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NEW: The Archaeological Survey of Sudanese Nubia, 1963-69: The Pharaonic Sites edited by David N. Edwards. Hardback; 205x290mm; 468 pages; 812 figures, 2 tables (16 plates in colour). 652 2020 Sudan Archaeological Research Society Publication 23. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696493. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696509. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Of the Nubian Archaeological Campaigns responding to the construction of the Aswan High Dam, the survey and excavations carried out within Sudanese Nubia represent the most substantial achievement of the larger enterprise. Many components of the larger project of the UNESCO – Sudan Antiquities Service Survey have been published, in addition to the reports of a number of other major projects assigned separate concessions within the region. However, the results of one major element, the Archaeological Survey of Sudanese Nubia (ASSN) between the Second Cataract and the Dal Cataract remain largely unpublished. This volume, focusing on the pharaonic sites, is the first of a series which aims to bring to publication the records of the ASSN. These records represent a major body of data relating to a region largely now lost to flooding. This is also a region of very considerable importance for understanding the archaeology and history of Nubia more generally, not least in relation to the still often poorly understood relationships between Lower Nubia to the north and the surviving areas of Middle and Upper Nubia, to the south.

The ASSN project fieldwork was undertaken over six years between 1963 and 1969, investigating c.130km of the river valley between Gemai, at the south end of the Second Cataract, and Dal.
NEW: EurASEAA14 Volume I: Ancient and Living Traditions Papers from the Fourteenth International Conference of the European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists: Volume I edited by Helen Lewis. Paperback; 203x276mm; 244 pages; 170 figures, 13 tables. (Print RRP: £45.00). 114 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695052. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695069. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

EurASEAA14: Ancient and Living Traditions is the first of two volumes comprising papers originally presented at the EurASEAA14 (European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists) conference in 2012, updated for publication. The aim of the EurASEAA is to facilitate communication between different disciplines, to present current work in the field, and to stimulate future research. This international initiative aims to foster international scholarly cooperation in the field of Southeast Asian archaeology, art history and philology.

This volume focuses substantially on topics under the broad themes of archaeology and art history, epigraphy, philology, historic archaeology, ethnography, ethnoarchaeology, ethnomusicology, materials studies, and long-distance trade and exchange.

About the Editor
Helen Lewis is an associate professor at University College Dublin School of Archaeology. Her research in Southeast Asia has mostly focused on cave sites in Laos, Malaysian Borneo, and the Philippine island of Palawan, where she co-directs the Palawan Island Palaeohistory Research Project. She chaired the EurASEAA14 Conference in Dublin in 2012.

Table of Contents (provisional)
Editorial introduction to EurASEAA14 Volumes 1 and 2 – Helen Lewis ;
Events in the Life of the Buddha: Pagan sculptures in the Hermitage collection and their context in the art of mainland Southeast Asia – Olga Deshpande and Pamela Gutman† ;
A note on two peculiar stone pedestals in the form of atlas dwarfish figures (yakṣas) – Valérie Zaleski ;
Representations of the female in Thai Buddhist manuscript paintings – Jana Igunma ;
Prajñāpāramitā in thirteenth century Java and Sumatra: two sculptures disconnected by textile designs – Lesley S Pullen ;
Islamic calligraphy, re-interpreted by local genius in Javanese mosque ornamentation, Indonesia (fifteenth century CE to present) – Hee Sook Lee-Niinioja ;
Understanding the Champa polity from archaeological and epigraphic evidence – a critical stocktaking – Bishnupriya Basak ;
A tale of two Khmer bronzecasting families, the Chhem and the Khat: how traditional bronzecasting revived in the area around Phnom Penh after the Khmer Rouge (1975-1979), and the expansion and modernization of that tradition in the 1990s: a preliminary report – Jane P. Allison ;
The history and distribution of the free-reed mouth-organ in SE Asia – Roger Blench ;
The ethnoarchaeology of Southeast Asian foragers: resiliency in Ata indigenous knowledge and cultural expression in the pre-Hispanic and Hispanic Philippines – Larissa Smith ;
Megalithic rituals of the Maram tribe of Manipur – Binodini Devi Potshangbam ;
The hidden, unique, bronze battleship from Mt. Dobo, East Flores, Indonesia, assumed to date to the Dong-So’n period – Herwig Zahorka† ;
Kattigara of Claudius Ptolemy and Óc Eo: the issue of trade between the Roman Empire and Funan in the Graeco-Roman written sources – Kasper Hanus and Emilia Smagur ;
Cowries in southwestern China, and trade with India and Myanmar in ancient and modern times – Xiao Minghua ;
The source of the seashells and ivories found in southwest China in the pre-Qin Period – Duan Yu ;
Southeast Asia and the development of advanced sail types across the Indian Ocean – Tom Hoogervorst ;
Mediaeval Fansur: a long-lost harbor in Aceh – Edmund Edwards McKinnon and Nurdin A.R. ;
‘The world turned upside down’: sago-palm processors in northeast India and the origins of Chinese civilization – Roger Blench ;
Bibliography
NEW: The Festivals of Opet, the Valley, and the New Year Their Socio-Religious Functions by Masashi Fukaya. Paperback; 205x290mm; 306 pages; 37 figures, 26 tables. Print RRP: £45.00. 636 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 28. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695953. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695960. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Festivals of Opet, the Valley, and the New Year: Their socio-religious functions compares the religious and social functions of these three Festivals, the first two of which were often regarded by the Egyptians as a pair; the New Year Festival stands out on account of its corpus of surviving material and importance. Until now, detailed study of the New Year Festival has only been carried out with reference to the Greco-Roman period; this study turns its attention to the New Kingdom. The book analyses the broad perspectives that encompass Egyptian religion and cult practices which provided the context not only for worship and prayer, but also for the formation of social identity and responsibility. The festivals are examined in the whole together with their settings in the religious and urban landscapes. The best example is New Kingdom Thebes where large temples and burial sites survive intact today with processional routes connecting some of them. Also presented are the abundant written sources providing deep insight into those feasts celebrated for Amun-Re, the king of the gods. The volume also includes a list of dated records which provides a concordance for the Egyptian calendars.

About the Author
Masashi Fukaya comes from the city Tokai to the south of Nagoya. After studying at the University of Tsukuba he completed his doctoral thesis at the University of Oxford in 2014. He has long focused on religious festivals where the general public would communicate with the god in various forms, and also been extending his interests to women, foreigners, and the socially weak. At present he teaches as a visiting researcher at Aichi Prefectural University, Japan.
NEW: Aristotle’s Μετεωρολογικά: Meteorology Then and Now by Anastasios A. Tsonis and Christos Zerefos. Hardback; 175x245mm; 126pp; 34 figures (17 in colour). 631 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696370. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696387. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Aristotle’s Μετεωρολογικά concentrates on the meteorological aspects of Aristotle’s work published as Meteorologica (Μετεωρολογικά or Meteorology) books A-D, and on how they compare now with our understanding of meteorology and climate change. In other words, how well did Aristotle fair when he tried to explain weather 2,300 years ago when there was only logic, eye observation, and past experience, with only primitive instrumentation and a few personalized measurements? While there are scientific issues behind Aristotle’s writings, this book is written for the non-specialist. The book uses simple examples to present its case, which will be easily followed by general readers.

About the Author
Anastasios Tsonis is an Emeritus Distinguished Professor in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) and an Adjunct Research Scientist at the Hydrologic Research Center in San Diego, CA. His research interests include Chaos theory, Climate dynamics, and Networks. He is the author of more than 135 peer reviewed scientific publications and he has been invited speaker in numerous conferences. He is also the author of nine books.

Christos Zerefos is Head of the Research Centre for Atmospheric Physics and Climatology, Academy of Athens, Professor of Atmospheric Physics at the Universities of Athens and Thessaloniki, and Visiting Professor at the Universities of Boston, Minnesota and Oslo. He is State Representative for Climate Change for Greece. He has published numerous scientific papers and books in the fields of atmospheric physics and climatology.
NEW: Working at Home in the Ancient Near East edited by Juliette Mas and Palmiro Notizia. Paperback; 175x245mm; 124 pages; 30 figures, 4 tables. 628 2020 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 7. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695915. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695922. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Working at Home in the Ancient Near East brings together the papers and discussions from an international workshop organized within the framework of the 10th International Congress on the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East held in Vienna in April 2016. The volume examines the organization, scale, and the socio-economic role played by institutional and non-institutional households, as well as the social use of domestic spaces in Bronze Age Mesopotamia. The invited speakers – archaeologists, philologists, and historians specializing in ancient Mesopotamia – who approached these topics from different perspectives and by analyzing different datasets were encouraged to exchange their views and to discuss methodological concerns and common problems.

This volume includes seven archaeological- and philological-oriented essays focusing on specific sites and archives, from northern Mesopotamia to southern Babylonia. The contributions assembled in the present volume seek to bridge the gap between archaeological records and cuneiform sources, in order to provide a more accurate reconstruction of the Mesopotamian economies during the 3rd and 2nd millennium BC.

About the Editors
Juliette Mas is an archaeologist specializing in Near Eastern pre-classic pottery and domestic architecture. She completed her PhD in 2013 at Lyon 2 University (France) and was awarded a Post-doctoral fellowship (2013-2016) at the University of Liege (Belgium), where she was also a scientific collaborator. She is currently a post-doctoral researcher at the Collège de France (UMR 7192 - PROCLAC). Since 2001, she has been involved in various international archaeological missions in the Near East and has overseen the study and publication of Bronze age pottery collections from Syrian and Iraqi archaeological sites.

Palmiro Notizia is a post-doctoral researcher in Assyriology at the Università di Pisa. Previously, he was a JAE-Doctor fellow at the Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales (CSIC, Madrid) and a postdoctoral researcher at the Università degli Studi di Messina. His research interests focus on the social and economic history of Mesopotamia in the third and second millennia BCE. He has edited and studied unpublished cuneiform documents in the British Museum, the Yale Babylonian Collection, the Harvard Semitic Museum and the Cornell University Cuneiform Collections.
NEW: I templi del Fayyum di epoca tolemaico-romana: tra fonti scritte e contesti archeologici Per una classificazione degli edifici sacri nell’Egitto tolemaico e romano by Ilaria Rossetti. Paperback; 205x290mm; 284 pages; 165 figures, 6 tables. Italian text. RRP: £45.00. 622 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 27. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694956. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694963. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

During the Ptolemaic period, Egyptian temples were divided into three ranks: first, second and third class. There was no trace of this classification of sacred buildings in the papyri of the Roman period when only the most important temples were classified by the epithet logima hiera. This work aims to understand the rules according to which Egyptian sacred buildings were classified and how these first, second and third-class temples were planned and arranged.

To do this, an integrated analysis of different kinds of sources was carried out: all the Graeco-Roman papyri and the inscriptions, which contain rank epithets, were examined and different archaeological data about the temples of the Fayyum region were investigated. Based on these sources, it was possible to put forward different hypotheses on the administration and architectural aspects of these sacred buildings.

About the Author
Ilaria Rossetti is currently an archaeology officer at the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities. She obtained a Master’s Degree cum laude and a post-graduate degree at the Bologna University in Egyptology. In 2015 she obtained a PhD at Siena University. From 2015-2017 she was junior researcher at Bologna University, where she was involved in numerous archaeological projects. Since 2012, she has been field-director of archaeological Mission at Bakchias coordinated by the two co-directors Prof. Enrico Giorgi (Bologna University) and Prof. Paola Buzi (Sapienza University of Rome).

Italian Description: La documentazione amministrativa di epoca tolemaica testimonia una divisione di tutti i complessi sacri dell’Egitto in primo, secondo e terzo rango. Questa classificazione sembra non aver lasciato traccia nei documenti di epoca romana, quando solo i templi principali sembrano essere considerati e indicati come logima hiera. A tuttora non sono ancora state definite né le ragioni e i criteri secondo cui gli edifici sacri furono suddivisi in classi, né se vi sia stato un riscontro di questa ripartizione nei dati archeologici. Nel I templi del Fayyum in epoca tolemaico-romana: Per una classificazione degli edifici sacri nell’Egitto tolemaico e romano aims si tenterà di rispondere a questi interrogativi mettendo a confronto e integrando dati desumibili sia dai documenti amministrativi sia dai contesti archeologici dei vari complessi templari della regione del Fayyum, alla quale è stata limitata questa seconda categoria di dati.

Ilaria Rossetti è attualmente funzionario archeologo presso il Mibact. Ha ottenuto la laurea con lode e il diploma di scuola di Specializzazione in Archeologia presso l'Università di Bologna. Nel 2015 ha conseguito il dottorato di ricerca presso la Scuola di Dottorato dell'Università di Siena. Dal 2015 al 2017 è stata assegnista di ricerca presso l'Università di Bologna, dove è stata coinvolta in numerosi progetti archeologici, come egittologa, archeologa e topografa. Dal 2012 è field-director della Missione archeologica a Bakchias coordinata dai due co-direttori Prof. Enrico Giorgi (Università di Bologna) e Prof. Paola Buzi (Università di Roma La Sapienza). Dal 2017 al 2018 è stata ricercatrice junior presso la Sapienza Università di Roma per il Progetto ERC -PAThs (P.I .: Paola Buzi), per il quale attualmente collabora. Ha pubblicato una monografia su uno dei templi di Bakchias, vari rapporti di scavo e diversi contributi.
NEW: The Neglected Goat: A New Method to Assess the Role of the Goat in the English Middle Ages by Lenny Salvagno. Paperback; 203x276mm; 888 pages; 744 figures, 351 tables (colour throughout). 113 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696295. £120.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696301. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Distinguishing between the bones of sheep and goats is a notorious challenge in zooarchaeology. Several methods have been proposed to facilitate this task, largely based on macro-morphological traits.

This approach, which is routinely adopted by zooarchaeologists, although still valuable, has also been shown to have limitations: morphological discriminant traits can differ in different sheep/ goat populations and a correct identification is highly dependent upon experience, as well as the availability of appropriate reference collections and the degree to which a researcher is prepared to ‘risk’ an identification.

The Neglected Goat provides a new, more objective and transparent methodology, based on a combination of morphological and biometrical analyses, to distinguish between sheep and goat post cranial bones. Additionally, on the basis of the newly proposed approach, it reassesses the role of the goat in medieval England.

There are several historical and archaeological questions concerning the role of this animal that have so far remained unanswered: why is the goat commonly recorded in the Domesday Book, when it appears to be so scarce in the contemporary archaeological record? Is the goat under-represented in the archaeological record or over-represented in the Domesday Book? Why is this animal, when identified in English medieval animal bone assemblages, almost exclusively represented by horncores?

Through the investigation of a number of English sheep and goat medieval assemblages, this study sheds light on these questions, and suggests that the goat was indeed rarer than the Domesday Book suggests.

About the Author
Lenny Salvagno has an Honours Degree in Cultural Heritage with Archaeology from the University of Parma (Italy) and a PhD in zooarchaeology from the University of Sheffield (UK). At Sheffield, she also completed a two-year Post-Doc (funded by the Gerda Henkel Stiftung) focussing on changes in pig husbandry during the Late Medieval-Early Modern transition in England. She is now an Honorary Research Fellow at the Department of Archaeology in Sheffield and a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Post- Doctoral Fellow at the Institute of Palaeoanatomy, domestication research and veterinary history, at the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich (Germany). Lenny’s main interests are in animal domestication and husbandry intensification, the use of animals in medieval and post-medieval Britain, as well as Bronze and Iron Age Italy, ritual deposits, and the use of statistics and geometric morphometrics in zooarchaeology. She is also passiona oarchaeology and the presentation of this field of study to the general public.
FORTHCOMING: The Later Saxon and Early Norman Manorial Settlement at Guiting Power, Gloucestershire: Archaeological Investigation of a Domesday Book Entry by Alistair Marshall. Paperback; 205x290mm; 124 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. (RRP: £28.00). 658 2020. ISBN 9781789693652. Book contents pageBuy Now

This report outlines investigation of the early manor at Guiting Power, a village in the Cotswolds with Saxon origins, lying in an area with interesting entries in the Domesday Survey of 1086.

Excavation has shown that, during the later Saxon period, a lightly defended compound contained a principal area of habitation, with an adjacent, more open ‘working area’ partly divided by ditched sub-enclosures, perhaps related to subsidiary settlement, or other economic activity. This complex may have formed the main estate-centre for a more extensive land-holding, scattered over the northern Cotswolds, and leased from the king, its last Saxon tenant being one ‘Alwin’, as sheriff of the county a thegn of some standing.

During the major economic and social changes following the Conquest, under a change to Norman lordship, the manorial perimeter was reinforced, and a small apsidal church was constructed within it, now restored as a standing monument. Subsequently, a new complex of manorial buildings was established on a fresh site within the enclosure, the precursor of the present parish church was constructed nearby, with further development of manor and village into the full medieval period.

About the Author
Alistair Marshall has a formal background in archaeology and the natural sciences, general interests in European prehistory, and is currently developing various projects including: application of remote sensing, from broader study of landscapes to detailed interpretation of ritual monuments with related experimental work; structural analysis of megalithic sites, with especial reference to interpretation of axial alignment; investigation of broader aspects of tribal economies during the later Iron Age in Britain and Northwestern Europe.
FORTHCOMING: L’Egitto dei Flavi: Sintesi e prospettive d’indagine alla luce della documentazione papirologica ed epigrafica egiziana by Nikola D. Bellucci and Brunella L. Longo. Paperback; 156x234mm; 184 pages. Italian text.. 654 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 69. ISBN 9781789696738. Book contents pageBuy Now

L’Egitto dei Flavi, providing synthesis and new prospects of investigation, offers an overall review of the various information obtainable from sources from the Roman province of Egypt in the moment of transition from the Julio-Claudian dynasty to the new Flavian dynasty. Within the investigations, an attempt was made to focus on the province of Egypt during the period of Flavian domination with the aim of providing a compendium and a more balanced examination of the technical and economic organization of the country in a historical period that still would seem complex to want to define in its entirety. This operation made it necessary to start from the various documentary sources (papyrus, ostraka, epigraphs and wooden tablets) which bore testimony of the aspects that were intended to be emphasized. The texts examined were therefore carefully selected in the context of the substantial material available.

About the Authors
Nikola D. Bellucci, master's degree in Classical Philology (Th. Papyrology) and master's degree in Archaeology and Cultures of the Ancient World (Th. Egyptology) at the Alma Mater Studiorum - University of Bologna, is today PhD f. and department member of the University of Bern.

Brunella L. Longo, master's degree in Classical Philology (Th. Papyrology) at Alma Mater Studiorum - Università di Bologna, currently teaches classical literature at the Filzi State High School in Rovereto (Italy). She has dealt with scientific popularization (with particular reference to Classical Philology and Ancient History).

Italian Description
L’Egitto dei Flavi, fornendo sintesi e nuove prospettive d’indagine, vuole ritenersi un pratico strumento riguardante le molteplici informazioni ricavabili dalle fonti provenienti dalla provincia romana d’Egitto nel momento di passaggio dalla dinastia giulio-claudia alla nuova dinastia flavia proponendo una revisione d’insieme specie di queste ultime. Nel corso delle indagini si è tentato di mettere a fuoco la provincia d’Egitto durante il periodo di dominazione flavia con l’intento di fornire un compendio e un esame più calibrato dell’organizzazione tecnica ed economica del paese in un periodo storico che ancora parrebbe complesso voler definire nella sua completezza. Tale operazione ha reso necessario partire dalle varie fonti documentarie (papiri, ostraka, epigrafi e tavolette lignee) che portavano testimonianza degli aspetti che si intendeva maggiormente porre in rilievo. I testi esaminati sono pertanto stati attentamente selezionati nel contesto del consistente materiale disponibile.

Nikola D. Bellucci, dottore magistrale in Filologia classica (Th. Papirologia) e dottore magistrale in Archeologia e Culture del Mondo Antico (Th. Egittologia) presso l’Alma Mater Studiorum – Università di Bologna, è oggi PhD f. presso l’Università di Berna. Autore di numerosi articoli scientifici, è anche membro di alcuni tra i maggiori istituti scientifici internazionali d’antichità.

Brunella L. Longo, dottore magistrale in Filologia classica (Th. Papirologia) presso l’Alma Mater Studiorum – Università di Bologna, insegna attualmente Letteratura classica presso il Liceo Filzi di Rovereto. Si occupa inoltre di divulgazione scientifica (specie negli ambiti della Filologia Classica e della Storia Antica).
PRE-ORDER: Human Transgression – Divine Retribution A Study of Religious Transgressions and Punishments in Greek Cultic Regulation and Lydian-Phrygian Propitiatory Inscriptions ('Confession Inscriptions') by Aslak Rostad. Paperback; 175x245; 224 pages. (Print RRP: £32.00). 629 2020. ISBN 9781789695250. Buy Now

This book is forthcoming in Spring/Summer 2020. Click here to download the pre-order form and save 20%

Human Transgression – Divine Retribution analyses pagan concepts of religious transgressions, how they should be regarded and punished, as expressed in Greek cultic regulations from the 5th century BC to the 3rd century AD. Also considered are the so-called propitiatory inscriptions (often referred to as ‘confession inscriptions’) from the 1st to the 3rd century AD Lydia and Phrygia, in light of ‘cultic morality’, an ideal code of behaviour intended to make places, occasions, and worshippers suitable for ritual. This code is on the one hand associated with ‘purity’ (hagneia) and removal of pollution (miasma) caused by deaths, births and sexuality, and on the other with the protection of sacred property. This study seeks to explain the emphasis of divine punishments in the Lydian and Phrygian inscriptions, while rare in most Greek cultic regulations, as part of a continuum within pagan religion rather than as a result of an absolute division between Greek and Oriental religion.

About the Author
Aslak Rostad (born 1972) holds a PhD in Ancient Greek and is Associate Professor of Classics at Norwegian University of Technology and Science (NTNU), Trondheim.

Table of Contents (provisional)

Foreword ;

Part 1. Introduction and Aims of the Study ;
Chapter 1. Introduction ;
Chapter 2. Aims of the study ;

Part 2. The Propitiatory Inscriptions ;
Chapter 3. The Propitiatory Inscriptions and their Religious Context ;
Chapter 4. Earlier Research on the Propitiatory Inscriptions ;

Part 3. Religious Transgressions and Punishments ;
Chapter 5. Greek Cultic Morality ;
Chapter 6. Prohibitions and Punishments in Greek Cultic Regulations ;
Chapter 7. Transgressions in the Propitiatory Inscriptions ;

Part 4. Conclusions ;
Chapter 8. Conclusions ;
Part 5. Appendices, Bibliography and Index Of Citation ;

Appendix A: Cultic Regulations ;
Appendix B: Propitiatory Inscriptions ;
Bibliography ;
Index of Citation
Bridge of Civilizations: The Near East and Europe c. 1100–1300 edited by Peter Edbury, Denys Pringle and Balázs Major. Hardback; 176x250mm; xx+318 pages; 170 figures, 10 maps. (Print RRP £65.00). 576 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693270. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693287. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume brings together 22 of the papers presented at a conference held in Esztergom, Hungary, in May 2018 to coincide with the 800th anniversary of the crusade of King Andrew II of Hungary to the Holy Land in 1217–18. The theme, Bridge of Civilizations, was chosen to highlight aspects of the links and contrasts between Europe and the areas around the eastern Mediterranean that were visited and occupied by western crusaders and settlers in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, giving special attention to the evidence provided by archaeology and material culture, as well as historical sources.

The results of the joint Syrian-Hungarian Archaeological Mission (SHAM) to the Hospitaller castle of Margat (al-Marqab) highlighted in this volume include an up-to-date overview of the structural development of the site from 1187 to 1285, as well as particular studies of the wall paintings, cooking installations and pottery. SHAM’s recent rescue work at Crac des Chevaliers also provides the basis for studies of the water-management system and medieval burials revealed in its courtyard, while other papers examine the masonry marks and surviving evidence of medieval trebuchet damage at both castles. Other papers focus on the medieval castles of Karak (Jordan) and Jubayl (Lebanon), the medieval buildings of Latakia (Syria), the impact of the Crusades on buildings in Cairo, historic bridges in Lebanon, the medieval chapels of Yanouh-Mghayreh and Edde-Jbeil (Lebanon), piscinas in Crusader churches in the East, the images of donors found in medieval Lebanese churches, and the activity of late thirteenth-century Western metal-workers in Cyprus.

Papers focusing more particularly on historical sources include a new edition of a late eleventh- to twelfth-century pilgrimage itinerary from Hungary to the Holy Land, a discussion of two minor military orders in Hungary, and the portrayal of Sultan al-Kāmil in a contemporary western account of the Fifth Crusade.

About the Editors
Peter Edbury is Emeritus Professor of Medieval History in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. He has published widely on the history and institutions of the kingdoms founded by the crusaders in the Near East and has re-edited the legal treatises by John of Ibelin (2003) and Philip of Novara (2009).

Denys Pringle is Emeritus Professor in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. In addition to his four-volume corpus, The Churches of the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem (1993–2009), his recent publications include a volume of translated texts, Pilgrimage to Jerusalem and the Holy Land, 1187–1291 (2012), and a volume of collected studies, Churches, Castles and Landscape in the Frankish East (2013).

Balázs Major is an archaeologist, Arabist and historian by training and holds a PhD from Cardiff University. He is the director of the Institute of Archaeology at Pázmány Péter Catholic University and a lecturer in the Department of Arabic Studies.
Invisible Archaeologies: Hidden aspects of daily life in ancient Egypt and Nubia edited by Loretta Kilroe. Paperback; 203x276mm; ii+128 pages. 100 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693751. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693768. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Invisible Archaeologies: hidden aspects of daily life in ancient Egypt and Nubia brings together eight of the papers presented at a conference held in Oxford in 2017. The theme aimed to bring together international early-career researchers applying novel archaeological and anthropological methods to the ‘overlooked’ in ancient Egypt and Nubia – and included diverse topics such as women, prisoners, entangled communities and funerary displays.

The papers use a range of archaeological and textual material and span from the Predynastic period to the Late Period. By applying methodology used so successfully within the discipline of archaeology over the past 20 years, they offer a different perspective on Egyptological research, and demonstrate how such theoretical models can broaden scholarly understanding of the Nile Valley.

About the Editor
Loretta Kilroe is an Egyptologist who completed her PhD from the University of Oxford in 2019. She specialises in ancient Egyptian and Nubian ceramics and has participated in several excavations in Sudan with the Sudan Archaeological Research Society. She now works as Project Curator: Sudan and Nubia at the British Museum.
Archéologie de la Bible hébraïque Culture scribale et Yahwismes by Christophe Lemardelé. Paperback; 175x245mm; iv+116 pages; 2 colour plates. 553 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692280. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692297. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £29.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Since the Renaissance, the question of how the Bible was written has been much debated. Documentary theory of the end of the 19th century identified "authors" and schools of writing, paving the way so that, a century later, a complex reality emerged, that of scribes modifying texts as they copied them. Thus, “The Bible” no longer appears as a controlled theological and historiographical project but as the empirical arrangement of heterogeneous texts linked together by an evolving religious ideology. While the great overall account of the first books is based on the election and migration of an entire people, the ideological foundations of Yahwism evoke rather a foreign god who, having reached Israelite territory, ultimately gained pre-eminence there.

This monotheistic ideology was above all an exclusivism that was to be reinforced from the time of the kings of Israel and Judah to the Judean revolts against Rome in the first centuries of our era. In our attempt to understand the nature and origin, as well as the evolution, of this specific form of monotheism, which made of a jealous god the only God, we have relied predominantly on the concept of the “two yahwisms”. This theory enables us to understand how a god allied with a people has also been a creative god of the universe and of all humanity.

Après la formidable avancée que fut la théorie documentaire à la fin du xixe siècle, identifiant des « auteurs » et des écoles de rédaction, un siècle plus tard, la théorie a laissé de plus en plus la place à un réel complexe, celui des scribes modifiant les textes à mesure qu’ils les copiaient. « La Bible » n’apparaît plus alors comme étant un projet théologique et historiographique maîtrisé mais comme l’agencement empirique de textes hétérogènes reliés entre eux par une idéologie religieuse évolutive. Si le grand récit d’ensemble des premiers livres se construit sur l’élection et la migration d’un peuple en son entier, les fondements idéologiques du yahwisme font plutôt état d’un dieu étranger qui serait parvenu jusqu’en terre israélite pour, à terme, s’y imposer.

Cette idéologie monothéiste fut surtout un exclusivisme qui se renforça de l’époque des rois d’Israël et de Juda jusqu’aux révoltes judéennes contre Rome aux premiers siècles de notre ère. Pour tenter de saisir la nature et l’origine, ainsi que l’évolution, de cette forme spécifique de monothéisme, qui a fait d’un dieu jaloux le seul Dieu, nous nous sommes appuyé avant tout sur le concept des « deux yahwismes ». Cette théorie permet en effet de comprendre comment un dieu faisant alliance avec un peuple en particulier a pu être également un dieu créateur de l’univers et de l’humanité entière.

About the Author
Christophe Lemardelé has a PhD in religious sciences (2007) and the title of “Élève titulaire de l’École biblique et archéologique française à Jerusalem” (2002-2003). He has directed seminars at the École Pratique des Hautes Études in Paris, from 2011 to 2016, and published Les cheveux du Nazir in 2016, as well as numerous articles in philology, exegesis and the history of religions.

Docteur en Sciences religieuses (2007), élève titulaire de l’École biblique et archéologique française à Jérusalem (2002-2003), l’auteur a été chargé de conférences à l’École pratique des hautes études à Paris, de 2011 à 2016, et a notamment publié Les cheveux du Nazir en 2016, ainsi que de nombreux articles philologiques, d’exégèse et d’histoire des religions. Docteur en Sciences religieuses (2007), élève titulaire de l’École biblique et archéologique française à Jérusalem (2002-2003), l’auteur a été chargé de conférences à l’École pratique des hautes études à Paris, de 2011 à 2016, et a notamment publié Les cheveux du Nazir en 2016, ainsi que de nombreux articles philologiques, d’exégèse et d’histoire des religions.
The Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Text and Archaeology by Justin L. Kelley. Paperback; 175x245mm; 47 figures, 1 table (Black & white throughout). (Print RRP £48.00). 489 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690569. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690576. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, was built by the Byzantine emperor Constantine I to commemorate the Passion of Jesus Christ. Encased within its walls are the archaeological remains of a small piece of ancient Jerusalem ranging in date from the 8th century BC through the 16th century AD, at which time the Turkish Ottoman Empire ushered Jerusalem into the modern period. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre was the subject of extensive archaeological investigation between 1960 and 1981 during its restoration. With the development of non-destructive techniques of archaeological research, investigation within the church has continued, which led to the restoration and conservation of the shrine built over the Tomb of Jesus in 2017. The first part of this monograph focuses on the archaeological record of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, surveying past excavations as well as recent research carried out within the church over the past three decades. The archaeological survey provides historical context for the second part of the book—a collection of primary sources pertinent to the history of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The texts included here range in date from the 1st century AD to the mid-19th century and are presented in their original languages with English translation.

About the Author
JUSTIN L. KELLEY teaches classes in Christian history and biblical studies at Life Pacific College. Justin specializes in the history and culture of the ancient Near East and spent several years as a student in Israel, where he studied biblical historical geography and archaeology at Jerusalem University College and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
Current Research in Egyptology 2018 Proceedings of the Nineteenth Annual Symposium, Czech Institute of Egyptology, Faculty of Arts, Charles University, Prague, 25–28 June 2018 edited by Marie Peterková Hlouchová, Dana Belohoubková, Jirí Honzl, Vera Nováková. Paperback; 203x276mm; x+252 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (104 colour pages). 88 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692143. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692150. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Current Research in Egyptology 2018 is a collection of papers and posters presented at the nineteenth symposium of the prestigious international student conference, held at the Faculty of Arts, Charles University in Prague on 25th–28th June 2018. The Prague conference was attended by more than 100 people from various countries and institutions. The range of topics discussed was wide, covering all periods of ancient Egyptian and Nubian history and various topics concerning their society, religious life, material culture and archaeological excavations. The event also included six keynote lectures by experts from the Czech Institute of Egyptology, the FA CU (Prof. Mgr. Miroslav Bárta, Dr., Doc. PhDr. Hana Vymazalová, Ph.D., Doc. PhDr. Jana Mynářová, Ph.D., Prof. PhDr. Ladislav Bareš, CSc., and PhDr. Filip Coppens, Ph.D.) and the University of Vienna (Ao. Univ.-Prof. Dr. Peter-Christian Jánosi). The Egyptological meeting was enriched with a visit to the Karolinum, historical buildings of Charles University.
The Ancient Egyptian Book of the Moon: Coffin Texts Spells 154–160 by Gyula Priskin. Paperback; 175x245mm; ii+254 pages; 4 tables, 1 figure. 542 2019 Archaeopress Egyptology 22. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691986. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691993. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Ancient Egyptian Book of the Moon proposes that Coffin Texts spells 154–160, recorded at around the beginning of the 2nd millennium BCE, form the oldest composition about the moon in ancient Egypt and, for that matter, in the entire world. The detailed analysis of these spells, based on a new translation, reveals that they provide a chronologically ordered account of the phenomena of a lunar month. It is argued that through a wide variety of mythological allusions, the separate texts – following an introduction which explains the origins of the month (spell 154) – describe the successive stages of the monthly cycle: the period of invisibility (spell 155), waxing (spell 156), events around the full moon (spell 157), waning (spell 158), the arrival of the last crescent at the eastern horizon (spell 159), and again the conjunction of the sun and the moon when a solar eclipse occurs (spell 160). After highlighting the possible lunar connotations of each spell, further chapters in the book investigate the origins of the composition, its different manuscripts preserved on coffins coming from Hermopolis and Asyut, and the survival of the spells in the later mortuary collection known as the Book of Going Forth by Day.

About the Author
GYULA PRISKIN has an MA in English language and literature from the University of Szeged, and started working as a language teacher in the early 1990s. For fifteen years he taught English at the business college in his hometown, Békéscsaba, Hungary. In the 1990s he also became interested in ancient Egypt and has been publishing his research in various journals since 1998. Lately his main focus of enquiry has been on astral myths, especially the role and significance of the moon in ancient Egypt. In 2012 he received an MA in Egyptology from Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, and now holds a PhD in the discipline from the same institution. Since 2016 he has been working as a teaching assistant at the Department of Ancient History, University of Szeged.
Egil’s Saga: Traditional evidence for Brúnanburh compared to Literary, Historic and Archaeological Analyses by John R. Kirby. Paperback; 203x276mm; 58 pages; 12 figures (9 in colour). (Print RRP £22.00). 74 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691092. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691108. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Regarded as the secondary source advocated by some scholars for this battle around Brúnanburh in AD 937, Egil’s Saga Skalla-Grímssonar (collated c. AD 1242-3) becomes problematical when compared with literary, historic and archaeological evidence. Thus, this argument places the saga in a rather awkward position.

In addressing the general veracity of this saga, allegedly ‘written’ by Snorri Sturluson in 1240/1 we must draw a comparison to distinguish reality from fiction. For this article highlights not only the questionable traditions of Egil fighting at Brúnanburh but whether Snorri’s interpretation was motivated by self-interest. More importantly, could other people have gathered together Snorri’s notes and produced Egil’s Saga? Doubts arise as to its authenticity as many scholars have previously expressed the differing literary anomalies within the narrative. Was the saga written by more than one person? Was it embellished by Snorri or others? Where did the Brúnanburh traditions come from? Is it accurate enough to be used as a historic source – a factual reference? The author suggests this approach may identify the incongruities within this saga demonstrating a correct analysis.
Identifying Brúnanburh: ón dyngesmere – the sea of noise by John R. Kirby. Paperback; 203x276mm; 44 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (13 colour plates). 73 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691078. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691085. Download Full PDF   Buy Now

Scholars each have their own rationale as to the ‘site’ of this momentous battle. Their thirst for recognition has created diverse arguments, some flooding the media, others proposing to the point of acrimony that they have this ‘site’. The ‘conundrum’ is whether any identification of the ‘site’ is correct for all, apart from the circumspect, have taken assorted place-names similar to Brúnanburh as their starting point.

The author chose to disregard the place-name approach and look at the topographic references in the manuscript. The first references were maritime then latterly landscape leading to field-names which have a more stable base than the constantly changing place-names. He found inconsistences in various positions held by some scholars to that of historical record about Brúnanburh.

One major stumbling block was the phrase “ón dingesmere” which has created controversy, some scholars totally dismissing it but the ‘sea of noise’ appears to have some scientific foundation. Obviously it had some special significance to the Anglo-Saxon’s and their Christian allies and may well have been a kenning. Importantly, ‘who were these allies?’

The challenge for the author was to unearth the correct locale of these historic events. As an archaeologist he decided to interpret the topographic phrases in the manuscript evidence as material culture. The results were surprising.
Naturvorstellungen im Altertum Schilderungen und Darstellungen von Natur im Alten Orient und in der griechischen Antike edited by Florian Schimpf, Dominik Berrens, Katharina Hillenbrand, Tim Brandes and Carrie Schidlo. ii+285 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (56 colour plates). German text. 411 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918255. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918262. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Everyone who investigates pre-modern concepts of nature cannot avoid a critical reflection on the ancient understandings of it. Here, “nature” is understood in the sense of a seemingly untouched space, largely independent of human culture. While this concept of “nature” is prevalent in modern times, the reconstruction of ancient ideas is difficult in that concepts of nature, if at all present, emphasize other aspects. For example, the Greek term φύσις in pre-Hellenistic times defines the nature of a thing rather than an untouched environment. A word for “nature” in this sense has not been handed down to us in the remaining texts of the Ancient Near East and Classical Antiquity. Nevertheless, such concepts can certainly be reconstructed from descriptions of nature to be found in literature and the representations of natural elements in art.

The present volume aims at identifying these concepts of nature in texts as well as in archaeological remains of the Ancient Near Eastern and the Greek culture from the Archaic to the Hellenistic period. Contributions from the fields of archaeology and philology are juxtaposed for each time period in chronological order. This arrangement provides a good overview of the concepts of nature prevailing throughout different period and cultures.

GERMAN DESCRIPTION: Der Begriff „Natur“ wird in modernen, mitteleuropäischen Gesellschaften meist im Sinne eines vermeintlich unberührten Raumes verstanden, der weitgehend unbeeinflusst von menschlicher Kultur ist. Für vormoderne Kulturen lassen sich solche Vorstellungen bzw. Konzepte sehr viel schwieriger nachweisen, da beispielsweise ein Wort für „Natur“ mit der eben genannten Bedeutung in den erhaltenen Texten des Alten Orients und der griechischen Antike so nicht überliefert zu sein scheint. Gleichwohl werden durchaus Naturelemente in der antiken Literatur, der Flächenkunst sowie in antiken Monumenten beschrieben bzw. abgebildet sowie als integrative Bestandteile genutzt und funktionalisiert. Daraus lassen sich Konzepte von „Natur“ herausarbeiten und rekonstruieren. Der vorliegende Band möchte solche „Naturkonzepte“ in Texten, Artefakten und Denkmälern des Alten Orients und des griechischen Kulturraumes von der Archaik bis in den Hellenismus identifizieren und einen Überblick über die jeweils in einem bestimmten Zeit- und Kulturraum vorherrschenden Vorstellungen sowie deren diachrone Entwicklung geben.

About the Editors
FLORIAN SCHIMPF studied Classical Archaeology and History at the universities of Frankfurt and Istanbul, whilst gaining practical experiences by participating in excavations in Priene (Turkey), Portugal and on the Balkans. In 2013 he joined the Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature” at the University of Mainz with a project on natural sanctuaries in ancient Greece and Asia Minor. His research interests lie in the fields of religious history, Greek cult practices and metrology.

DOMINIK BERRENS studied Classical Philology and Biology at the University of Freiburg. From 2013-2017 he was part of the Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature” at the University of Mainz, where he received his doctorate with a dissertation on social insects in antiquity in 2016. Since October 2017 he has been a postdoctoral researcher working on the project “NOSCEMUS – Nova Scientia: Early Modern Science and Latin” funded by the European Research Council at the University of Innsbruck. His research interests lie in pre-modern scientific texts and ancient drama.

KATHARINA HILLENBRAND studied Classical Philology and German Studies at the Universities of Würzburg and Frankfurt. In 2014 she joined the Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature” at the University of Mainz with a project on concepts of volcanic phenomena in Roman antiquity. Currently she is working at the department of Classical Philology at the University o
At the Crossroads of Greco-Roman History, Culture, and Religion Papers in Memory of Carin M. C. Green edited by Sinclair W. Bell and Lora L. Holland. Paperback; 175x245mm; xxiv+276 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 3 plates in colour. 468 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690132. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690149. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

At the Crossroads of Greco-Roman History, Culture, and Religion brings together recent research from a range of upcoming and well-established scholars to demonstrate the richness of the cross-cultural exchange of ideas around the ancient Mediterranean along with the reception of and continuing dialogues with these ideas in the medieval and modern worlds. The crossroads theme both honours the memory of our late colleague and friend Carin M. C. Green, who published an important book on the cult of Diana—one of whose aspects was Trivia, the goddess of crossroads—and emphasizes how each encounter of new topic or genre forces the reader to pause and think before proceeding down the new path.

The contents are arranged accordingly under three headings: (1) Greek philosophy, history, and historiography; (2) Latin literature, history, and historiography; and (3) Greco-Roman material culture, religion, and literature. These papers also coincide in myriad ways across the three headings, tracing themes such as friendship, leadership, and the reception of ideas in the arenas of philosophy, historiography, manuscript studies, poetry, medicine, art, and war. Within this delimited framework, the volume’s diversity of topics and approaches to a range of genres in the Greco- Roman world is intended both to appeal to the general scholar with varied interests and to offer students a wide scope through which to consider those genres.

About the Editors
SINCLAIR W. BELL is a classical archaeologist and art historian who teaches at Northern Illinois University. He is the co-editor of ten books, the Associate Editor of Etruscan and Italic Studies, and the author of numerous works on Etruscan and Roman art and archaeology. He is a recipient of fellowships from the American Academy in Rome, the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst, and the George A. and Eliza Gardner Howard Foundation.

LORA L. HOLLAND chairs the department of Classics at the University of North Carolina at Asheville. Her main area of research is the religions of the Roman Republic but she has published on a wide range of topics, including Greek tragedy, Roman comedy, and the history of women in Roman religion. She is a former Blegen Research Fellow at Vassar College, Visiting Fellow in Greek and Roman Religion at the Center for Hellenic Studies, and Visiting Scholar at the American Academy in Rome.
A Bestiary of Monsters in Greek Mythology by Spyros Syropoulos. Paperback; 148x210mm; viii+140 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (21 colour plates). (Print £19.99). 451 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919504. £19.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919511. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £19.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Greek myths abound in images of beauty and perfection: charming gods, attractive goddesses, and handsome heroes, all of them standards of physical and spiritual flawlessness. However, the ancient Greeks were not fond of absolutes. No god or hero is shown without blemishes in character and ethics, and some are even physically imperfect, like Hephaestus, who is ugly and lame. Another element that dominates Greek mythology is the idea of balance. Good and evil, light and darkness, hubris and punishment. What could not be missing from this world is the image of reversed beauty: monstrosity. The aim of this book is to explore the realm of the imaginary world of Greek mythology and present the reader with a categorization of monstrosity, referring to some of the most noted examples in each category.

About the Author
SPYROS SYROPOULOS is an Associate Professor of Ancient Greek Literature at the Dept of Mediterranean Studies of the University of the Aegean in Rhodes. He is the acting Vice-Rector of the University of the Aegean (2014-2018). Since 2006, he teaches Ancient Greek Theater at the Open University of Greece. He is the director of the Masters Course ‘Theater as a social and political institution during antiquity’ at the Department of Mediterranean Studies of the University of the Aegean. He is the founder and editor of the electronic journal ELECTRYONE (http://www.electryone.gr) and since 2017 he is the General Secretary of the Greek delegation at the European University Association.
Perspectives on materiality in ancient Egypt – agency, cultural reproduction and change edited by Érika Maynart, Carolina Velloza and Rennan Lemos. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+110 pages; illustrated throughout with 8 plates in colour. 62 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919337. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919344. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Perspectives on materiality in ancient Egypt – agency, cultural reproduction and change expresses the authors’ broad theoretical interest on materiality and how it helps us to understand the crucial role of material culture in ancient Egyptian society in a more complex way. In the volume, mainly young scholars in Brazil, France, Germany and the UK approach the potential of materiality based on several case studies covering a wide range of topics such as Egyptian art, recent perspectives on sex and gender, hierarchies, and the materiality of textual sources and images.

The idea of gathering young scholars to discuss ‘materiality’ first took place in the form of a colloquium organised in São Paulo, but soon after became a more encompassing project aspiring to produce a publication. The editors’ aimed to include researchers from various places, which makes the volume a materialisation of fruitful collaborations between individuals coming from different scholarly traditions. The combination of different ways of looking at the ancient material culture can hopefully contribute to the renovation of theory and practice in Egyptology. The editors believe that the emphasis on diversity— of background histories, national traditions and mind-sets—is one the main elements that can be used to boost new perspectives in a connected, globalised and hopefully less unequal world.
The Luwians of Western Anatolia Their Neighbours and Predecessors by Fred Woudhuizen. Paperback; 175x245mm; iv+162 pages; 35 illustrations, 11 tables (3 colour plates). 405 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918279. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918286. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £26.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In scholarly literature, there is much attention given to the Hittites and the Mycenaean Greeks, but the Luwians of Western Anatolia are notoriously neglected. Therefore, a study focussing on the latter is desirable. In this book, the presently available information on the western Luwians is assembled. This entails, primarily, the epigraphic evidence in the form of Luwian hieroglyphic inscriptions from the region and the historical information which can be deduced from it, as well as historical Hittite sources. As a prerequisite for the reconstruction of the history of the western Luwians during the Middle and Late Bronze Ages, the thorny question of the geography of their habitat needs to be tackled. This can now be done in an adequate manner owing to the most recent discoveries. Apart from Luwian hieroglyphic, the Luwians of Western Anatolia also used cuneiform script. Based on the linguistic data from both categories of evidence, a sketch of their language is presented. It must be realized, though, that not all inhabitants of Western Anatolia were speakers of the Luwian language. Thus, it will be argued that their northern neighbours in the Troad spoke a different language, of Thraco-Phrygian type. Finally, the Luwians were not autochthonous in the region, but preceded by speakers of a different Indo-European tongue, most adequately defined as Old Indo-European in Hans Krahe’s terms.

About the Author
FRED WOUDHUIZEN, born in 1959, graduated in Mediterranean Pre- and Protohistory at the University of Amsterdam (1985). He earned his PhD in 2006 at Erasmus University, Rotterdam, with a dissertation on ‘The Ethnicity of the Sea Peoples’. As an expert Luwologist, he is well-known for his books and articles on the Luwian dialects of Anatolia and the wider Aegean. Among his books, mention should be made of ‘Luwian Hieroglyphic Monumental Rock and Stone Inscriptions from the Hittite Empire Period’ (2004) and ‘Selected Luwian Hieroglyphic Texts: The Extended Version’ (2011).

Table of Contents
Preface; 1. The Homeland of the Luwians; 2. Geography of Western Anatolia; 3. Origin of the Luwian Hieroglyphic Script; 4. Luwian Hieroglyphic Evidence on the Great Kingdom of Assuwa; 5. Western Anatolia under Hittite Rule; 6. Western Anatolia in the Final Stage of the Bronze Age; 7. Amenhotep III: Historical Background to his Aegean Policy; 8. The Arzawan Language; 9. The Language of the Trojans; 10. Evidence for an Old Indo-European Substrate in Western Anatolia; Bibliography
Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 48 2018 Papers from the fifty-first meeting of the Seminar for Arabian Studies held at the British Museum, London, 4th to 6th August 2017 edited by Julian Jansen van Rensburg, Harry Munt, Tim Power, and Janet Starkey. ISSN 0308-8421. Paperback; 206x255mm; vi+374 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. PSAS48 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918774. £69.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918781. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £69.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Seminar for Arabian Studies has come a long way since 1968 when it was first convened, yet it remains the principal international academic forum for research on the Arabian Peninsula. This is clearly reflected in the ever-increasing number of researchers from all over the world who come each year to the three-day Seminar to present and discuss their latest research and fieldwork.

The Seminar has covered, and continues to cover, an extensive range of diverse subjects that include anthropology, archaeology, architecture, art, epigraphy, ethnography, history, language, linguistics, literature, numismatics, theology, and more, from the earliest times to the present day or, in the fields of political and social history, to around the end of the Ottoman Empire (1922/1923).

Papers presented at the Seminar have all been subjected to an intensive review process before they are accepted for publication in the Proceedings. The rigorous nature of the reviews undertaken by a range of specialists ensures that the highest academic standards are maintained.

A supplementary volume, ‘Languages, scripts and their uses in ancient North Arabia’ edited by M.C.A. Macdonald (ISBN 9781784918996, Archaeopress, 2018), is also available containing the proceedings from the special session held during the seminar on 5 August 2017.
Languages, scripts and their uses in ancient North Arabia Papers from the Special Session of the Seminar for Arabian Studies held on 5 August 2017: Supplement to the Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 48 2018 edited by M.C.A. Macdonald. Paperback; 206x255mm; vi+122 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. PSAS. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918996. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919009. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Seminar for Arabian Studies has come a long way since 1968 when it was first convened, yet it remains the principal international academic forum for research on the Arabian Peninsula. This is clearly reflected in the ever-increasing number of researchers from all over the world who come each year to the three-day Seminar to present and discuss their latest research and fieldwork.

Most of the papers published in this volume were presented at a Special Session of the fifty-first Seminar for Arabian Studies, held at the British Museum on 5 August 2017. Its subject was ‘Languages, scripts, and their uses in ancient North Arabia’ and it was held to celebrate the completion in the previous March of Phase 2 of the ‘Online Corpus of the Inscriptions of Ancient North Arabia’ (OCIANA).
Manual de Egipcio Medio segunda edición by Carlos Gracia Zamacona. xiv+240 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Spanish language throughout. 390 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917616. £14.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917623. £8.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £14.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A second revised and updated edition of Carlos Gracia Zamacona’s Manual de Egipcio Medio [Handbook of Middle Egyptian]. The book is designed as a primer, written in Spanish, to learn Middle Egyptian (2000-1500 BC), which was considered by the Egyptians the ‘classic’ stage of their language, and a guide to read hieroglyphs. The grammatical explanation is accompanied by a full list of hieroglyphic signs (Gardiner’s plus recent refinements), basic vocabulary, gradual exercises (with translation), and a short, updated bibliography. The book’s main aim is didactic, but it also addresses the latest theoretical and methodological issues in Egyptology and Linguistics.

About the Author After studying at the La Sapienza University in Rome with Alessandro Roccati and at the Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest with Ulrich Luft, Carlos Gracia Zamacona was trained as an Egyptologist and linguist at the École Pratique des Hautes Études, at the Sorbonne, Paris, to prepare a Diploma of Advanced Studies (DEA) in comparative grammar under the direction of Pascal Vernus, Professor of Egyptology. Since then, he has carried out individual research, one of them as a postdoctoral fellow at the Institut Français d'Archeologie Oriental, in Cairo, and has collaborated on different international projects, the most recent being the creation of an anthroponym base for the Giza project of Harvard University. He is currently an associate member of the Research Team 4519 Égypte ancienne: archeologie, langue, religion of the École Pratique des Hautes Études, Paris Sciences et Lettres Research University.

Spanish description:
Este libro es circunstancial. Se podrá decir que todos lo son, pero éste me llegó por pura casualidad a raíz de unos cursos de lengua y escritura egipcia organizados por la Asociación de Amigos del Museo Arqueológico Nacional de Madrid en 2007. Mi intención inicial fue la de preparar un material para los participantes de los cursos, siendo consciente de lo difícil que es empezar a leer jeroglíficos y comprender una lengua muy distinta de la nuestra o de las que nos son familiares. Debido a la misma complejidad del egipcio, que en esto no difiere de cualquier otra lengua natural, así como a mi tendencia a acabar lo que empiezo, me encontré un par de meses después de finalizados los cursos con un manual de iniciación al egipcio medio, el estado de la lengua considerado «clásico» por los propios egipcios y en el que están escritos, sobre todo, los textos del llamado Reino o Imperio Medio, que se extendió, de manera aproximada, desde el año 2000 hasta el 1500 antes de Cristo.

Sobre el autor
Tras estudiar en la Universidad La Sapienza de Roma con Alessandro Roccati (egipcio medio e historia de Egipto) y en la Universidad Eötvös Loránd de Budapest con Ulrich Luft (egipcio medio y hierático), Carlos Gracia Zamacona se formó como egiptólogo y lingüista en la École Pratique des Hautes Études, en la Sorbona, París, para preparar un Diploma de Estudios Avanzados (DEA) en gramática comparada bajo la dirección de Pascal Vernus, catedrático de Egiptología. Desde entonces, ha llevado a cabo investigaciones individuales, una de ellas como becario postdoctoral en el Institut Français d’Archéologie Oriental, en El Cairo, y ha colaborado en diferentes proyectos internacionales, el más reciente la creación de una base de antropónimos para el Giza Project de la Universidad de Harvard. Actualmente es miembro asociado del Equipo de Investigación 4519 Égypte ancienne: archéologie, langue, religion de la École Pratique des Hautes Études, Paris Sciences et Lettres Research University.
Huosiland: A Small Country in Carolingian Europe by Carl I. Hammer. viii+250 pages; black & white throughout. 44 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917593. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917609. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Discussed here is the landscape of western Bavaria in the early-medieval period, between about 750 and 850. The title of the study derives from several indications that a noble genealogia, the Huosi, were particularly influential there during the period. Huosiland may be the best documented European landscape of this time. This is due to the extraordinary cartulary or register of deeds prepared for the diocese of Freising by the monk, Cozroh, in the second quarter of the ninth century. The first part of the study (Contexts) describes Cozroh’s codex and Huosiland and then analyzes the main political, ecclesiastical, social and economic structures and features there, based upon the available historical and archaeological evidence. The second part (Connections) explores a selection of particular issues raised by specific documents or related groups of documents from Huosiland. The third part provides all of the voluminous and highly-informative documentary evidence for Huosiland, both from Cozroh’s codex and other sources, complete in full English translation. As a result, the reader is able to construct his or her own Contexts and Connections. A full annotated Bibliography of the relevant secondary literature is included as is a complete Gazetteer of the translated documents. The publication will provide a valuable resource both for advanced teaching and for scholarly research.

About the Author
Carl Hammer graduated from Amherst College (B.A.) and the University of Toronto (Ph.D.). He has also studied and conducted research at the universities of Munich, Chicago and Oxford. After a brief teaching career, he spent the balance of his professional life in international business with Westinghouse Corporation and the former Rail Systems Division of Daimler Benz. He is now retired. He has published four other scholarly monographs on early-medieval Bavaria, two of them with Archaeopress, and numerous articles in North American and European academic journals. He and his wife live in Pittsburgh but spend several months each year in Easthampton, MA, where he has acquired a new research interest in the Puritans of the Connecticut Valley and colonial western Massachusetts.

Alexandria and Qumran: Back to the Beginning by Kenneth Silver. xxvi+586 pages; 42 figures, 11 maps and plans (24 plates in colour). 381 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917289. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917296. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This year, 2017, marks 70 years since the discovery of the famous Dead Sea Scrolls at Khirbet Qumran by the Dead Sea in 1947. The Dead Sea Scrolls are one of the most well-known archaeological discoveries of the 20th century. This book addresses the proto-history and the roots of the Qumran community and of the Dead Sea Scrolls in the light of contemporary scholarship in Alexandria, Egypt. Alexandria, as the centre for Hellenistic Jews and the location of the Library of Alexandria, forms a key to understanding the theme of the book. The relationship of this context to the thoughts of the Essenes, the Jewish philosopher Philo of Alexandria, the Jewish Therapeutae of Egypt living in the neighbourhood of Alexandria and the Pythagoreans are especially studied in this work. Historical sources (both Jewish and Classical authors) and archaeological evidence are taken into account in the wider Graeco-Roman context. The connection between the Jewish Therapeutae in the Lake Mareotis region and the Palestinian Essenes is explained by the ‘Jewish Pythagoras’ based on the idea that the movements share the same philosophical tradition based on Judaism and Pythagoreanism. The prototypes of the Dead Sea Scrolls are explained in their Egyptian context, in association with the Library of Alexandria, the Egyptian temple manuals, and the formation of libraries in the Hellenistic period including that of Qumran.

About the Author:
Dr Kenneth Silver is a historian and professional archaeologist, who has lived and worked for decades in the Near East. He is a specialist in Hellenistic and Roman archaeology, history and numismatics. He has worked with archaeological material in Israel, Egypt, Jordan, Syria and Turkey. He has previously published a number of scientific articles and monographs in this field. His current research interests include the study of early Jewish-Christian relations and the history of early Christianity. Presently he is the director of a survey and mapping project in Northern Mesopotamia studying the border zone between the late Roman/ Byzantine Empire and Persia.
Foreigners and Outside Influences in Medieval Norway edited by Stian Suppersberger Hamre. ii+124 pages; illustrated throughout (14 plates in colour). 368 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917050. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917067. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Foreigners and Outside Influences in Medieval Norway results from an international conference held in Bergen, Norway, in March 2016, entitled ‘Multidisciplinary approaches to improving our understanding of immigration and mobility in pre-modern Scandinavia (1000-1900)’. The articles in this volume discuss different aspects of immigration and foreign influences in medieval Norway, from the viewpoint of different academic disciplines. The book will give the reader an insight into how the population of medieval Norway interacted with the surrounding world, how and by whom it was influenced, and how the population was composed.

About the Editor
Dr Stian Suppersberger Hamre is a biological anthropologist with a BA in palaeoanthropology from the University of New England, Australia, and an MSc in forensic anthropology from Bournemouth University, England. His PhD research at the Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Bergen, Norway, has focussed on different aspects of the medieval population in Norway. From 2013, his main interest has been to improve our understanding of pre-modern immigration, mobility and population composition in Norway, with a special emphasis on bringing different disciplines together to illuminate these topics and to complement his own research as a biological anthropologist.
For the Gods of Girsu (ARABIC EDITION) City-State Formation in Ancient Sumer by Sébastien Rey. 90pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 252 2017. ISBN 9781784916893. £25.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

New Arabic edition for 2017. Download contents page above for full Arabic description. For the English language edition please follow this link.

For the Gods are the opening words or incipit of the first inscribed votive artefacts dedicated to the principal deities of the Sumerian pantheon. They commemorate the construction or renovation of cities, temples, rural sanctuaries, border steles, in sum all the symbolically charged features of archaic states belonging thus metaphorically to supernatural tutelary overlords.

Girsu (present-day Tello) is one of the earliest known cities of the world together with Uruk, Eridu, and Ur, and was considered to be in the 3rd Millennium the sanctuary of the Sumerian heroic god Ningirsu who fought with the demons of the Kur (Mountain) and thus made possible the introduction of irrigation and agriculture in Sumer. Girsu was the sacred metropolis and central pole of a city-state that lay in the Southeasternmost part of the Mesopotamian floodplain.

The pioneering explorations carried out between 1877 and 1933 at Tello and the early decipherment of the Girsu cuneiform tablets were ground-breaking because they revealed the principal catalytic elements of the Sumerian takeoff – that is, a multiplicity and coalescence of major innovations, such as the appearance of a city– countryside continuum, the emergence of literacy, of bronze manufacture, and the development of monumental art and architecture.

Because of the richness of information related in particular to the city’s spatial organization and geographical setting, and thanks to the availability of recently declassified Cold War space imagery and especially the possibility to launch new explorations in Southern Iraq, Girsu stands out as a primary locale for re-analyzing through an interdisciplinary approach combining archaeological and textual evidence the origins of the Sumerian city-state.

About the Author:
Sébastien Rey is Lead archaeologist at the British Museum (Iraq Emergency Heritage Management Training Program) and Codirector of Tello-Girsu (Southern Iraq).