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NEW: The Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Text and Archaeology by Justin L. Kelley. Paperback; 175x245mm; 47 figures, 1 table (Black & white throughout). (Print RRP £48.00). 489 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690569. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690576. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, was built by the Byzantine emperor Constantine I to commemorate the Passion of Jesus Christ. Encased within its walls are the archaeological remains of a small piece of ancient Jerusalem ranging in date from the 8th century BC through the 16th century AD, at which time the Turkish Ottoman Empire ushered Jerusalem into the modern period. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre was the subject of extensive archaeological investigation between 1960 and 1981 during its restoration. With the development of non-destructive techniques of archaeological research, investigation within the church has continued, which led to the restoration and conservation of the shrine built over the Tomb of Jesus in 2017. The first part of this monograph focuses on the archaeological record of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, surveying past excavations as well as recent research carried out within the church over the past three decades. The archaeological survey provides historical context for the second part of the book—a collection of primary sources pertinent to the history of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The texts included here range in date from the 1st century AD to the mid-19th century and are presented in their original languages with English translation.

About the Author
JUSTIN L. KELLEY teaches classes in Christian history and biblical studies at Life Pacific College. Justin specializes in the history and culture of the ancient Near East and spent several years as a student in Israel, where he studied biblical historical geography and archaeology at Jerusalem University College and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
NEW: Europa Postmediaevalis 2018 Post-medieval pottery between (its) borders edited by Gabriela Blažková and Kristýna Matějková. Paperback; 210x297mm; viii+298 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 540 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691887. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691894. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This anthology is a collection of works from the Europa Postmediaevalis conference held in Prague in the spring of 2018. As the name of the conference suggests, the subject of interest is the Early Modern period (15th to 18th century) and the manner in which this relatively young discipline within the field of archaeology is approached in Europe.

The first year of the conference set the goal of searching for topics in post-medieval archaeology that reflect their current situation while simultaneously addressing a broader group of scholars. Therefore, it is hardly surprising that the central theme pursued by generations across Europe proved to be Early Modern ceramics, the large assemblages of which are, for many of us, the bread and butter of our daily lives – a delight and often a headache resulting from their further processing. Since this issue is the one perceived most acutely in the Czech Republic, the organisers decided to share their current quandaries in this field with both domestic and foreign colleagues.

The long-term objective of the conference is to create a professional platform with a uniform communication language (English) and a biennial periodicity allowing scholars to meet regularly to exchange experience gained in their study and work in post-medieval archaeology. The articles published in this anthology reflect the current state of research of Early Modern pottery in individual European countries (the Czech Republic, Croatia, Italy, Hungary, Germany, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Switzerland), including both successes and possible shortcomings. The individual studies should serve as impulses for further study, ideas for thought and discussion and, last but not least, as study material for those who come into contact with Early Modern material culture as part of their work.

About the Editors
GABRIELA BLAŽKOVÁ studied archaeology and history at the Faculty of Arts of Charles University in Prague, where she earned her PhD in 2011. Today she works as an archaeologist at the Institute of Archaeology of the Czech Academy of Sciences in Prague. She is an expert in Late Medieval and Early Modern Archaeology (the second half of the 15th century–first half of 17th century in particular) with an emphasis on material culture. She has also been involved in rescue archaeological research in Prague – Hradčany.

KRISTÝNA MATĚJKOVÁ studied archaeology at Masaryk University in Brno and entered the doctoral programme at Charles University in Prague. Her main interest is the issue of processing medieval and Early Modern assemblages from Czech towns. She is currently writing her PhD dissertation on the issue of assemblages from Prague cesspits dating to the end of the 17th century and the 18th century. Her research interest is currently focussed on the popularisation of archaeology and interactive childhood education as part of the HistoryPark project.
NEW: Arqueología funeraria y paleopatología de la población religiosa de Jerez en época moderna: una primera aproximación by Gonzalo Castro Moreno. Paperback; 203x276mm; 378 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (272 plates in colour). Spanish text. (Print RRP £95.00). 80 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691429. £95.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691436. Book contents pageDownload

The main objective of this book has been to open a line of research into the religious population of the city of Jerez de la Frontera, in southern Spain, during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries – the ‘Modern Age’ - which until now has not been thoroughly investigated. The research focusses on the archaeological and paleopathological remains of the religious population. The archaeological excavations were supported with the existing archival material, and enabled the first assessment of Jerez society to be carried out, including a whole series of elements that have not been studied thus far, such as the causes of death and disease suffered by the people of the city.

To this end, a study was carried out examining the pathologies found in the skeletal remains housed at the municipal archaeological museum of Jerez de la Frontera, which originated mainly from epidemic burials.

Spanish Description El principal objetivo de este libro ha sido abrir una línea de investigación hasta ahora inédita en la ciudad de Jerez de la Frontera, en el sur de España, la cual es el estudio social a través de los restos arqueológicos y paleopatológicos de la población religiosa en la ciudad durante la Edad Moderna, y más concretamente los siglos XVI y XVII. En base a las intervenciones arqueológicas realizadas y con el apoyo del material de archivo existente hemos podido llevar a cabo una primera valoración de la sociedad jerezana con toda una serie de elementos hasta ahora no estudiados, como son las causas de muerte y enfermedades sufridas por los habitantes de la ciudad.

Para ello se ha realizado un estudio con las patologías halladas en los restos óseos de los depósitos del museo arqueológico municipal de Jerez de la Frontera, y que fueron hallados principalmente en enterramientos epidémicos. Igualmente se ha podido exponer un principio de localización de las zonas usadas como lugares inhumación y su posterior uso tras el cambio en las costumbres funerarias a principios del siglo XIX, con lo que se ha realizado una visión de la influencia en el ámbito del nuevo urbanismo de la ciudad.

Resumen
Doctor en historia por la Universidad de Cádiz (2016), con la siguiente tésis doctoral: Arqueología Funeraria y Paleopatología de la población religiosa de Jerez en época moderna: Una primera aproximación, dirigida por los doctores Dario Bernal y Miguel Botella de la Universidad de Cádiz y de Granada respectivamente. Licenciado en historia por la Universidad de Sevilla (2003), Master en Patrimonio Histórico Arqueológico por la Universidad de Cádiz (2010), con la tesina titulada: La Cripta del Teatro Thebussem (Medina Sidonia, Cádiz), una primera aproximación antropológica y paleopatológica a la comunidad religiosa de los siglos XVII y XVIII.
FORTHCOMING: La defensa de la ciudad de Valencia 1936-1939 Una arqueología de la Guerra Civil Española by José Peinado Cucarella. Paperback; 203x276mm; 236 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (51 colour pages). Spanish text. (Print RRP £44.00). 87 2019. ISBN 9781789692020. Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication presents the defense of the city of Valencia during the years 1936-1939 under two premises; whether Valencia was strategically bombed and which were the targets. The second premise is whether the city was efficiently organized to protect its civilians.

The methodological proposal is based on the use of the classical parameters of the archaeological intervention, with the possibility of elaborating catalogs of goods, thematic, temporary, etc. Those derived in tools for urban planning, archaeological charts, and other documents.

It also carries out a comparative analysis of the current legislative framework at national and regional level (Murcia, Valencia and Catalonia). A classification is made of the elements that make up the different heritages and their main characteristics.

It Analyzes the documentation from 1936 to 1939 collected in the different archives: the Municipal of Valencia, the Diputación, the Historical Military of Ávila, the Intermediate Military of Valencia, the Military Library "Center of Cultures", the Hemeroteca Municipal and The Library of the City of Valencia.

All this is done through extensive prospecting and GPS, with planimetric surveys of the localized remains and the digitalization of the entire planimetry of the time. A planimetric map of all shelters in the city is elaborated and the village of Puig. Moreover, a glossary of military terminology is added with the purpose of helping the reader, in addition to a daily list of the bombings that the city suffered during the years 1937 to 1939.

Esta publicación nos muestra la defensa de la ciudad de Valencia durante los años de 1936-1939 bajo dos premisas; una que es saber cuales fueron los más sensibles y bombardeados y si responden a la idea de un bombardeo estratégico. La segunda premisa es si la ciudad dispuso de una organización eficiente para proteger a su población civil. La propuesta metodológica se basa en la utilización de los parámetros clásicos de la intervención arqueológica, con la posibilidad de elaborar catálogos de bienes, temáticos, temporales, etc... que puedan derivar en herramientas para el planeamiento urbanístico, en cartas arqueológicas, y demás documentos.

En ella también se realiza una análisis comparativo del marco legislativo actual tanto a nivel nacional como autonómico (Murcia, Valencia y Cataluña). Se realiza una clasificación de los elementos que conforman los distintos patrimonios y sus principales características con el fin de disponer de una base teórica donde situar los restos arqueológicos y documentales localizados, distinguiendo su naturaleza en activa (militar) centros de Resistencias, Defensa de Costa y aeródromos, y por otra la pasiva (civil) como los refugios.

Se han analizado la documentación referente a 1936 a 1939, recogida en los diferentes archivos, el Municipal de Valencia, el de la Diputación, el Histórico Militar de Ávila, el Militar Intermedio de Valencia, La Biblioteca Militar ‘Centro de Culturas’, la Hemeroteca Municipal y La Biblioteca Valenciana.

Todo ello se realiza mediante la prospección extensiva y mediante GPS, con levantamientos planimétricos de los restos localizados y la digitalización de toda la planimetría de la época. Se establece como unidad gestora de la documentación el GvSIG, un software libre, que permite combinar datos geográficos, bases de datos con datos vectoriales y raster. Y se elabora una cartoteca planimétrica de todos los refugios conocidos en la ciudad de Valencia, y de los elementos más esenciales de la defensa activa del municipio del Puig. Así como un glosario de terminología militar con el objeto que ayude al lector y un listado diario de los bombardeos que sufrió la ciudad durante los años 1937 a 1939.

About the Author
JOSÉ PEINADO is a PHD in archaeology in the University of Valencia and with a degree in History and an extensive experience i
FORTHCOMING: The Buckley Potteries: Recent Research and Excavation by Nigel Jones. Paperback; 94pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (Print RRP £25.00). 551 2019. ISBN 9781789692228. Buy Now

With contributions by Peter Davey, Leigh Dodd, Richard Hankinson, Bob Silvester and Sophie Watson.

The small town of Buckley, in Flintshire, has been the focus for a regional pottery industry for at least 600 years, from the medieval period to the mid-20th century. However, despite Buckley’s impressive industrial past, a visit to the town today reveals little evidence to suggest the extent and importance of what was once a major industry supplying traditional earthenware.

This book is based on the results of recent research and excavation which has enhanced our understanding of the Buckley potteries, identifying over 30 individual production sites from documentary and cartographic sources. It considers the factors that influenced the siting and development of the industry, how it changed through time and the reasons for its eventual demise.

Few of the potteries have been the subject of archaeological excavation, and of those none have previously been published in detail. The book presents the results from excavations on the sites of four potteries, and includes a review of the evidence for others, including a gazetteer detailing the evidence for all of the potteries currently known.

About the Author
NIGEL JONES is the Principal Archaeologist at the Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust, where he has worked since the early 1980s. During this time he has excavated a wide range of archaeological sites from the Neolithic to industrial, the more significant of which have been published in regional and national journals. His career has focused principally on field archaeology, including numerous excavations, surveys of earthwork monuments and wider landscapes, building surveys and aerial photography. He is also a Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists.

Table of Contents
Introduction; Geology of the Buckley Area - By Richard Hankinson; Buckley Potteries and their relationship with Buckley Mountain Common – cartographic evidence - By Bob Silvester; History and Significance of the Buckley Potteries - By Peter Davey; Brookhill Pottery (Site 1), 2016 - By Richard Hankinson; Taylor’s Pottery (Site 3), 2005 - By Leigh Dodd; Lewis’s Pottery (Site 5), 2000 - By Leigh Dodd; Price’s Pottery (Site 11), 2014-15 - By Sophie Watson; A Gazetteer of Buckley Potteries; Bibliography
FORTHCOMING: Aleksei P. Okladnikov: The Great Explorer of the Past A biography of a Soviet archaeologist by A. K. Konopatskii, translated by Richard L. Bland and Yaroslav V. Kuzmin. Paperback; 148x210mm; vi+480 pages; 29 figures (6 pages in colour). (Print RRP £39.99). 547 2019 Archaeological Lives . ISBN 9781789692044. Buy Now

Aleksei P. Okladnikov: The Great Explorer of the Past presents the life and works of Aleksei P. Okladnikov (1908–1981), a prominent archaeologist who spent more than 50 years studying prehistoric sites in various parts of the Soviet Union – mainly in Siberia and Central Asia as well as in Mongolia. Okladnikov made numerous fascinating discoveries in the 1930s, including the first Neanderthal fossils in the USSR at Teshik Tash (Uzbekistan) and unique figurines at the Upper Palaeolithic site of Buret’ in the Angara River basin (Eastern Siberia). His research and achievements are shown on the background of ideological campaigns inspired by the Communist Party in the 1920s–1950s; this subject is very rarely described in non-Russian sources. Particular attention is given to the debunking of the ‘Japhetic theory’ and the ‘new doctrine of language’ developed by Nikolai Y. Marr, an Oriental scholar and specialist in languages who in the 1920s–early 1930s was a formal leader of Soviet archaeology. Marr’s principles of linguistic studies were mechanically transmitted to several fields of the humanities, including archaeology, and were mandatory for every Soviet scholar. In 1950 an abrupt end to Marr’s theories was enacted by Josef Stalin. Details of these events – important for development of archaeology, ancient history, and linguistics in the USSR – were never previously described.

This volume will appeal to archaeologists, historians, and anyone interested in the history of science (particularly the humanities) in the twentieth century.

About the Author
ALEKSANDER K. KONOPATSKII was born in 1951 in Tambovka County, Amur Province, USSR. After graduating from Suvorov’s Military Boarding School in Ussuriisk (Maritime Province), he met Aleksei P. Okladnikov in 1969. Konopatskii became a cadet at the Novosibirsk Military-Political Academy but dropped out in 1972 and joined the Institute of History, Philology and Philosophy, Siberian Branch of the USSR Academy of Sciences. After that, he closely associated with Okladnikov, assisting in fieldwork, travel and the preparation of scientific reports. In 1974, Konopatskii graduated in History (including archaeology) from Kemerovo State University. Later that decade, he studied prehistoric sites on the shore of Lake Baikal in Siberia, and gained the Candidate of Sciences (Ph.D.-equivalent) degree in 1979; in the 1980s – early 1990s, he excavated ancient sites in the lower course of the Amur River (Russian Far East).

Since 1998, Konopatskii has been an Assistant Professor of the Novosibirsk General Military Academy, where he teaches humanities.
FORTHCOMING: Conflict Landscapes: An Archaeology of the International Brigades in the Spanish Civil War by Salvatore Garfi. Paperback; 175x245mm; 220pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £35.00). 530 2019. ISBN 9781789691344. Buy Now

This book is an archaeological exploration of the conflict landscapes encountered by volunteers of the International Brigades in the Spanish Civil War of 1936-39. A great deal is known about the Brigades in terms of inter-world war geopolitics, their history and make-up. But less is known about the materiality of the landscapes in which they lived, fought, and died.

The Spanish Civil War was a relatively static conflict. As in the First World War, it consisted of entrenched Republican government lines facing similarly entrenched Nationalist (rebel) lines, and these ran north to south across Spain. Fighting was intermittent, so the frontline soldiers had to settle in, and make what was an attritional war-scape, a place to live in and survive. This research examines one such war-scape as a place of ‘settlement’, where soldiers lived their daily lives as well as confronting the rigours of war – and these were the volunteers of the International Brigades, both foreign and Spanish, who occupied a section of lines southeast of Zaragoza in Aragón in 1937 and 1938.

This research draws, not only on the techniques of landscape archaeology, but also on the writings of international volunteers in Spain – in particular, George Orwell – and it incorporates historical photography as a uniquely analytical, archaeological resource.

About the Author
SALVATORE GARFI has been a professional archaeologist since 1974, working on a range of projects from the prehistoric to the contemporary. Besides working in Britain, he has worked in Egypt, Southern Arabia, and elsewhere in the Middle East. Since 2010, he has specialised in the archaeology of modern conflict, and his doctoral research was on the late 20th Century conflict in Western Sahara. He was a post-doctoral Leverhulme Fellow in the School of Cultures, Languages and Area Studies, University of Nottingham (2015-2018), and co-founder of the International Brigades Archaeological Project (IBAP), which ran from 2014 to 2015.

Table of Contents

List of Figures
Acknowledgements
PART ONE
Chapter 1: Introduction
Chapter 2: The Spanish Civil War
PART TWO
Chapter 3: On Trenches and Field Fortifications
Chapter 4: Trench Systems as Settlement Archaeology: The Salient at Mediana de Aragón
PART THREE
Chapter 5: Experiencing the Mediana Lines
Chapter 6: An Archaeology from Photographs: Imaging the Aragón Front Lines
Chapter 7: History in ‘Three Dimensions’
Appendix: Tables
Bibliography
Profane Death in Burial Practices of a Pre-Industrial Society: A study from Silesia by Paweł Duma. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+122 pages; 66 figures, 6 tables (31 plates in colour). 506 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690897. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690903. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Profane Death in Burial Practices of a Pre-Industrial Society: A study from Silesia discusses phenomena characteristic of the funeral practices of the pre-industrial society of Silesia (Poland). The author explores specific groups of people: unbaptised children, women who died in childbirth, suicides, convicts and those who perished in epidemics, who were refused an honorary burial in consecrated land or had ceremonies conducted on special terms. Also discussed are the places where the bodies of these excluded individuals were interred. The study is supplemented by an analysis of the results of archaeological research, which mainly involved fieldwork carried out at former execution sites. The skeletal remains of numerous convicts were discovered during these investigations, together with the remnants of stonebuilt gallows. This analysis is especially relevant for interpreting selected funeral finds, socalled ‘vampire burials’, and the general question of atypical treatment of bodies perceived as unworthy, badly-deceased or ‘unclean’. The research subject is novel, as no similar synthetic studies on unusual funerary practices have yet been conducted in Polish archaeology for this particular era and territory. The author is primarily concerned with cases mentioned in historical and archaeological sources from the region of Silesia, but evidence from beyond this area is also presented. Chronologically the study covers the period between the 15th and early 19th centuries.

About the Author
PAWEŁ DUMA is Assistant Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University of Wroclaw, Poland. His main interests concern historical archaeology, profane death, late medieval and post-medieval material culture. Has excavated historical execution sites in Silesia both as team member and as a supervisor. He is author and co-author of several articles published in Polish and international scholarly journals.
Human Mobility in Archaeology: Practices, Representations and Meanings Ex Novo: Journal of Archaeology, Volume 3, 2018 edited by Maja Gori, Martina Revello Lami and Alessandro Pintucci. 3 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691214. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload

It has been abundantly demonstrated that theories and paradigms in the humanities are influenced by historical, economic and socio-cultural conditions, which have profoundly influenced archaeology’s representation of migration. This was mostly conceived as the study of the movement of large and homogenous population groups, whose identity was often represented as ethnically characterized. The present-day shift of attention from collective to individual agency and the countless facets of migration goes hand in hand with new socio-political and cultural scenarios such as the extraordinary migratory flows into Europe, shifting boundaries, alternative forms of citizenship and identity, and the emergence of emotive reactionism.

The third issue of Ex Novo gathers multidisciplinary contributions addressing mobility to understand patterns of change and continuity in past worlds; reconsider the movement of people, objects, and ideas alongside mobile epistemologies, such as intellectual, scholarly or educative traditions, rituals, practices, religions and theologies; and provide insights into the multifaceted relationship between mobile practices and their shared meanings and how they are represented socially and politically.

Table of Contents
Maja GORI, Martina REVELLO LAMI & Alessandro PINTUCCI
Editorial: Practices, Representations and Meanings of Human Mobility in Archaeology

Paraskevi ELEFANTI & Gilbert MARSHALL
Mobility during the Upper Palaeolithic Greece: Some Suggestions for the Argolid Peninsula

Maurizio CRUDO
Greek Migrations along the Ionian Coast (Southern Italy)

Anna RAUDINO
Variation in Material Culture: Adoption of Greek Ceramics in an Indigenous Sicilian Site (8th century BC)

Maria ÁLVAREZ-FOLGADO
The Jewish Diaspora in the Roman Empire. Diaspora, Social Agents and Social Networks: Towards the Creation of a New Analytical Toolkit

Domiziana ROSSI
A Road to Fīrūzābād

Marijn STOLK
Exploring Immigrant Identities: The Link between Portuguese Ceramics and Sephardic Immigrants in 17th Century Amsterdam

Jesùs GARCÍA SANCHEZ
From War Material Culture to Popular Heritage, and Beyond. The PSP “Cancelli di Venosa” as paradigms of Object Biography Theory.

Reviews
A. Falcone & A. D’Eredità (eds.) ARCHEOSOCIAL L’Archeologia Riscrive il Web: Esperienze, Strategie e Buone Pratiche, Rende (CS): Dielle Editore, 2018, 195 pp. Reviewed by Paola DI GIUSEPPANTONIO DI FRANCO
Blood, Faith and Iron: A dynasty of Catholic industrialists in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England by Paul Belford. Paperback; 175x245mm; viii+226 pages; 54 figures (black & white throughout). 490 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690682. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690699. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Ironbridge Gorge is an iconic industrial landscape, presented as the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution and so part of a national narrative of heroic Protestant individualism. However this is not the full story. In fact this industrial landscape was created by an entrepreneurial Catholic dynasty over 200 years before the Iron Bridge was built. This book tells that story for the first time.

Acquiring land at the Dissolution of the Monasteries, the Brooke family invested in coal mining and iron production – and introduced a radical new method of steelmaking which transformed that industry. Drawing together years of painstaking archaeological and historical research, this book looks in detail at the landscape, buildings and industrial installations created by the Brooke dynasty between the Dissolution and the English Civil War. It also explores the broader contexts – religious, economic and political – which shaped their mind-set and their actions. It considers medieval influences on these later developments, and looks at how the Brookes’ Catholicism was reflected in the way they created a new industrial landscape. In so doing it questions traditional narratives of English industrialisation, and calls for a more sophisticated understanding of this period by historical archaeologists.

About the Author PAUL BELFORD is an archaeologist. Currently the Director of the Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust, he was for ten years Head of Archaeology at the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust. His main interests include early industrialisation, urban archaeology, the archaeology of earthwork monuments, and public engagement with archaeology and cultural heritage. A Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, Dr Belford is also a Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists.
Roots of Nationhood: The Archaeology and History of Scotland edited by Louisa Campbell, Dene Wright, Nicola A. Hall. Paperback; 175x245mm; ii+210 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 7 plates in colour. 478 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919825. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919832. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In a break away from the traditional mono-disciplinary scope of academic enquiry, this volume sets forth a challenge for practitioners within, and outwith archaeology to develop multi-disciplinary approaches in the study of identity in general and aspects in the formation of national identity in particular. The entanglement of identity and nationhood is explored from the prehistory of northern Britain; the establishment of a proto-Scottish identity in the early Middle Ages; facets of Scottish identity at home and in the wider diaspora of Empire; and the more recent heralding of Scottish identity as a multiethnic construction. Set against the backdrop of a groundswell change in the Scottish political landscape and the unprecedented, and largely unexpected, energised and proactive politicisation of the Scottish electorate in the lead up to and aftermath of the 2014 Independence Referendum, the volume is a timely and relevant contribution to discussions of national identities. By bringing together specialists covering a wide array of time periods and subject specialisms, we transcend the concept of identity. This is achieved by exploring the links of nationhood and Scottish identity in the early 20th and 21st Centuries in the ongoing quest for independence demonstrating the political manipulation of history, imagery and mythology entangled in political propaganda.

About the Editors
LOUISA CAMPBELL MA PhD FSA Scot is a graduate of the University of Glasgow. She a Roman ceramic specialist and her main research interests are threefold: material culture, the Roman and Provincial interface with a particular focus on frontier contexts and theoretical approaches to the study of culture contact. She has recently undertaken a Postdoctoral Fellowship supported by Historic Environment Scotland to develop innovative methodologies and technologies for the non-destructive in situ analysis of museum collections. This project, entitled Paints and Pigments in the Past (PPIP), resulted in the identification and reconstruction of pigments originally applied to Roman monumental sculptures from the Antonine Wall and Hadrian’s Wall.

DENE WRIGHT MA MLitt PhD FSA Scot is a graduate of the University of Glasgow. Dene is a lithic specialist and his principal research interest is the Mesolithic. His research centres on the Mesolithic of Scotland with a particular focus on west central Scotland. The structure of his research develops and incorporates Deleuzian theoretical approaches to the concepts of repetition, difference and becoming, identity and group identities as philosophical constructs in Archaeology, the symmetry of lithic technology and technological choices, symmetrical approaches to the chaîne opératoire and lithic analysis and the construct of time as a relational multiplicity of dimensions in co-existence. A research associate at Glasgow funded by Historic Environment Scotland, with Kenneth Brophy he is currently writing up for publication the excavations for Phase II (2012-17) of the Strathearn Environs & Royal Forteviot ‘SERF’ Project.

NICOLA A. HALL MA MLitt is a Senior Heritage Management Officer at Historic Environment Scotland. She is an Archaeology graduate of the University of Glasgow with a particular interest on ritual practice in the Neolithic/Early Bronze Age of Western Scotland. Her research incorporates archaeological theory, landscape archaeology, gender, ritual practice and seasonality.
Barrow Old Hall and Twiss Green Investigations of two sub-manorial estate centres within the townships of Bold and Culcheth in the Hundred of Warrington 1982-87 by Dan Garner, Jennifer Lewis and David Freke, edited by Jill Collens. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+108 pages; 93 illustrations (30 plates in colour). 473 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919689. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919696. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Excavations were carried out at the moated sites of Barrow Old Hall and Twiss Green, in Warrington, North West England, in the 1980s. Sub-manorial estates were established at these two sites by the fourteenth century, located near the boundaries of their multi-moated townships. Townships with multiple moats were a feature of parts of North West England and may have been the result of medieval assarting and the expansion of agriculture on to fringe or marginal areas, on the boundaries of earlier manors. It also owed much to the unusual tenurial arrangements of the region, whereby lords granted small estates out of their holdings, often to family members, to construct moated homesteads.

This report presents the results of the excavations at these two small moated sites, including evidence for possible aisled halls at both sites, as well as a significant assemblage of medieval and early post-medieval pottery. There is also a full account of the finding of the remains of a timber bridge at Twiss Green and its full reconstruction; an illustration of which was previously published in the Shire Archaeology series book on Moated Sites in 1985.

The publication of these excavations contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of the role and development of moated sites in this part of North West England and completes the outstanding analysis of moated sites excavated in the Warrington area.
The Palace Lady’s Summerhouse and other inside stories from a vanishing Turkey by Patricia Daunt. Hardback with Dust Jacket; 210x260mm; 304 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. 5 2017. ISBN 9780995756601. £25.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

From Istanbul's palatial old embassies to its glorious Bosphorus summerhouses, from Ottoman Paris to Ankara's Art Deco, from rainforest mansions to a mad mosque in the mountains... a diplomat's wife reveals their secret histories. This book brings together essays by Patricia Daunt written over the past 25 years for Cornucopia Magazine. It concludes with her latest article, on the magnificent ruins of Aphrodisias, newly listed as a World Heritage Site but long one of her greatest loves. The images are by internationally renowned photographers, including Fritz von der Schulenburg, Simon Upton, Cemal Emden and Jean-Marie del Moral. Foreword by John Julius Norwich.

About the Author
Patricia Daunt is a writer, married to a former ambassador to Turkey, Sir Timothy Daunt; they first met when both were stationed at the British Embassy in Ankara in 1960. Over the past sixty years she has travelled widely in Turkey, often on horse or foot, acquiring a deep knowledge of its history and civilizations. She has introduced parties of enthusiasts to Turkey's archaeological and architectural treasures, as well as its indigenous plants and trees. But her abiding interest remains the ancient city of Aphrodisias. Since 1993, she has been chairman of the Friends of Aphrodisias Trust, a British charity that supports archaeological projects at the site, in the southwest of Turkey.

Reviews
".a record of her expertise and enthusiasms, whose coffee-table dimensions belie its scholarly contents."--Yasmine Seale (Times Literary Supplement) (03/01/2018)

"[This is] much more than a beautifully illustrated book: it's about the people who lived - and live - in these buildings... a love letter to a country and to a world that has been almost completely swallowed up by tourism, new money and development.""--Owen Matthews (The Spectator) (12/01/2017)

Table of Contents
Foreword

PALACES OF DIPLOMACY
1 The Winter Palaces The Pera Embassies

WINDOW ON THE BOSPHORUS
2 Boating with Billy
3 The Summer Palaces: The Bosphorus Embassies
4 The Jewel Box: The Çürüksulu Mehmet Pasha Yalı
5 The Vizier’s Retreat: The Kıbrıslı Yalı
6 A Room for the Books: Ahmed Vefik Pasha’s Library
7 Water’s Edge: The Hekimbaşı Yalı
8 The Talk of the Bosphorus: The Zeki Pasha Yalı
9 Some Enchanted Evenings: The Ratip Efendi Yalı
10 The House that Came out of the Blue: The Germen Yalı
11 In the Spirit’s Wake: Sumahan on the Water
12 The Palace Lady’s Summerhouse: The Ethem Pertev Yalı

TRAVELS IN ANATOLIA
13 The Country Houses that Ride the Storm
14 The Lake that Time Forgot
15 Sublime Portals The Great Mosque and Hospital of Divriği

SECRET ANKARA
16 A Brave New World The Embassies’ Big Move to Ankara
17 Fly in the Face of Fashion Ankara’s Hidden Assets

PARIS A LA TURQUE
18 Treasures of a Lost Dynasty
19 From Lunacy to Diplomacy 276

APHRODISIAS REBORN
20 City of Aphrodite

Acknowledgements and glossary
Index
Une archéologie des provinces septentrionales du royaume Kongo edited by Bernard Clist, Pierre de Maret and Koen Bostoen. Paperback; 205x290mm; 500pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (approx. 205 plates in colour). French text throughout. 465 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919726. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919733. Book contents pageDownload

Of all the great kingdoms that flourished in Africa, the Kongo is one of the most famous. It remains an important historical and cultural reference for Africans and their diaspora. The KongoKing inter-university project (2012-2016), funded by the European Research Council, aimed, through an interdisciplinary approach, to understand the origin of the kingdom and to shed light on the phenomena of political centralization, economic integration and linguistic evolution that took place there. This book presents in detail the results of archaeological research carried out by the KongoKing project in the former northern provinces of the Kongo Kingdom, currently located in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

French Description: De tous les grands royaumes qui fleurirent en Afrique, le royaume Kongo est l’un des plus célèbres. Il reste une référence historique et culturelle importante pour les Africains et leur diaspora. Entraînés très tôt dans le commerce de traite, les esclaves originaires de la région font que du Brésil à New York, en passant par les Caraïbes, la culture Kongo a laissé de nombreuses traces.

Le projet interuniversitaire KongoKing (2012-2016), financé par le Conseil Européen de la Recherche a été coordonné par Koen Bostoen, tandis que Bernard Clist et Pierre de Maret en ont dirigé le volet archéologique. Ce projet visait par une approche interdisciplinaire à comprendre l’origine du royaume et à éclairer les phénomènes de la centralisation politique, d’intégration économique et d’évolution linguistique qui s’y sont déroulés .

Cet ouvrage présente de façon détaillée les résultats des recherches archéologiques menées par le projet KongoKing dans les anciennes provinces septentrionales du royaume Kongo, situées actuellement en République Démocratique du Congo. Dans une première partie on présente le contexte général, l’évolution du milieu, l’histoire du groupe linguistique kikongo et ce que l'on sait des périodes qui précèdent le royaume, ainsi que des informations récoltées dans diverses sources historiques sur ces provinces. Les prospections et fouilles des différents sites étudiés sont ensuite présentées. Puis vient le bilan des recherches archéologiques avec une synthèse des datations, une esquisse de la séquence chrono-culturelle de la poterie kongo et les études systématiques des différents types de vestiges récoltés. Pour conclure, on présente la synthèse de l'ensemble de ces découvertes et la façon dont celles-ci viennent compléter les données issues des autres disciplines pour éclairer d'un jour nouveau l'histoire du royaume Kongo.

BERNARD CLIST est actuellement professeur invité de l’Université de Gand (UGent). Il est archéologue depuis 38 ans, spécialiste de l’Afrique centrale où il a dirigé des projets de recherches notamment en Angola, Cameroun, Gabon et Guinée-Equatoriale. Entre 1985 et 1995 il a été le responsable du Département d’Archéologie du CICIBA au Gabon qu’il a créé. Il a aussi réalisé de nombreuses Etudes d’Impact Environnemental pour des sociétés américaines, britanniques, françaises au Gabon et en Zambie. Pendant toutes ces années, il a publié ou co-publié plus de 130 articles et 8 ouvrages. Entre 2015 et 2016, il a contribué à la version finale du dossier de classement par l’UNESCO du centre historique de Mbanza Kongo au Patrimoine Mondial de l’Humanité, chose acquise en juillet 2017.

PIERRE DE MARET est professeur d’anthropologie et d’archéologie à l’Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) dont il a été le recteur, et Honorary professor à l’University College de Londres. Il poursuit depuis plus de 45 ans des recherches sur le terrain en Afrique centrale et est l’auteur de nombreuses publications sur l’histoire précoloniale, l’anthropologie économique et appliquée, et la gestion culturelle. Membre de l’Académie Royale de Belgique, il est aussi président du conseil scientifique du Musée Royal de l’Afrique Centrale (MRAC)
Stamboul Ghosts: A Stroll Through Bohemian Istanbul by John Freely; Introduction by Andrew Finkel; Postscript by Maureen Freely; Illustrations by Ara Güler. Hardback; 165x225mm; 144 pages; 38 illustrations. 4 2018. ISBN 9780956594884. £16.95 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Irish-American physicist, academic and traveller John Freely wrote more than sixty lively books on travel, history and science before he died in 2017, aged 90. But It was Istanbul, where he emigrated with his family in 1960 to take up a post teaching physics at the American Robert College, that turned him into a writer. His first book, 'Strolling Through Istanbul' – written with his fellow academic Hilary Sumner-Boyd – was an instant success when it was published in 1972 and has never been out of print since.

With the exception of Oğuz, so thin that he was known as The Ghost because he barely cast a shadow, everyone in John Freely's rumbustious memoir, including the author himself, is larger than life. Bohemian Istanbul was a haven for myriad misfits who found their feet in the city. Clamorous, glamorous, eccentric, cosmopolitan and frequently outrageous, they included the 'berserker' Peter Pfeiffer, a resourceful exile with three passports; Aliye Berger, the beautiful queen of bohemian Pera; the writer James Baldwin and, fleetingly, the future Pope John XXIII.

This elegy for a lost world encapsulates the flavour of their daily life and nightly excesses. Well lubricated with lemon vodka and Hill Cocktails served by Sumner-Boyd's gloomy housekeeper, 'Monik Depressive', the Freely crowd weave their way from the Galatasaray fish market and the taverns of Çiçek Pasajı to the Russian restaurant Rejans, and frequently on to the Freely household on the Bosphorus hills, where a party will soon be in full swing and eggnog flowing freely. Stamboul Ghosts is lllustrated with Ara Guler's poignant black-and-white photographs, which make of Freely's beloved city an evocative stage-set.

About the contributors to this volume
Born in Brooklyn, New York, of Irish parents, John Freely (1926–2017) was brought up in New York City and Inch on the Dingle Peninsula in the west of Ireland. A lifelong traveller, he had crossed the Atlantic four times by the time he was six. He enlisted in the US Navy at seventeen in 1944, serving on missions in Burma, India and China, and married Dolores (“Toots”) Stanley after being demobbed in 1947. He received a doctorate in nuclear physics from New York University and did post-doctoral work at All Souls College, Oxford. He moved to Istanbul with his family to take up a teaching post at the American Robert College in 1960 and remained there for most of the rest of his life. Physicist, teacher, and author of more than sixty books of travel, history and science, most famously the seminal guidebook 'Strolling Through Istanbul' (1972), he was a noted raconteur as well as writer, with a prodigious memory for poetry and song as well as facts and dates. He continued writing to the very end of his life: among his last books are three volumes of memoirs, The Art of Exile: A Vagabond Life (2016), The House of Memory: Reflections on Youth and War (2017), and the newly published Stamboul Ghosts (2018).

The author of the foreword to John Freely's Stamboul Ghosts, Andrew Finkel has been based in Turkey since 1989, as correspondent for print and broadcast media including The Times, The Economist, TIME, CNN and the Latitude section of The New York Times. More unusually, he has worked in Turkish-language media – in newsrooms, as a featured columnist and on television. His articles and editorials have appeared in The Washington Post, The Guardian, The Observer and Financial Times, and he has broadcast for the BBC. Finkel is a founder and executive of Platform24 (P24), a Turkish-registered NGO intended to strengthen the integrity of independent media. He was a Journalism Fellow at the University of Michigan and is the author of schola
The Life and Works of W.G. Collingwood A wayward compass in Lakeland by Malcolm Craig. Paperback; 148x210mm; xii+254 pages; 38 figures, 13 plates in colour. 466 2018 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918712. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918729. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The son of a watercolour artist, William Gershom Collingwood (1854-1932) studied at University College, Oxford where he met John Ruskin, whose secretary he later became and with whom he shared a wide range of interests. Collingwood travelled extensively, sketching as he went, and after studying at the Slade School of Art, moved to the Lake District where he wrote extensively about the Lakes, Icelandic sagas and Norse mythology, as well as publishing a biography on Ruskin in 1893. He was an accomplished artist, founding the Lake Artists Society in 1904 and serving as Professor of Fine Art at the University of Reading from 1905-11. His interest in art and Scandinavia prompted his research into the Pre-Norman Crosses of Cumbria and the North of England. In 1927 he published ‘Northumbrian Crosses of the Pre-Norman Age’, illustrated with his own drawings. He was also an accomplished musician, climber, swimmer and walker. His son was the noted archaeologist (a leading authority on Roman Britain), philosopher and historian R. G. Collingwood. This well researched biography provides a comprehensive account of the life and works of a nineteenth century polymath whose story should be better known.

About the Author
Malcolm Craig PhD lives with his wife Margaret in Histon, Cambridgeshire; they have a daughter, Alison and son, Andrew. He began working life as a marine engineer in the Merchant Navy, his voyages taking him to the far east and twice around the world. A keen mountaineer, between voyages he worked in the Alps of Switzerland, Italy and Austria. He became Chief Instructor at Outward Bound schools in Wales and Malaysia before moving back to engineering as a Training Manager in shipbuilding. He joined the Industrial Training Research Unit in Cambridge and completed a PhD in engineering at Cranfield Institute of Technology (now University), where he subsequently lectured, and worked as a Tutor for the Open University in Britain and Russia. He has written seven books, most with mountains as a theme, and became interested in the work of W.G. Collingwood while rock climbing as a young man in the English Lake District.
Softstone: Approaches to the study of chlorite and calcite vessels in the Middle East and Central Asia from prehistory to the present edited by Carl S. Phillips and St John Simpson. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+270 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 461 2018 British Foundation for the Study of Arabia Monographs (formerly Society for Arabian Studies Monographs) 20. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919924. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919931. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Stone containers have been made and used in the Middle East for over eleven millennia where they pre-dated the invention of pottery and were widely traded. The appearance or properties of the stone helped govern how stone vessels were valued or used and many classes were strictly utilitarian, being used for storage, cooking or lighting. Others were decorated and at times they were considered valuable exotica, particularly in regions far removed from their source areas. The subject of stone vessels is attracting growing attention but this is the first attempt to bring together different approaches to the study of softstone vessels, particularly but not exclusively those carved from varieties of chlorite, and covering all periods from prehistory to the present.

About the Editors
CARL S. PHILLIPS works in the Université Paris Ouest, specialises in Arabian archaeology and has excavated extensively in Oman, Yemen and the United Arab Emirates.

ST JOHN SIMPSON is a senior curator in the Department of the Middle East at the British Museum, specialises in the archaeology of the Sasanian and early medieval periods and has excavated extensively in the Middle East and Central Asia.
When Archaeology Meets Communities: Impacting Interactions in Sicily over Two Eras (Messina, 1861-1918) by Antonino Crisà. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+416 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £55.00). 446 . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917913. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917920. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

When Archaeology Meets Communities examines the history of nineteenth-century Sicilian archaeology through the archival documentation for the excavations – official and casual – at Tindari, Lipari and nearby minor sites in the Messina province from Italy’s Unification to the end of the First World War (1861-1918). The area and historical period have been fully neglected by past scholars and need in-depth investigation. The substantial evidence includes sets of approximately six hundred new records and black and white images from Italian and UK archives.

The historical reconstruction, based on analysis of these records, lays the foundations for the entire volume and forms the basis from which the book develops innovative outlines on Sicilian archaeology. The structure follows this central concept. Furthermore, the volume seeks: a) to clarify relationships between the Italian Ministry of Public Education, the Museum of Palermo and local government authorities (‘3-level’ structure of interaction) and to pinpoint contacts with the contemporary social context; b) to compare archaeological research during the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies and the post-Unification period in northern Sicily in terms of methods, history of collecting, antiquities safeguarding and legislation; and c) to contextualise this work in terms of the evolution of archaeology and social change in the wider Italian and European contexts.

About the Author
ANTONINO CRISÀ is an archaeologist, ancient historian and numismatist, and currently research fellow at the University of Warwick, Department of Classics and Ancient History. He studied at the University of Milan (BA 2004, MA 2008) and worked as a ‘Classics Teaching Assistant’ at the University of Leicester (2012-16), where he obtained his PhD in Archaeology (2015). As a field archaeologist, he has excavated in Sicily (Tindari), Sardinia (Nora), northern Italy (Milano, Calvatone, Bagnolo San Vito, Adria, Bergamo, Casale sul Sile) and Syria (Palmyra). His research explores numismatics and the history of archaeology in Sicily between the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries (antiquarianism, coin collectors, nineteenth-century archaeological excavations, archives and museum collection). Dr Crisà has been honoured by the publication of his best numismatic papers within the Italian National Competition for Young Numismatists (Cronaca Numismatica) (2006) and Premio M. Cagiati – XV International Numismatic Congress of Taormina (Accademia Italiana di Studi Numismatici) (2015).
Travellers in Ottoman Lands The Botanical Legacy edited by Ines Aščerić-Todd, Sabina Knees, Janet Starkey and Paul Starkey. Paperback; 160x230mm; xxii+358 pages; 2 maps, 7 tables, 167 figures (139 plates in colour). (Print RRP £60.00). 438 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919153. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919160. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This collection of around twenty papers has its origins in a two-day seminar organised by the Association for the Study of Travel in Egypt and the Near East (ASTENE) in conjunction with the Centre for Middle Eastern Plants at the Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh (RBGE), with additional support from Cornucopia magazine and the Turkish Consulate General, Edinburgh. This multi-disciplinary event formed part of the Ottoman Horizons festival held in Edinburgh in 2017 and attracted a wide range of participants from around the world, including several from Turkey and other parts of the Middle East.

This splendidly illustrated book focuses on the botanical legacy of many parts of the former Ottoman Empire — including present-day Turkey, the Levant, Egypt, the Balkans, and the Arabian Peninsula — as seen and described by travellers both from within and from outside the region. The papers cover a wide variety of subjects, including Ottoman garden design and architecture; the flora of the region, especially bulbs and their cultural significance; literary, pictorial and photographic depictions of the botany and horticulture of the Ottoman lands; floral and related motifs in Ottoman art; culinary and medicinal aspects of the botanical heritage; and efforts related to conservation.

About the Editors
DR INES AŠČERIĆ-TODD is a Teaching Fellow in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Edinburgh. Her research interests include social and cultural history of the Middle East and the Ottoman Empire, Sufism and dervish orders. She is the author of Dervishes and Islam in Bosnia: Sufi Dimensions to the Formation of Bosnian Muslim Society, in the Brill series ‘The Ottoman Empire and its Heritage’ (Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2015).

DR SABINA KNEES has edited the Flora of the Arabian Peninsula and Socotra, since 2005. Before joining The Centre for Middle Eastern Plants (CMEP) at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE) in 2005, Sabina was a principal editor on the European Garden Flora, and a Stanley Smith Research Fellow based at the RBGE. Sabina is a member of the Horticultural Taxonomy Group (Hortax), the IUCN SSC Arabian Plant Specialist Group and the Executive Committee of the Friends of Socotra.

DR JANET STARKEY has edited the Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies since 2007. A former lecturer at Durham University, she has published extensively on travellers in the Middle East. Her most recent book, The Scottish Enlightenment Abroad: the Russells of Braidshaw in Aleppo and on the Coast of Coromandel (Leiden & Boston: Brill), was published in March 2018.

PROFESSOR PAUL STARKEY, a specialist in Arabic literature and culture, is Emeritus Professor at Durham University and is currently Vice-President of the British Society for Middle Eastern Studies (BRISMES) and Chairman of the Banipal Trust for Arab Literature. His translation of The Book of the Sultan’s Seal by Youssef Rakha won the 2015 Saif Ghobash Banipal Prize for Arabic Literary Translation, and his translation of The Shell by Mustafa Khalifa won a Sheikh Hamad Award for Translation and International Understanding in 2017.
Buildings in Society: International Studies in the Historic Era edited by Liz Thomas and Jill Campbell. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+150 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (36 colour plates). 426 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918316. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918323. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Buildings in Society: International Studies in the Historic Era presents a series of papers reflecting the latest approaches to the study of buildings from the historic period. This volume does not examine buildings as architecture, but adopts an archaeological perspective to consider them as artefacts, reflecting the needs of those who commissioned them. Studies have often failed to consider the historical contexts in which the buildings were constructed and how they were subsequently used and interpreted. The papers in this volume situate their interpretation in their social context. Buildings can inform us about past cultures as they are responsive and evolve to meet people’s needs over time.

The buildings examined in this volume range from the twelfth to the twenty-first century and cross continents including case-studies from America, Australia and Europe, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Scandinavia and the Mediterranean. Themes include: Approaches to the study of buildings, Buildings of Power, Buildings in Identity, Domestic Space and Urban and Village Spaces. The essays consider building design, role, and how the buildings were altered as their function changed to coincide with the needs and aspirations of those who owned or used the buildings. This collection of papers emphasizes the need for further international multidisciplinary approaches including archaeology, architectural history and art history in order to understand how ideas, styles, approaches and designs spread over time and space. Together, these papers generate valuable new insights into the study of buildings in the historic period.

About the Editors
LIZ THOMAS is a historical-archaeologist and heritage and cultural researcher based at the School of Natural and Built Environment, The Queen’s University of Belfast. She recently completed her British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship, a multidisciplinary study that focused on the docklands of Belfast, Northern Ireland. She specialises in the study of institutions, in particular won policymaking, political environments and human agency. Thomas’ current research is based on Public Heritage.

JILL CAMPBELL is a skilled buildings archaeologist. She has conducted fieldwork in Northern Ireland, England and Scotland and has produced architectural histories for the Northern Ireland Environment Agency. Dr Campbell has several published papers, and has contributed a chapter on medieval manor houses to the Oxford Handbook of Later Medieval Archaeology.
My dear Miss Ransom: Letters between Caroline Ransom Williams and James Henry Breasted, 1898-1935 edited by Kathleen L. Sheppard. Paperback; 148x210mm; vi+310 pages; 5 black & white plates, 1 colour plate. 399 2018 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917821. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917838. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Caroline Louise Ransom Williams (1872-1952) is remembered as the first American university-trained female Egyptologist, but she is not widely-known in the history of science. Her mentor was James Henry Breasted, well-known as the first American Egyptologist and founder of the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago. As long as they worked together and as much as they depended on each other professionally, Ransom Williams is little more than a footnote in the published history of archaeology. She was a successful scholar, instructor, author, and museum curator. She also had personal struggles with her mother and her husband that affected the choices she could make about her career. This book presents the correspondence between Ransom Williams and Breasted because the letters are crucial in piecing together and allowing an in-depth analysis of her life and career.

The written conversation, comprised of 240 letters between the two, shows that Ransom Williams had a full life and productive career as the first American female Egyptologist. Through these letters, we see part of a life that is unique while at the same time analogous to other professional women in the period. This edition is the first book-length discussion of Ransom Williams’ life and career.

About the Editor DR. KATHLEEN SHEPPARD is Associate Professor in the Department of History and Political Science at Missouri S&T in Rolla, Missouri, USA. She received her PhD in the History of Science from the University of Oklahoma in 2010. Her research focuses on the history of Egyptology in the US and in the UK, and especially women's roles in the discipline. She finds that telling the life stories of women in Egyptology is not only interesting, but it is also crucial to fully understanding the founding and development of the discipline. In her spare time, she is a mom, wife, and Ironman triathlete.
La crisis de octubre. Detrás de la narrativa dominante Trabajos arqueologicos y antropológicos en las antiguas bases de misiles nucleares soviéticos en Cuba by Hakan Karlsson. 160 pages; Spanish text. 20 2017. ISBN 9788416725090. £20.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This book offers a synthesis of the work conducted within the contemporary archaeology project “A world crisis from below” that studied the October Crisis (1962) for over ten years from its material remains in Cuba. A cooperation project between professionals in Sweden and Cuba that focused on the remains of Soviet missile bases and how locals are using them today. An approach from the community that challenges the dominant narratives with low profile voices that actually show how new ways of understanding the Cold War are possible.

SPANISH DESCRIPTION: Este libro presenta al lector una síntesis del trabajo realizado hasta ahora en el proyecto de arqueología contemporánea Una Crisis mundial desde abajo que durante más de una década ha investigado la Crisis de Octubre (1962) y sus restos materiales e inmateriales en Cuba. El proyecto es una cooperación entre arqueólogos suecos y arqueólogos, historiadores y antropólogos cubanos, y desde el inicio el proyecto se ha focalizado en el material que permanece en las antiguas bases de misiles nucleares soviéticos, la reutilización del material desde las bases en el campo y los pueblos que rodean los sitios, los recuerdos y narraciones que sostienen las personas y las comunidades locales sobre la crisis y las bases, y los planes para este patrimonio cultural de los museos locales. Esto para permitir la expresión «voces de bajos perfiles» y los recuerdos y narraciones «de abajo» y contribuir con dimensiones más humanas y complementarias a la crisis y a la «narrativa dominante» de la misma. De esta manera, se pretende llegar a nuevas formas de conocimiento acerca de la Crisis de Octubre. El proyecto muestra que es posible complementar y desafiar la narrativa dominante de la crisis con restos materiales e inmateriales de este campo de batalla de la Guerra Fría.
The Impact of the Fall of Communism on European Heritage Proceedings of the 20th EAA Meeting held in Istanbul 10–14 September 2014 edited by M. Gori and V. Higgins. 132 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white (print edition); full colour throughout (PDF edition). 1 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9788890318948. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 2531-8810-1-2016. Book contents pageDownload

EX NOVO: Journal of Archaeology: Volume 1, 2016

The first issue is concerned with quite a challenging topic, that is “The Impact of the Fall of Communism on European Heritage”: it results from a regular session held at the 2014 Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists in Istanbul. The proceedings are edited by Valerie Higgins (the American University of Rome) and Maja Gori.

Los yacimientos olvidados: registro y musealización de campos de batalla by Mario Ramírez Galán. 434 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (145 colour plates). Spanish text. 39 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917098. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917104. Book contents pageDownload

Los yacimientos olvidados: registro y musealización de campos de batalla is a project that aims to encompass all aspects of battlefield archaeology, in order to be a reference work in this study area. Therefore, a detailed historiographical study about this branch of archaeology has been made, from early origins until the present day, allowing us to gain a deeper understanding of the evolution of battlefield archaeology. Two methodologies, archaeological and museographical, are proposed for the treatment of this particular type of archaeological site. In order to prove the viability of both methodologies, a theoretical application has been carried out in two research examples from different periods, demonstrating both the project’s methodological validity and reinforcing our theories.

Two registers were made regarding battlefields - one historical and another archaeological. The purpose of this was to catalogue all possible existing sites in the interior of the Iberian Peninsula from Roman times through to the Spanish Civil War, which will hopefully serve as a point of reference for future researchers. Through this book, people will be able to understand the great potential of Spanish battlefields and their heritage. Furthermore, Spain could be regarded as a very important country regarding battlefield archaeology.

Spanish Description:
Los yacimientos olvidados: registro y musealización de campos de batalla es un trabajo que recoge todos los aspectos referentes a la arqueología de campos de batalla, con el objetivo de ser una obra de referencia en esta área de estudio. En ella se ha llevado a cabo un estudio historiográfico pormenorizado de esta rama de la arqueología, remontándose hasta los orígenes de la misma, permitiendo comprender su evolución hasta nuestros días. Se han planteado dos propuestas metodológicas, arqueológica y museográfica, para el tratamiento de esta tipología de yacimiento. Para comprobar la viabilidad de ambas metodologías se realizó una aplicación teórica en dos casos de estudio de distinta época, lo que nos permitió ver su validez y reforzar nuestras teorías.

Para esta obra elaboramos dos registros de campos de batalla, uno de tipo histórico y otro de tipo arqueológico, con el objetivo de catalogar todos los posibles yacimientos existentes en interior peninsular desde la época romana hasta la Guerra Civil, sirviendo así de punto de partida para futuros investigadores. A través de este libro se puede comprobar el gran potencial que posee España en campos de batalla y que podría situarse entre los países más destacados.
The History and Archaeology of Cathedral Square Peterborough by Stephen Morris. xii+84 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (38 plates in colour). 356 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916619. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916626. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £29.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Northamptonshire Archaeology, now MOLA Northampton, was commissioned by Opportunity Peterborough (Peterborough City Council) to undertake archaeological work ahead of an improvement scheme centred on Cathedral Square, the historic centre of Peterborough. The construction of two triangular arrays of fountains in the central part of Cathedral Square formed the core of the archaeological investigation, which was undertaken from November 2008 to August 2011.

The archaeological work identified a succession of stone surfaces from the creation of the market square in the 12th century through to the 19th century. The cobbled surface of the original market square was overlaid by an accumulation of dark organic silts, containing finds dating through to the 16th century. At the start of the 15th century the parish church of St John the Baptist was constructed over the western half of the medieval market square with a cemetery immediately to the west of the church. Following the closure of this cemetery by the later 16th century, a small area of floor surfaces were the probable remains of a building, perhaps the Sexton’s house, at the north end of Butchers Row.

On the south side of the market square there were the remains of a rectangular stone building, dated to the late 15th to 17th centuries, perhaps containing shops. Between this building and the church, a raised area of rubble was probably a remnant of the plinth for the recorded market cross. The late 17th century saw the construction of the still extant Guildhall to the east of the church. The raising of the ground level and resurfacing of the square was probably contemporary with the Guildhall. This would have involved the removal of all existing buildings on the south side of the square, as well as the removal of the market cross.

In the late 18th or early 19th centuries the square was again raised and resurfaced, now with pitched limestone. Shallow gutters between the pavement and the road facilitated drainage. A surface of granite sets of the 19th-century survived in a few places below the late 20th-century slab pavement, which has now been replaced by the fountain development.
The Archaeological Activities of James Douglas in Sussex between 1809 and 1819 by Malcolm Lyne. Paperback; 148x210mm; vi+60 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 5 plates in colour. 350 2017 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916480. £15.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916497. £10.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £15.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

James Douglas (1753-1819) was a polymath, well ahead of his time in both the fields of archaeology and earth-sciences. His examinations of fossils from the London Clay and other geological formations caused him to conclude that the Earth was much older than the 4004 BC allotted to it by his contemporaries. He had come to this conclusion by 1785 and published these findings in that year, long before other researchers in the same field. His Nenia Britannica, published in 1793, reveals a remarkably accurate grasp of the dating of Anglo-Saxon burials; further illuminated by the contents of his common-place book for 1814-16, discovered by the author in a second-hand bookshop. This common-place book, correspondence with his contemporaries and other sources resulted in the present publication recounting his archaeological and other activities in Sussex during the first two decades of the 19th century.
Arqueología urbana en el área central de la Ciudad de Córdoba, Argentina Excavaciones en la Sede Corporativa del Banco de la Provincia de Córdoba (2014-2016) by Andrés D. Izeta, Eduardo A. Pautassi, G. Roxana Cattáneo, Andrés I. Robledo, José María Caminoa, Julián Mignino and Isabel E. Prado. 256 pages; illustrated throughout with 119 plates in colour. Spanish text with English abstract. 29 2017 South American Archaeology Series 29. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916084. £54.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916091. Book contents pageDownload

This work is part of a line of action proposed by the Institute of Anthropology of Córdoba (IDACOR), doubly dependent executing unit of the National Council of Scientific and Technical Research (CONICET) and the National University of Cordoba (UNC). This action requires the intervention of professional archaeologists in order to evaluate the impact produced by subsurface excavation in cases related to the development of real estate projects.

Within this framework, in February 2014, there was the need to implement an archeological impact study on land under cadastral nomenclature 04-04-020-023 in the city of Cordoba, Argentina. The study was conducted in two instances. The first took place between the months of April and June 2014, consisting of various actions related to the systematic archaeological excavation, registration, conservation and interpretation of material culture recovered in depths between the surface and about 2.5 / 3m deep. The second stage, implemented between February and August 2015, consisted of the monitoring of the excavation while using heavy machinery allowed archaeologists to reach greater depths. The results of these tasks were submitted to the local authorities in five partial reports presented collectively here in order to have all the information available in one volume.

As a result of the excavations it was possible to retrieve information about land use in the last two hundred years. Previous occupations have been masked or destroyed mostly by architectural interventions in the mid-nineteenth century and early twentieth century. However more than 30,000 objects recovered during the archaeological project help us to interpret the life of the people who inhabited these spaces, as well as local and international production and trade networks where they were integrated.

Along with this, it was possible to recover significant portions of architectural structures that probably correspond to the eighteenth century, being the oldest constructive feature found on the parcel. This action, perhaps the most difficult due to the sheer scale of the objects, allowed the implementation of a novel technique for the recovery of archaeological objects in the city of Córdoba.

Cloth Seals: An Illustrated Guide to the Identification of Lead Seals Attached to Cloth by Stuart F. Elton. iv+410 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 319 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915483. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915490. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

We are very lucky to have small, contemporary records of history scattered throughout our soil in the form of lead seals. With a couple of notable exceptions, they have largely been ignored by archaeologists and historians, but the recent explosion in the numbers found and recorded has helped to bring their importance and potential to the attention of those interested in our heritage.

This book is intended to be a repository of the salient information currently available on the identification of cloth seals, and a source of new material that extends our understanding of these important indicators of post medieval and early modern industry and trade. It is, primarily, a guide to help with the identification of cloth seals, both those found within and those originating from the United Kingdom.

Most of the extra examples, referenced beneath the images, can be quickly located and viewed through access to the internet.

About the author:
After thirty years as a Government scientist, early retirement allowed the author to indulge his hobby of metal detecting. This soon evolved into a passion for recording and researching the lead seals he and his fellow detectorists discovered. After setting up his own web site, which now contains thousands of such seals, he progressed to helping local museums and then the Museum of London with the re-cataloguing of their cloth seals. Over ten years of this experience and world-wide correspondence with other enthusiasts and experts has led to the production of this book.
The Resurgam Submarine ‘A Project for Annoying the Enemy’ by Peter Holt. xiv+118 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 327 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915827. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915834. £15.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

For centuries inventors have been dreaming up schemes to allow people to submerge beneath the waves, stay a while then return again unharmed. The Resurgam was designed for this purpose, as a stealthy underwater weapon which was the brainchild of an eccentric inventor realised in iron, timber, coal and steam. The inventor was George William Garrett, a curate from Manchester who designed and built the Resurgam submarine in 1879 using the limited technology available to a Victorian engineer on a small budget. This is not the story of Garrett himself as this story has already been told, instead this book tells the story how the Resurgam was built, how she may have worked and what happened to her. The book introduces Garrett the inventor then puts the creation of Resurgam in context by considering similar submarines being developed at the end of the 19th century. Garrett’s relationship with the Royal Navy is related here as they were his intended client and the tale continues with a description of how the submarine was built and how it may have worked. The end of the story relates how the Resurgam came to be lost in 1880 pieced together from documents and newspaper reports. Curiously, aspects of the tale do not fit with what was found by underwater archaeologists recording the wreck so other ideas are explored about how and why the submarine was lost.
Coventry’s Medieval Suburbs Excavations at Hill Street, Upper Well Street and Far Gosford Street 2003-2007 by Paul Mason, Danny McAree and Iain Soden. xii+196 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 323 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915629. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915636. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Hill Street, Upper Well Street and Far Gosford Street comprise three suburban streets which stood directly outside the city gates of Coventry for much of the medieval period. As a result of the 2003-2007 excavations an extensive body of archaeological, environmental and documentary evidence has been brought together to allow comparison in terms of land planning, construction methodologies, character and relative fluctuations in the long-term economy of two of the city’s medieval and post-medieval suburbs.

As well as evidence for street frontage occupation, the sites contain substantial portions of the city’s defences, never before looked at in such detail. The new data is of great value in comparing the results with those previously gained from a variety of smaller sites in Coventry and comparable sites elsewhere in the country. The work has, in some detail, married up excavated data and documentary sources for the working of the defences over a period of 250 years. In addition the immediate suburban environment has come under scrutiny and an unprecedented level of botanical data has come to light in a programme of sampling for both seeds and pollens as a guide to the changing character of the suburbs.

At Hill Street, excavation uncovered two medieval and post-medieval frontage properties 50m wide and their rear yards adjacent to the city ditch. While upstanding structural remains were scant, analysis of contemporary pits has highlighted mainly domestic but also some industrial aspects of the properties and given an insight into the diet, economy and changing face of suburban Hill Street from the 13th to 19th centuries. Excavation also uncovered some 55m of the city ditch adjacent to Bond Street, into which four large sections were cut, three close to Hill Street and one at the junction with Upper Well Street. The excavations highlight the huge investment made in digging and maintaining the ditch as a defensive line for the first half of the 15th century before it was gradually misused for fly-tipping and eventually lost beneath a welter of dumping by the later 17th century. It was probably indefensible long before the Civil War. A varied and rich environmental profile of the site has been constructed, which paints a picture of a suburban, semi-rural habitat which was increasingly spoiled in the 16th and 17th centuries by unrestricted dumping of refuse and cess. A wide variety of finds was recovered, indicative of both domestic and industrial occupation and use. This range was dominated by a large group of well-preserved late medieval leather shoes.

The Far Gosford Street excavations revealed evidence for some 800 years of human activity. The earliest remains comprised a solid timber post, possibly related to a bridge over the River Sherbourne, for which tree-ring dating established a felling date of 1162-1212. A frontage was first occupied in the early 14th century when buildings were laid out along the street. A hoard of silver pennies found buried beneath the floor of one of the buildings probably represents the savings of one of the street’s earliest residents. These structures were replaced in the first half of the 15th century, probably at the same time as the city wall was built a short distance to the west. A second medieval frontage lasted until 1643 when it was again dismantled during the Civil War. Entrenchments dating to this period were also excavated. In the 18th century a third frontage was built, replaced in the 19th century and finally demolished to make way for Singer Motors car showroom after they acquired the site in 1926.

(Excavations were carried out primarily by Northamptonshire Archaeology, now MOLA Northampton.)