and were connected with inland areas by rivers or artificial canals. For this reason, port structures (piers and warehouses) were set at some distance from the sea, as in Rome (Emporium of Testaccio along the Tiber), in Pisa-San Rossore and in the Po valley.

In Late Antiquity many of the Roman ports gradually fell into disuse while others continued until the 7th century. In Ravenna, however, a new port settlement, known as Civitas Classis, came into being in the 5th century, after the creation of the suburb of Portus Romae. In the Early Middle Ages, the northern-Adriatic coast became very important in connection with trade with Constantinople. New settlements equipped with timber port structures were created at Comacchio, Cittanova and in the Venetian lagoon. If maritime trade in the Tyrrhenian Sea decreased (although to a lesser extent in Byzantine towns like Naples), river-borne traade was still dynamic and often managed by abbeys and other ecclesiastical institutions. According to historical sources, many river wharves were located along the Po while San Vincenzo abbey managed the Volturno river. The Carolingian river wharves of San Vincenzo were composed of timber, stone and, according to the Roman tradition, concrete structures. A slow recovery of maritime trades is already evident in the Carolingian Age.

This book analyses the Roman and early medieval ports of Italy and the building techniques used in their structures; it displays the elements of continuity and discontinuity revealed during these centuries.

About the Author
ALESSANDRO LUCIANO was born in 1980 and works at the National Archaeological Museum of Naples (MANN). He has a degree in Conservation of Cultural Heritage and a doctorate in Ancient Sciences. His main scientific interests relate to the transition between Antiquity and the Middle Ages, with particular regard to port structures, the cult of saints and relics, religious architecture, the evolution of the city of Naples and the processing of bone. He has devoted dozens of publications to specialized and popular journals in the field, presenting the results of his research at national and international conferences. In 2019, he published a historical novel about the last days of the life of Pliny the Elder.

Italian Description
Le coste italiane in epoca imperiale erano costellate di porti in opus coementicium, i più importanti dei quali erano nel Lazio (Portus Romae, Antium e Centumcellae ad esempio), in area flegrea (portus Iulius, Miseno, Puteoli e Baia) e sulla costa alto-adriatica (Classe-Ravenna, Aquileia ed Altino); quelli di Classe e Miseno, in particolare, alloggiavano le flotte militari istituite da Augusto.

I porti romani si trovavano generalmente alle foci di fiumi e/o in aree lagunari, ed erano collegati all’entroterra mediante i fiumi stessi o canali artificiali, ragion per cui non sono mancati rinvenimenti di strutture portuali (come banchine e magazzini) in città non costiere, come a Roma (Emporio del Testaccio lungo il Tevere), a Pisa-San Rossore e nei centri padani.

Nella tarda Antichità molti porti decaddero gradualmente, alcuni sopravvivendo fino al VII secolo. A Ravenna, invece, un nuovo insediamento portuale, noto come Civitas Classis, nacque nel V secolo, dopo che anche Portus si era trasformato in un sobborgo costiero. Nell’Altomedioevo, la costa adriatica divenne strategica in relazione ai commerci con Costantinop
Objects of the Past in the Past: Investigating the Significance of Earlier Artefacts in Later Contexts edited by Matthew G. Knight, Dot Boughton and Rachel E. Wilkinson. Paperback; 203x276mm; 77 figures, 11 tables (43 pages in colour). 89 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692488. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692495. Book contents pageDownload

How did past communities view, understand and communicate their pasts? And how can we, as archaeologists, understand this? In recent years these questions have been approached through studies of the extended occupation and use of landscapes, monuments and artefacts to explore concepts of time and memory. But what of objects that were already old in the past? Interpretations for these items have ranged from the discard of scrap to objects of veneration. Evidence from a range of periods would suggest objects of the past were an important part of many later societies that encountered them, either as heirlooms with remembered histories or rediscovered curiosities from a more distant past.

For the first time, this volume brings together a range of case studies in which objects of the past were encountered and reappropriated. It follows a conference session at the Theoretical Archaeological Group in Cardiff 2017, in which historians, archaeologists, heritage professionals and commercial archaeologists gathered to discuss this topic on a broad (pre)historical scale, highlighting similarities and contrast in depositional practices and reactions to relics of the past in different periods. Through case studies spanning the Bronze Age through to the 18th century AD, this volume presents new research demonstrating that the reappropriation of these already old objects was not anomalous, but instead represents a practice that recurs throughout (pre)history.

About the Editors
Matthew G. Knight is the curator of the Chalcolithic and Bronze Age collections at National Museums Scotland and Chair of the Later Prehistoric Finds Group. He specialises in the production, use and deposition of Bronze Age metalwork and completed his PhD on the deliberate destruction of metalwork in south-west England in 2018. He continues to be fascinated by destructive practices across Europe and is currently preparing a monograph on the subject. Matt’s MA thesis concerned out-of-time Bronze Age metalwork and he is frequently distracted by the relationship people in the past held with their own pasts and their treatment of already old material culture in the Bronze Age, or indeed any other time period.

Dot Boughton originates from Germany and is a prehistoric metalwork specialist who now works as a freelancer and translator in Cumbria. Dot did her undergraduate degree at the Freie Universität Berlin and moved to England in 1999, where she completed an MSt (2000) and MPhil (2001) in Anglo-Saxon Archaeology at the University of Oxford. In 2015 she completed her PhD dissertation on Early Iron Age socketed axes in Britain at the University of Central Lancashire. Dot was the Portable Antiquities Scheme’s Finds Liaison Officer for Lancashire and Cumbria from 2005–2017 and the Curator of Archaeology for Lancashire Museums 2017–2018. She worked for Oxford Archaeology (North) as their Finds, Archives and Environmental Officer from 2018–2019. Dot is now a freelance small finds specialist, writing metalwork reports for units and museums. She also translates historical German documents into English and vice versa.

Rachel E. Wilkinson is an archaeologist and numismatist and her AHRC-funded PhD examined the Iron Age metalwork object hoards from Britain (800 BC – AD 100), creating a national database for Iron Age object hoards which examined their contents, regional distribution and interaction with coin hoards. Previous positions during her PhD include Documentation Assistant and Project Curator: Romano-British collections at the British Museum, she currently freelances as a small finds specialist, editor and historical consultant.
Mediterranean Landscapes in Post Antiquity New frontiers and new perspectives edited by Sauro Gelichi and Lauro Olmo-Enciso. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+200 pages; illustrated throughout (87 colour pages). 555 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691900. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691917. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Mediterranean Landscapes in Post Antiquity: New frontiers and new perspectives highlights the fact that the study of landscape has in recent years been a field for considerable analytical archaeological experimentation. This new situation has made it possible to rethink the orientation of some theoretical approaches to the subject; equally these methods have been profitably used for the formation of a new theoretical and conceptual framework. These analytical trends have also featured in the Mediterranean area. Although the Mediterranean is the home of classicism (which also defines a particular archaeological methodology), it has seen the implementation of projects of this new kind, and in regions of Spain and Italy, after some delay, the proliferation of landscape archaeology studies. There are examples of more-or-less sophisticated postcolonial archaeological work, albeit conducted at the same time as examples of unreconstructed colonial archaeology. It is not easy to resolve a situation like this which requires the full integration of the different national archaeological cultures into a truly global forum. But some reflection on the cultural differences between the various landscape archaeologies, at least in the West is required. These considerations have given rise to the idea of this book which examines these themes in the framework of the Mediterranean area.

About the Editors
Sauro Gelichi is Professor of Medieval Archaeology at the University of Ca’ Foscari, Venice. He is main editor of Archeologia Medievale. His recent research interests and publications focus on the settlement in the Adriatic sea (i.e. Venice, Comacchio), particularly in the early medieval period. He has published proceedings of the International Conferences (From one Sea to Another. Trading Places in the European and Mediterranean Early Middle Ages, Turnhout 2012); Venice and its Neighbors from the 8th to the 10th Century. Through Renovation and Continuity, Leiden 2018) and archaeological editions of the archaeological excavations (Nonantola 6. Monaci e contadini. Abati e re. Il monastero di Nonantola attraverso l’archeologia (2002-2009), Florence 2018).

Lauro Olmo-Enciso is Professor of Archaeology at the Department of History and Philosophy, University of Alcalá, (Alcalá de Henares, Madrid). His lines of research and interests focuse on Medieval Archaeology, Historical Archaeology, Landscape Archaeology and Heritage. He directs archaeological excavations in different medieval sites, such as the Visigothic royal foundation of Recópolis; he was in charge of intervention projects in Spain-UNESCO World Heritage sites such as the ones related to the historical buildings of the University of Alcalá and the city of Segovia. He co-directs an Ecuadorian-Spanish project about the impact of colonialism on indigenous populations in Manabí (Ecuador). He has written and published many essays, editorial works, books, book chapters and articles in national and international scientific journals.
Brass from the Past Brass made, used and traded from prehistoric times to 1800 by Vanda Morton. Paperback; 175x245mm; viii+358 pages; 91 figures, 53 tables (10 pages in colour). 536 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691566. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691573. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Brass from the Past is not only a history of the use and production of brass, but more broadly an insight into the journey of this important metal in the context of a changing and modernising world.

The book follows the evolution of brass from its earliest forms around 2500 BC through to industrialised production in the eighteenth century. The story is told in the context of the people, economies, cultures, trade and technologies that have themselves defined the alloy and its spread around the world. It explores innovations, such as the distillation of zinc, that have improved the quality and ease of production. From national or religious priorities to exhaustion of raw material supplies, the themes from the past are echoed in our own world today. In the later centuries, the book shines a light on some of the more personal aspects of people, businesses and relationships that have influenced industry and its progress.

Above all the book reflects the enthusiasm, not just of the author, but of all brass enthusiasts across the world. The search for information has involved scrambling down Bohemian ravines, stumbling over brass-works debris under trees, and studying pre-civil-war artefacts in Virginia. Academics and experts from across the world have provided information, from China to Qatar and the USA to the Czech Republic.

Brass is a strong and attractive metal, which has been used to create items of great beauty and utility. It is hoped that the reader will come to value the qualities of this material which has become a passion for so many people around the world.

About the Author
Vanda Morton MA PhD is based in Oxford and offers an authoritative voice on the history and archaeology of brass. Her research has involved metallurgical research, fieldwork and international networking.

She draws on interpersonal skills developed early in her professional life in psychiatric healthcare, and on illustrating skills acquired during her later occupation in graphic design which culminated in an academic career in archaeology. Her international research has taken her to muddy fields, mountains, forests, and rushing streams, and into homes, castles, laboratories and museums. These adventures have exploited her enthusiasm for foreign languages, love of walking, and joy at meeting the many and various people who have introduced her to different cultures, sites and archaeological treasures.
The Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Text and Archaeology by Justin L. Kelley. Paperback; 175x245mm; 47 figures, 1 table (Black & white throughout). (Print RRP £48.00). 489 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690569. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690576. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, was built by the Byzantine emperor Constantine I to commemorate the Passion of Jesus Christ. Encased within its walls are the archaeological remains of a small piece of ancient Jerusalem ranging in date from the 8th century BC through the 16th century AD, at which time the Turkish Ottoman Empire ushered Jerusalem into the modern period. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre was the subject of extensive archaeological investigation between 1960 and 1981 during its restoration. With the development of non-destructive techniques of archaeological research, investigation within the church has continued, which led to the restoration and conservation of the shrine built over the Tomb of Jesus in 2017. The first part of this monograph focuses on the archaeological record of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, surveying past excavations as well as recent research carried out within the church over the past three decades. The archaeological survey provides historical context for the second part of the book—a collection of primary sources pertinent to the history of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The texts included here range in date from the 1st century AD to the mid-19th century and are presented in their original languages with English translation.

About the Author
JUSTIN L. KELLEY teaches classes in Christian history and biblical studies at Life Pacific College. Justin specializes in the history and culture of the ancient Near East and spent several years as a student in Israel, where he studied biblical historical geography and archaeology at Jerusalem University College and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
Tentsmuir: Ten Thousand Years of Environmental History by Robert M. M. Crawford. Paperback; 254x203mm; vi+190 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. 519 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691245. £24.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691252. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Tentsmuir has been a scene of human activity for over 10,000 years. It witnessed one of the earliest known occurrences in Scotland of Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and has supported human activities throughout the Neolithic and Iron Age. In medieval times it was a home for the Norman nobility, and then a royal hunting forest with highly-valued fishing rights for Scottish Kings.

Tentsmuir is prone to flooding in winter due to the front line of dunes blocking drainage to the sea. It provides a natural refuge for a wide range of plants, as well as resident and migrating birds, and other animals, including outstanding populations of butterflies and moths. Consequently, this led to the creation in 1954 of a National Nature Reserve at the north-eastern end of the Tentsmuir Peninsula. Initially, an active period of coastal accretion more than trebled the size of the reserve. Now, however, Tentsmuir is eroding in places. The probability of rising sea levels and increasing exposure to storms may cause a level of destruction such that the physical existence and biological future of Tentsmuir cannot be guaranteed.

This book is an attempt to record how even within a limited geographical area, such as this peninsula on the east coast of Scotland, plant and animal communities are constantly reacting to environmental change. Frequently, it is difficult to decide whether or not these changes should be resisted, encouraged, or ignored. Examples are provided of instances where human intervention to counteract change has resulted in negative as well as positive consequences for biodiversity.

About the Author
ROBERT M. M. CRAWFORD is a graduate of the Universities of Glasgow and Liège. Postdoctoral years were spent at the Bakh Institute of Biochemistry in Moscow and at the biochemistry and botany departments of the Universities of Freiburg, Munich, and Oxford. From 1962 – 1999 he taught and researched at the University of St Andrews, pursuing in particular the study of the physiological ecology of plants in a wide range of habitats in Scotland, Scandinavia, North and South America, and the Arctic. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the Linnean Society of London, and an associate member of the Belgian Royal Academy of Sciences.
RACTA 2018: Ricerche di Archeologia Cristiana, Tardantichità e Altomedioevo edited by Chiara Cecalupo, Giovanna Assunta Lanzetta and Priscilla Ralli. Paperback; 203x276; 248 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 20 plates in colour. Papers in Italian, English, French and German. Introduction and abstracts in English. (Print RRP £45.00). 84 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691740. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691757. Book contents pageDownload

RACTA (Ricerche di Archeologia Cristiana, Tardantichità e Altomedioevo) was the first international conference for PhD students of Christian Archaeology. It took place in Rome in February 2018, hosted by Pontificio Istituto di Archeologia Cristiana and gathered more than 50 multidisciplinary talks and posters from PhD students from Europe, America and Russia. The engagement shown at the well-attended event, and the interest of several institutions, proved that Christian archaeology continues to be important to new generations of archaeologists, art historians, and researchers of the ancient world.

About the Editors
CHIARA CECALUPO has a PhD in History of Christian Archaeology from the Pontificio Istituto di Archeologia Cristiana (‘La Roma Sotterranea di Antonio Bosio e i primi collezionisti di antichità cristiane’), and is a researcher and teaching assistant at the University of Pisa. Her work concerns the history of archaeology and collections.

GIOVANNA ASSUNTA LANZETTA is a PhD student at The Pontificio Istituto di Archeologia Cristiana (‘La basilica di Santa Eufemia a Grado’). Her research focusses on early Christian architecture with the support of new technologies (such as 3D reconstructions) and on Christian and medieval topography.

PRISCILLA RALLI is a PhD student at the Pontificio Istituto di Archeologia Cristiana (thesis “L’architettura paleocristiana del Peloponneso”) in agreement with the Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Atene (SAIA-IASA) and with a scholarship (related to the study of Argos and the Argolid during the Late Antiquity) from the Ecole Française d’Athènes (EFA).
Dhofar Through the Ages An Ecological, Archaeological and Historical Landscape by Lynne S. Newton and Juris Zarins. Paperback; 210x297mm; xvi+132 pages; 61 figures, 47 tables (colour throughout). 521 2019 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691603. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691610. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Dhofar, the southern governorate of Oman, lies within a distinctive ecological zone due to the summer Southwest Monsoon. It is home to numerous indigenous succulent plants, the most famous of which is frankincense (Boswellia sacra). The region, tied in the past to both Oman and Yemen, has a long and distinguished archaeological past stretching back to the Lower Paleolithic ca. 1.5 my BP. Dhofar is also home to a distinctive people, the Modern South Arabian Languages speakers (MSAL) since at least the last 15,000 years. Ancient Zafar (Al-Habudi), now called Al-Baleed, and its successor Salalah was and is the province’s largest city. From the seventh century onwards until the arrival of the Portuguese in 1504 AD Al-Baleed dominated the central southern Arabian coastline politically and economically. Archaeological surveys and excavations in the governorate, beginning in 1954, have brought to light Dhofar’s ancient past.

About the Authors
LYNNE S. NEWTON received her doctorate from the University of Minnesota with research on the Iron Age and Islamic periods in the Mahra Governorate of Yemen. Since 2007, she has co-directed excavations at the Medieval port of Al-Baleed and the general archaeological survey of Dhofar. Between 2011 and 2014, she was Curator of Maritime History at the National Museum of Qatar. The author published numerous research articles on Dhofar and the Mahra Governate, including also her doctorate A Landscape of Pilgrimage and Trade in Wadi Masila Yemen (2009) and is co-author of the Atlas of Archaeological Survey in Governorate of Dhofar, Sultanate of Oman (2013).

JURIS ZARINS is retired Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology at Missouri State University. He has excavated sites from the Lower Paleolithic to the Ottoman period in Mesopotamia (Turkey and Iraq) and more recently in the Arabian Peninsula, with a specific focus on the development of pastoral nomadism in Arabia and the origins of the Bedouin. Between 1992 and 2011, he worked in the Sultanate of Oman to uncover the Medieval port of al-Baleed and to conduct a general archaeological survey of Dhofar. The author has published many scientific research articles, including Dhofar: The Land of Incense (2001) and The Domestication of Equids in Ancient Mesopotamia (2014).
Anglo-Saxon Crops and Weeds: A Case Study in Quantitative Archaeobotany by Mark McKerracher. Paperback; 203x276mm; viii+204 pages; 53 figures, 33 tables (4 plates in colour). (Print RRP £35.00). 85 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691924. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691931. Book contents pageDownload

There is a growing recognition within Anglo-Saxon archaeology that farming practices underwent momentous transformations in the Mid Saxon period, between the seventh and ninth centuries AD: transformations which underpinned the growth of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms and, arguably, set the trajectory for English agricultural development for centuries to come. Meanwhile, in the field of archaeobotany, a growing set of quantitative methods has been developed to facilitate the systematic investigation of agricultural change through the study of charred plant remains. This study applies a standardised set of repeatable quantitative analyses to the charred remains of Anglo-Saxon crops and weeds, to shed light on crucial developments in crop husbandry between the seventh and ninth centuries. The analyses demonstrate the significance of the Anglo-Saxon archaeobotanical record in elucidating how greater crop surpluses were attained through ecologically-sensitive diversification and specialisation strategies in this period. At the same time, assumptions, variables and key parameters are presented fully and explicitly to facilitate repetition of the work, thus also enabling the book to be used as a source of comparative data and a methodological handbook for similar research in other periods and places. It constitutes a specialist, data-driven companion volume to the author’s more general narrative account published as Farming Transformed in Anglo-Saxon England (Windgather, 2018).

About the Author
MARK MCKERRACHER is a Postdoctoral Researcher in the School of Archaeology at the University of Oxford, where he completed his DPhil – studying Mid Saxon agriculture – in 2014. After working in museum archiving, software development and freelance archaeobotany, he is currently researching medieval farming practices as part of the ERC-funded Feeding Anglo-Saxon England project (FeedSax). His interests include archaeobotany, database development, agricultural production and Anglo-Saxon archaeology, and he writes a popular blog – The Corn Lore – which explores the science, culture, economy, history and archaeology of cereals (www.mjmckerracher.co.uk).
Profane Death in Burial Practices of a Pre-Industrial Society: A study from Silesia by Paweł Duma. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+122 pages; 66 figures, 6 tables (31 plates in colour). 506 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690897. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690903. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Profane Death in Burial Practices of a Pre-Industrial Society: A study from Silesia discusses phenomena characteristic of the funeral practices of the pre-industrial society of Silesia (Poland). The author explores specific groups of people: unbaptised children, women who died in childbirth, suicides, convicts and those who perished in epidemics, who were refused an honorary burial in consecrated land or had ceremonies conducted on special terms. Also discussed are the places where the bodies of these excluded individuals were interred. The study is supplemented by an analysis of the results of archaeological research, which mainly involved fieldwork carried out at former execution sites. The skeletal remains of numerous convicts were discovered during these investigations, together with the remnants of stonebuilt gallows. This analysis is especially relevant for interpreting selected funeral finds, socalled ‘vampire burials’, and the general question of atypical treatment of bodies perceived as unworthy, badly-deceased or ‘unclean’. The research subject is novel, as no similar synthetic studies on unusual funerary practices have yet been conducted in Polish archaeology for this particular era and territory. The author is primarily concerned with cases mentioned in historical and archaeological sources from the region of Silesia, but evidence from beyond this area is also presented. Chronologically the study covers the period between the 15th and early 19th centuries.

About the Author
PAWEŁ DUMA is Assistant Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University of Wroclaw, Poland. His main interests concern historical archaeology, profane death, late medieval and post-medieval material culture. Has excavated historical execution sites in Silesia both as team member and as a supervisor. He is author and co-author of several articles published in Polish and international scholarly journals.