​​ We use cookies to enhance your experience on our site. By continuing to use the site you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy & Cookies.​

 
Archaeopress logo
Archaeopress Publishing Ltd, Summertown Pavilion, 18-24 Middle Way, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7LG, England
tel +44 (0) 1865 311914 fax +44 (0) 1865 512231   email: info@archaeopress.com
Monthly AP Alert - join our mailing list today Archaeopress on Facebook Archaeopress on Twitter Archaeopress on Linked In Archaeopress Blog
Home  
|
  Browse by Subject  
|
  Browse by Series  
|
  Catalogues  
|
  Join Our Mailing List  
|
  Visit Our Blog  
|
  Login (Private Customers)  
|
  Login (Institutional Subscriptions)  
|
  View Basket

Search

title, author, ISBN, keyword

Browse for books in the following languages

ARCHAEOPRESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ACCESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ARCHAEOPRESS JOURNALS
DISTRIBUTED
PUBLISHERS
DIGITAL EDITIONS
OPEN ACCESS PLATFORM
Ordering Information
About Us
Publish With Us
Standing Orders
Trade Sales
Contact Us
Request Review Copy
NEW: The Global Connections of Gandhāran Art Proceedings of the Third International Workshop of the Gandhāra Connections Project, University of Oxford, 18th-19th March, 2019 edited by Wannaporn Rienjang and Peter Stewart. DOI: 10.32028/9781789696950; Paperback; 203x276mm; 276 pages; illustrated throughout. 669 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696950. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696967. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Gandhāran art is often regarded as the epitome of cultural exchange in antiquity. The ancient region of Gandhāra, centred on what is now the northern tip of Pakistan, has been called the ‘crossroads of Asia’. The Buddhist art produced in and around this area in the first few centuries AD exhibits extraordinary connections with other traditions across Asia and as far as the Mediterranean. Since the nineteenth century, the Graeco-Roman associations of Gandhāran art have attracted particular attention. Classically educated soldiers and administrators of that era were astonished by the uncanny resemblance of many works of Gandhāran sculpture to Greek and Roman art made thousands of miles to the west. More than a century later we can recognize that the Gandhāran artists’ appropriation of classical iconography and styles was diverse and extensive, but the explanation of this ‘influence’ remains puzzling and elusive. The Gandhāra Connections project at the University of Oxford’s Classical Art Research Centre was initiated principally to cast new light on this old problem.

This volume is the third set of proceedings of the project’s annual workshop, and the first to address directly the question of cross-cultural influence on and by Gandhāran art. The contributors wrestle with old controversies, particularly the notion that Gandhāran art is a legacy of Hellenistic Greek rule in Central Asia and the growing consensus around the important role of the Roman Empire in shaping it. But they also seek to present a more complex and expansive view of the networks in which Gandhāra was embedded. Adopting a global perspective on the subject, they examine aspects of Gandhāra’s connections both within and beyond South Asia and Central Asia, including the profound influence which Gandhāran art itself had on the development of Buddhist art in China and India.

About the Editors
Wannaporn Rienjang obtained her doctorate in Archaeology from University of Cambridge. She is now Lecturer in Archaeology, Museum and Heritage Studies at the Faculty of Sociology and Anthropology, Thammasat University and a project consultant for the Gandhāra Connections Project at the Classical Art Research Centre, Oxford. Her research focuses on the art and archaeology of Greater Gandhāra, Indian Ocean Trade and ancient working technologies of stone beads and vessels. ;

Peter Stewart is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. He has worked widely in the field of ancient sculpture. His publications include Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008). Much of his research concerns the relationship between Gandhāran a
NEW: A Catalogue of the Sculpture Collection at Wilton House by Peter Stewart with new photography by Guido Petruccioli. Hardback with Dust Jacket; 229x305mm; 438 pages; 14 figures and 154 plates in full colour throughout. 661 2020. ISBN 9781789696554. £90.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Wilton House sculptures constituted one of the largest and most celebrated collections of ancient art in Europe. Originally comprising some 340 works, the collection was formed around the late 1710s and 1720s by Thomas Herbert, the eccentric 8th Earl of Pembroke, who stubbornly ‘re-baptized’ his busts and statues with names of his own choosing. His sources included the famous collection of Cardinal Mazarin, assembled in Paris in the 1640s and 1650s, and recent discoveries on the Via Appia outside Rome. Earl Thomas regarded the sculptures as ancient – some of them among the oldest works of art in existence – but in fact much of the collection is modern and represents the neglected talents of sixteenth-and seventeenth-century artists, restorers and copyists who were inspired by Greek and Roman sculpture.

About half of the original collection remains intact today, adorning the Gothic Cloisters that were built for it two centuries ago. After a long decline, accelerated by the impact of the Second World War, the sculptures have been rehabilitated in recent years. They include masterpieces of Roman and early modern art, which cast fresh light on Graeco-Roman antiquity, the classical tradition, and the history of collecting.

Illustrated with specially commissioned photographs, this catalogue offers the first comprehensive publication of the 8th Earl’s collection, including an inventory of works dispersed from Wilton. It re-presents his personal vision of the collection recorded in contemporary manuscripts. At the same time, it dismantles some of the myths about it which originated with the earl himself, and provides an authoritative archaeological and art-historical analysis of the artefacts.

About the Author
Peter Stewart is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. His research ranges across many aspects of Greek and Roman sculpture and the relationships between different artistic traditions. His previous publications include, Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008).

Guido Petruccioli is an Oxford University-trained classical archaeologist and professional photographer with specialist interests in Roman imperial portraiture and the documentation of ancient sculpture.
A Classical Archaeologist’s Life: The Story so Far An Autobiography by John Boardman. Paperback; 156x234mm; 271 pages; 43 illustrated plates, 28 in colour. (RRP: £25.00). 656 2020 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693430. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693447. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A Classical Archaeologists’s Life: The Story so Far shows that a scholar’s life is not all scholarship, though much of this book is devoted to the writing of books and, especially, travel to classical and other lands. Boardman is a Londoner, born in Ilford and attending school in Essex (Chigwell). His teenage years were spent often in air raid shelters rather than with ‘mates‘ (all evacuated). There are distinctive ‘aunties’, the rituals of daily life in a London suburb. The non-scholarly figures live large in this account of his life, marriage, children, new houses. At Cambridge he learned about classical archaeology as a necessary addition to reading Homer and Demosthenes, even being obliged to recite the latter. And those were the days of Bertrand Russell’s lectures in a university reawakening after the war. Thence to the British School at Athens to learn about excavation (Smyrna, Knossos, later Libya). His return from Greece was to Oxford, not Cambridge, at first in the Ashmolean Museum, then as Reader and Professor. A spell in New York gives an account of the city before the troubles, when Petula Clark’s Down Town was dominant. There is much here to reflect on university life and teaching, and on the reasons for and problems with the writing of his many books (some 40), with reflection on the university, colleges and their ways. Travels are well documented – a notable trip through Pakistan and China, in Persia, Egypt, Turkey – with comment on what he saw and experienced beyond archaeology. A lecture tour in Australia provides comment beyond the academic. He visited Israel often, lecturing and publishing for the Bible Lands Museum. Several tours in the USA took him to most of their museums and universities as well many other sights, from glaciers to alligators.

This book is a mixture of scholarly reminiscence, reflection on family life, travelogue, and critique of classical scholarship (not all archaeological) worldwide, illustrated with pictures of travels, friends, home life, and, for a historian, a reflection on experiences of over 90 years.

About the Author
Sir John Boardman is one of the foremost experts on ancient Greek art. Having served as Assistant Director of the British School at Athens (1952-1955), he was Assistant Keeper at the Ashmolean Museum and later Lincoln Professor of Classical Archaeology and Art at the University of Oxford (1978-1994). He continues to work in Oxford, at the Classical Art Research Centre, where he is mainly preoccupied with the study of ancient gems.

Reviews
'Few who have investigated the world of classical archaeology over the past 60 years can have failed to benefit from consulting John Boardman’s many and varied publications. His central position continues to be paramount, and in this book we have his spirited account of his career, the researches he has carried out, the travels he has undertaken, and the home life and friendships he has enjoyed over the past 90 years.'—Brian A. Sparkes, Classics for All, August 2020
Glazed Brick Decoration in the Ancient Near East edited by Anja Fügert and Helen Gries. Paperback; 205x290mm; 130 pages; 97 figures, 5 tables (61 colour pages). 645 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696059. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696066. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Glazed bricks applied as a new form of colourful and glossy architectural decor first started to appear in the early Iron Age on monumental buildings of the Ancient Near East. It surely impressed the spectators then as it does the museum visitors today. Glazed Brick Decoration in the Ancient Near East comprises the proceedings of a workshop held at the 11th International Congress of the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East (ICAANE) at Munich in April 2018, organised by the editors. Over the last decade excavations have supplied new evidence from glazed bricks that once decorated the facades of the Ancient Near East’s public buildings during the Iron Age (1000–539 BC) and especially significant progress has been achieved from revived work on glazed bricks excavated more than a century ago which today are kept in various museum collections worldwide. Since the latest summarising works on Ancient Near Eastern glazed architectural décors have been published several decades ago and in the meantime considerable insight into the subject has been gained, this volume aims to provide an updated overview of the development of glazed bricks and of the scientific research on the Iron Age glazes. Furthermore, it presents the on-going research on this topic and new insights into glazed bricks from Ashur, Nimrud, Khorsabad, and Babylon.

About the Editors
Anja Fügert received her master’s degree in Near Eastern Archaeology at the Freie Universität Berlin in 2005 with a dissertation on the Old Babylonian palace at Uruk. From 2005 to 2014 she was a staff member of the research project Tell Sheikh Hamad / Syria and in 2013 she defended her PhD on the Neo-Assyrian glyptics from this site. After working as a freelance illustrator in the Egyptian National Museum in Cairo she did a 2-year traineeship at the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin. She also taught courses of Near Eastern Archaeology at the Freie Universität Berlin and at the Georg-August-Universität Göttingen. Since December 2017 she is the head of the editorial office of the Orient-Department of the German Archaeological Institute. Together with Helen Gries, she initiated and directs the project The Reconstruction of the Glazed Brick Facades from Ashur in the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin (GlAssur).

Helen Gries obtained MA in Near Eastern Archaeology at Johannes Gutenberg-Universität of Mainz in 2010. In 2011 she started her PhD as a member of the Graduate School ‘Formen von Prestige in Kulturen des Altertums’ at Ludwig-Maximilians- Universität of Munich. In 2014 she completed her PhD at Munich with a dissertation on the Ashur temple at Ashur. She has undertaken fieldwork in Syria, Iran, Lebanon, and Jordan. In 2014 and 2015 she was postdoc researcher and lecturer at Institute of Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Munich. Since 2015 she is researcher and curator for Mesopotamia at the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin. Together with Anja Fügert, she directs the project The Reconstruction of the Glazed Brick Facades from Ashur in the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin (GlAssur), which is funded by the German Research Foundation since 2018.
Domi militiaeque: Militär- und andere Altertümer Festschrift für Hannsjörg Ubl zum 85. Geburtstag edited by Günther E. Thüry. 150 figures; 4 tables; 4 plates (86 colour pages). Papers in German (3 in English). 644 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 68. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695328. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695335. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is in honour of the Austrian scholar Prof. Dr Hannsjörg Ubl. It contains a tabula gratulatoria, a bibliography and 24 contributions covering a wide range of topics. The focus being Greek and Roman, the volume includes papers about the Langobards, renaissance replicas of classical sculpture, and the archaeology of World War I. The 'classical' papers deal with Greek and Roman art and art looting; dogs in Greek and Roman warfare; Roman looking-glasses; erotic inscriptions of Gaulish spindle whorls; military equipment and dress accessories; Roman military history and the non-military archaeology of Raetia, Noricum and Pannonia.

Günther E. Thüry is a lecturer at the Department of Classical Studies at Salzburg University, specialising in Roman cultural history, archaeobiology, epigraphy and numismatics. His bibliography includes some 300 publications, including books on ancient coinage, Greek and Roman environmental history, Roman diet and Roman eroticism.

German Description
Dem österreichischen Archäologen Prof. Dr. Hannsjörg Ubl ist diese Festschrift gewidmet. Sie umfasst eine tabula gratulatoria, die Bibliographie des Jubilars und 24 Beiträge, die sich mit einem weiten Spektrum von Themen beschäftigen. Während ihr Schwerpunkt auf der griechischrömischen Antike liegt, widmen sich Aufsätze von Michael P. Speidel auch den Langobarden, von Kurt Gschwantler renaissancezeitlichen Nachbildungen griechisch-römischer Skulpturfunde und von Rupert Gietl und Reinfrid Vergeiner der Archäologie des Ersten Weltkriegs. Die Arbeiten zur klassischen Antike behandeln Themen der griechischen und römischen Kunst (Claudia Lang- Auinger, Erwin Pochmarski); den Kunstraub im Altertum (Ernst Künzl); den Einsatz von Hunden im Krieg (Heidelinde Autengruber-Thüry); römische Spiegel (Lawrence Okamura); erotische Inschriften auf gallischen Spinnwirteln (Günther E. Thüry); militärische Ausrüstungs- und Bekleidungsgegenstände (Thomas Fischer, Christian Koepfer, José Remesal Rodríguez, Bernd Steidl, Paula Zsidi); die römische Militärgeschichte (Martin Mosser, Bernhard Palme, Michael A. Speidel, Zsolt Visy, Ekkehard Weber); und die zivile Kultur der Provinzen Rätien, Noricum und Pannonien (Gerald Grabherr, Renate Miglbauer, Beatrix Petznek, Peter Scherrer, Gerhard Waldherr und Magdalena Waser).

Günther E. Thüry ist Lehrbeauftragter am Fachbereich Altertumswissenschaften der Universität Salzburg. Er arbeitet vor allem über Themen der römischen Kulturgeschichte, Archäobiologie, Epigraphik und Numismatik. Zu seinen ca. 300 Veröffentlichungen zählen Bücher über antike Münzkunde, griechische und römische Umweltgeschichte, römische Ernährung und römische Erotik.
Barbaric Splendour: The Use of Image Before and After Rome edited by Toby F. Martin with Wendy Morrison. Paperback; 203x276mm; 152 pages; 38 figures (30 colour pages). 119 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696592. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696608. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Barbaric Splendour: the use of image before and after Rome comprises a collection of essays comparing late Iron Age and Early Medieval art. Though this is an unconventional approach, there are obvious grounds for comparison. Images from both periods revel in complex compositions in which it is hard to distinguish figural elements from geometric patterns. Moreover, in both periods, images rarely stood alone and for their own sake. Instead, they decorated other forms of material culture, particularly items of personal adornment and weaponry. The key comparison, however, is the relationship of these images to those of Rome. Fundamentally, the book asks what making images meant on the fringe of an expanding or contracting empire, particularly as the art from both periods drew heavily from – but radically transformed – imperial imagery.

About the Editors
Toby Martin currently works as a lecturer at Oxford University’s Department for Continuing Education, where he specialises in adult and online education. His research concentrates on theoretical and interpretative aspects of material culture in Early Medieval Europe. Toby has also worked as a field archaeologist and project officer in the commercial archaeological sector and continues to work as a small finds specialist.

Wendy Morrison currently works for the Chilterns Conservation Board managing the NLHF funded Beacons of the Past Hillforts project, the UK’s largest high-res archaeological LiDAR survey. She also is Senior Associate Tutor for Archaeology at the Oxford University Department for Continuing Education. Wendy’s research areas are Prehistoric European Archaeology and Landscape Archaeology. She has over a decade’s excavation experience in Southern Britain, the Channel Islands, and India.
EurASEAA14 Volume I: Ancient and Living Traditions Papers from the Fourteenth International Conference of the European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists: Volume I edited by Helen Lewis. Paperback; 203x276mm; 244 pages; 170 figures, 13 tables. (Print RRP: £45.00). 114 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695052. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695069. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

EurASEAA14: Ancient and Living Traditions is the first of two volumes comprising papers originally presented at the EurASEAA14 (European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists) conference in 2012, updated for publication. The aim of the EurASEAA is to facilitate communication between different disciplines, to present current work in the field, and to stimulate future research. This international initiative aims to foster international scholarly cooperation in the field of Southeast Asian archaeology, art history and philology.

This volume focuses substantially on topics under the broad themes of archaeology and art history, epigraphy, philology, historic archaeology, ethnography, ethnoarchaeology, ethnomusicology, materials studies, and long-distance trade and exchange.

About the Editor
Helen Lewis is an associate professor at University College Dublin School of Archaeology. Her research in Southeast Asia has mostly focused on cave sites in Laos, Malaysian Borneo, and the Philippine island of Palawan, where she co-directs the Palawan Island Palaeohistory Research Project. She chaired the EurASEAA14 Conference in Dublin in 2012.

Table of Contents (provisional)
Editorial introduction to EurASEAA14 Volumes 1 and 2 – Helen Lewis ;
Events in the Life of the Buddha: Pagan sculptures in the Hermitage collection and their context in the art of mainland Southeast Asia – Olga Deshpande and Pamela Gutman† ;
A note on two peculiar stone pedestals in the form of atlas dwarfish figures (yakṣas) – Valérie Zaleski ;
Representations of the female in Thai Buddhist manuscript paintings – Jana Igunma ;
Prajñāpāramitā in thirteenth century Java and Sumatra: two sculptures disconnected by textile designs – Lesley S Pullen ;
Islamic calligraphy, re-interpreted by local genius in Javanese mosque ornamentation, Indonesia (fifteenth century CE to present) – Hee Sook Lee-Niinioja ;
Understanding the Champa polity from archaeological and epigraphic evidence – a critical stocktaking – Bishnupriya Basak ;
A tale of two Khmer bronzecasting families, the Chhem and the Khat: how traditional bronzecasting revived in the area around Phnom Penh after the Khmer Rouge (1975-1979), and the expansion and modernization of that tradition in the 1990s: a preliminary report – Jane P. Allison ;
The history and distribution of the free-reed mouth-organ in SE Asia – Roger Blench ;
The ethnoarchaeology of Southeast Asian foragers: resiliency in Ata indigenous knowledge and cultural expression in the pre-Hispanic and Hispanic Philippines – Larissa Smith ;
Megalithic rituals of the Maram tribe of Manipur – Binodini Devi Potshangbam ;
The hidden, unique, bronze battleship from Mt. Dobo, East Flores, Indonesia, assumed to date to the Dong-So’n period – Herwig Zahorka† ;
Kattigara of Claudius Ptolemy and Óc Eo: the issue of trade between the Roman Empire and Funan in the Graeco-Roman written sources – Kasper Hanus and Emilia Smagur ;
Cowries in southwestern China, and trade with India and Myanmar in ancient and modern times – Xiao Minghua ;
The source of the seashells and ivories found in southwest China in the pre-Qin Period – Duan Yu ;
Southeast Asia and the development of advanced sail types across the Indian Ocean – Tom Hoogervorst ;
Mediaeval Fansur: a long-lost harbor in Aceh – Edmund Edwards McKinnon and Nurdin A.R. ;
‘The world turned upside down’: sago-palm processors in northeast India and the origins of Chinese civilization – Roger Blench ;
Bibliography
Engraved Gems and Propaganda in the Roman Republic and under Augustus by Paweł Gołyźniak. Hardback; 618 pages; fully illustrated catalogue containing 1,015 figures (in colour). 627 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 65. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695397. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695403. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Engraved Gems and Propaganda in the Roman Republic and under Augustus deals with small, but highly captivating and stimulating artwork – engraved gemstones. Although in antiquity intaglios and cameos had multiple applications (seals, jewellery or amulets), the images engraved upon them are snapshots of people's beliefs, ideologies, and everyday occupations. They cast light on the self-advertising and propaganda actions performed by Roman political leaders, especially Octavian/Augustus, their factions and other people engaged in the politics and social life of the past.

Gems can show both general trends (the specific showpieces like State Cameos) as well as the individual and private acts of being involved in politics and social affairs, mainly through a subtle display of political allegiances, since they were objects of strictly personal use. They enable us to analyse and learn about Roman propaganda and various social behaviours from a completely different angle than coins, sculpture or literature.

The miniaturism of ancient gems is in inverse proportion to their cultural significance. This book presents an evolutionary model of the use of engraved gems from self-presentation (3rd-2nd century BC) to personal branding and propaganda purposes in the Roman Republic and under Augustus (until 14 AD). The specific characteristics of engraved gems, their strictly private character and the whole array of devices appearing on them are examined in respect to their potential propagandistic value and usefulness in social life.

The wide scope of this analysis provides a comprehensive picture covering many aspects of Roman propaganda and a critical survey of the overinterpretations of this term in regard to the glyptic art. The aim is the incorporation of this class of archaeological artefacts into the well-established studies of Roman propaganda, as well as the Roman society in general, brought about by discussion of the interconnections with ancient literary sources as well as other categories of Roman art and craftsmanship, notably coins but also sculpture and relief.

About the Author
Paweł Gołyźniak works as a Research Fellow in the Institute of Archaeology, Jagiellonian University in Krakow. His research interests include engraved gems (ancient and neo-classical), Roman Republican and Augustan numismatics, history of antiquarianism, collecting and scholarship as well as 18th century drawings of intaglios and cameos and the legacy of antiquary and connoisseur Philipp von Stosch (1691-1757).

Reviews
'... this volume—splendidly produced at an extraordinarily low price for what it contains (and actually free to download in PDF format)—is a book of enduring worth. Gołyźniak deserves our gratitude for writing one of the best books on Roman gems to have been published for a very long time.'—Dr Martin Henig, The Journal of Gemmology, Volume 37, No. 3, 2020
‘Scènes de Gynécées’ Figured Ostraca from New Kingdom Egypt by Joanne Backhouse. Paperback; 205x290mm; 136 pages; 170 figures approx. (Print RRP: £28.00). 600 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 26. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693454. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693461. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

‘Scènes de Gynécées’ Figured Ostraca from New Kingdom Egypt: Iconography and intent examines images of women and children drawn on ostraca from Deir el-Medina, referred to in previous scholarship as ‘Scènes de Gynécées’. The images depict women with children either sitting on beds in a domestic setting or in outdoor kiosks. The former are likely to show celebrations carried out in the home to mark the birth of a child. This may have included the bringing of gifts, mainly consumables and small household items. It is possible this was recorded in hieratic texts, also on ostraca, described in earlier research as gift-giving lists. The kiosk scenes may have depicted the place women gave birth in or more likely the place of confinement after birth. However, given the dense nature of settlement at Deir el-Medina it is possible these scenes were symbolic evoking the protection of Isis who nurtured Horus in the papyrus thicket of the Delta. In order to understand the purpose and intent of these images, repeat motifs are considered and their similarities to wall paintings within the village are examined. The objects are important as they represent rare examples of regional art, found only at Deir el-Medina. Also, women are the main protagonists in the scenes, which is unusual in Egyptian art as women are generally depicted alongside the male patron of the work, as his wife, daughter or sister. This publication represents the first systematic study of this material and it brings together ostraca from museums worldwide to form a corpus united contextually, thematically and stylistically.

About the Author
Joanne Backhouse completed her PhD at the University of Liverpool in 2016. Her research interests focus on depictions of non-royal women in ancient Egypt, both two and three-dimensional. She teaches in the Continuing Education department at the University of Liverpool and a variety of educational venues in the North West of England, focusing on the material culture of ancient Egypt.
Sources of Han Décor: Foreign Influence on the Han Dynasty Chinese Iconography of Paradise (206 BC-AD 220) by Sophia-Karin Psarras. Paperback; 175x245mm; x+138 pages; 4 maps, 69 figures. 591 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693256. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693263. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Sources of Han Décor: Foreign Influence on the Han Dynasty Chinese Iconography of Paradise (206 BC-AD 220) uses archaeological data to examine the development of Han dynasty Chinese art (206 BC-AD 220), focussing on three major iconographies (the animal master, the tree of life, and animal predation), together with a series of minor motifs (particularly the griffin and several vegetal forms). All of these are combined in what may be considered the most important iconographic creation of the Han: images of paradise. While influence from the Chinese Bronze Age (especially, c. the 14th-3rd centuries BC) on Han art is expected, a surprisingly profound debt to Greece, the Near East, and the steppe is evident not only in the art of the Han era, but in that of the preceding Eastern Zhou (c. 771-221 BC). Initial Eastern Zhou incorporation of this largely-Western influence appears concentrated in chronological parallel to the Orientalization of Greek art (c. the 7th century BC) and the eastern spread of Hellenism (c. the 4th century BC), followed by repeated introduction of foreign motifs during the Han, when these influences were fully integrated into Chinese art.

About the Author
Sophia-Karin Psarras is a specialist of the archaeology and political history of China and the non-Chinese during the Han dynasty (206 BC-AD 220). Much of her work focuses on retracing intercultural exchange through material culture, together with an exploration of how that culture reflects the past. Her work has appeared in journals such as Monumenta Serica, Early China, and Central Asiatic Journal; her research on Han dynasty Chinese archaeology was published in Han Material Culture: An Archaeological Analysis and Vessel Typology (Cambridge University Press, 2015).
Eν Σοφίᾳ μαθητεύσαντες: Essays in Byzantine Material Culture and Society in Honour of Sophia Kalopissi-Verti edited by Charikleia Diamanti and Anastasia Vassiliou. Paperback;205x290mm; 454pp; illustrated throughout (116 pages in colour). 593 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692624. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692631. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

En Sofía mathitéfsantes. Essays in Byzantine Material Culture and Society in Honour of Sophia Kalopissi-Verti contains a collection of thirty studies dedicated to Sophia Kalopissi-Verti by her students which celebrate the multifaceted academic and teaching career of Professor Kalopissi-Verti, Emerita of Byzantine Archaeology at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. The contributions cover a large variety of topics presenting unpublished archaeological material, suggesting new approaches to various aspects of Byzantine archaeology, material culture and art history. Geographically topics span a vast area from Constantinople to South Sinai and from Cyprus and Antiocheia to the Aegean Islands, continental Greece and Italy. Covering the period from the Early Byzantine to the Post-Byzantine period, they are organised in seven thematic sections: Urbanism and Architecture; Painting and Iconography; Stone Carving and Sculpture; Ceramics; Bone, Metal and Textiles; Coinage and Sigillography; Inscriptions, Portraits and Patronage. The broad thematic, chronological and geographic scope of the volume’s essays reflects the wide range of Kalopissi-Verti’s pioneering research and her own interests, to which she introduced her students and with which she inspired them.

About the Editor Charikleia Diamanti obtained a PhD from the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. She is curator of Byzantine Antiquities at the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Cyclades, Hellenic Ministry of Culture, specialising in pottery, settlements and economy of the Late Roman/Early Byzantine period.

Anastasia Vassiliou obtained a PhD from the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. She is curator of Byzantine Antiquities at the Ephorate of Antiquities of Argolis, Hellenic Ministry of Culture, specialising in medieval pottery and aspects of everyday life.
Public Archaeology: Arts of Engagement edited by Howard Williams, Caroline Pudney and Afnan Ezzeldin. Paperback; 203x276mm; xiv+270 pages; 82 figures, 5 tables (101 pages in colour). 99 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693737. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693744. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

How should communities be engaged with archaeological research and how are new projects targeting distinctive groups and deploying innovative methods and media? In particular, how are art/archaeological interactions key to public archaeology today?

This collection provides original perspectives on public archaeology’s current practices and future potentials focusing on art/archaeological media, strategies and subjects. It stems from the 2nd University of Chester Archaeology Student Conference, held on 5 April 2017 at the Grosvenor Museum, Chester: Archaeo-Engage: Engaging Communities in Archaeology.

About the Editors
Howard Williams is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Chester and researches mortuary archaeology, archaeology and memory, the history of archaeology and public archaeology. He regularly writes an academic blog: Archaeodeath.

Caroline Pudney is a Senior Lecturer in Archaeology at the University of Chester with research interests in Iron Age and Roman Britain, material culture, public archaeology and applied archaeology.

Afnan Ezzeldin graduated with a BA (Hons) Archaeology degree in 2017 from the University of Chester. Subsequently, in 2018, she completed the MA Archaeology of Death and Memory from the University of Chester, with a thesis focused on manga mortuary archaeology.
La parure en callaïs du Néolithique européen edited by Guirec Querré, Serge Cassen and Emmanuelle Vigier; preface by Yves Coppens. Hardback; 203x276mm; viii+634 pages; illustrated in full colour throughout. Papers in French and English. (Print RRP £130.00). 568 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692808. £130.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692815. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Callaïs refers to the green stones from which the remarkable ornaments discovered in several Neolithic sites in Western Europe are made. A term used at the beginning of our era by Pliny the Elder and taken up by the first archaeologists of the early 20th century during the first excavations of the large tumuli of the Carnac region (Morbihan), callaïs includes several mineral species, especially variscite and turquoise, both hydrated aluminium phosphates with a green to blue colour. Beads and pendants made of this precious material, combined with other objects such as axes made of alpine jade, fibrolite, amber or jet beads, sometimes from very distant sources, were deposited with the deceased, reflecting their high rank among the first agropastoral societies, or «sacrificed» in the form of deposits. The question of the nature and origin of these Callaïs pearls and pendants has been discussed many times during the last century by mineralogists and prehistorians. Since the first discoveries on this gem, many researches have been carried out both in the field and in the laboratory to elucidate what some had called ‘the mysteries of the callaïs’.

This volume, prefaced by Yves Coppens, Honorary Professor of the Collège de France, brings together the contributions of the best European specialists in callaïs, variscite and turquoise, who spoke at a symposium on this ancient gemstone held in April 2015 in Carnac. The objective of this book is to disclose the results of the latest research relating to these jewels by scanning multiple fields: variscite geology, gemmology, Neolithic but also Roman exploitations, chemical characterization, production of objects and their diffusion, inventory, dating, place of these jewels within agropastoral societies that occupied part of Europe from the 5th to the 3rd millennium.

French Description:
La callaïs désigne les pierres vertes dont sont faites les remarquables parures découvertes dans plusieurs sites néolithiques d’Europe occidentale. Terme utilisé au début de notre ère par Pline l’Ancien et repris par les premiers archéologues du début du XXème siècle lors des premières fouilles des grands tumulus de la région de Carnac (Morbihan), la callaïs regroupe plusieurs espèces minérales, surtout la variscite et la turquoise, tous deux des phosphates d’aluminium hydratés de couleur verte à bleue. Les perles et pendeloques en cette matière précieuse, associées à d’autres objets tels que haches en jade alpin, en fibrolite, perles en ambre ou en jais, provenant de sources parfois très éloignées, étaient déposés auprès des défunts, témoignant de leur haut rang au sein des premières sociétés agropastorales, ou « sacrifiées » sous forme de dépôts. La question de la nature et de l’origine de ces perles et pendeloques en callaïs a été maintes fois abordée durant le siècle dernier par les minéralogistes et les préhistoriens. Depuis les premières découvertes sur cette gemme, de nombreuses recherches ont été menées tant sur le terrain qu’en laboratoire afin d’élucider ce que certains avaient baptisé « les mystères de la callaïs ».

Ce volume, préfacé par Yves Coppens, Professeur honoraire du Collège de France, regroupe les contributions des meilleurs spécialistes européens de la callaïs, variscite et turquoise, qui sont intervenus lors d’un colloque consacré à cette gemme ancienne qui s’est tenu en avril 2015 à Carnac. L’objectif de cet ouvrage est de divulguer le fruit des dernières recherches relatives à ces bijoux en balayant de multiples domaines : géologie de la variscite, gemmologie, exploitations néolithiques mais aussi romaines, caractérisation chimique, production des objets et leur diffusion, inventaire, datation, place de ces bijoux au sein de sociétés agropastorales qui occupaient une partie de l’Europe du 5ème au 3ème millénaire.
Culture and Society at Lullingstone Roman Villa by Caroline K. Mackenzie. Paperback; 205x255 pages; viii+50 pages; 40 figures (colour throughout). 563 . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692907. £14.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692914. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £14.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Culture and Society at Lullingstone Roman Villa paints a picture of what life might have been like for the inhabitants of the villa in the late third and fourth centuries AD. The villa today, in the Darent Valley, Kent, has an unusual amount of well-preserved evidence for its interior decoration and architecture. Seventy years on from the commencement of the excavation of the site, this study draws on the original reports but also embraces innovative approaches to examining the archaeological evidence and sheds new light on our understanding of the villa’s use. For the first time, the site of Lullingstone Roman Villa is surveyed holistically, developing a plausible argument that the inhabitants used domestic space to assert their status and cultural identity.

An exploration of the landscape setting asks whether property location was as important a factor in the time of Roman Britain as it is today and probes the motives of the villa’s architects and their client. Lullingstone’s celebrated mosaics are also investigated from a fresh perspective. Why were these scenes chosen and what impact did they have on various visitors to the villa? Comparison with some contemporary Romano-British villas allows us to assess whether Lullingstone is what we would expect, or whether it is exceptional. Examples from the wider Roman world are also introduced to enquire how Lullingstone’s residents adopted Roman architecture and potentially the social customs which accompanied it.

About the Author
Caroline K. Mackenzie read Classics at Pembroke College, Cambridge. As an undergraduate she gained a place to study for a month at the British School at Athens. After Cambridge, she continued her studies at law school where she was awarded a distinction and then practised as a Private Client solicitor in London for over a decade. Caroline subsequently pursued a teaching career, first as a law lecturer and then as Head of Classics at a preparatory school in Sevenoaks, Kent. In 2018 Caroline was awarded a Master of Arts with distinction in Classical Art and Archaeology at King’s College London.

Caroline’s current work includes private tutoring in Latin and Greek, providing workshops for schools and leading short courses in Classical Art and Archaeology as well as Classical literature. She also teaches on the annual Summer School in Homer at University College London. Caroline writes regularly for Argo, a journal of the Hellenic Society, and various other Classical publications. She has lectured for English Heritage who invited her to deliver a study day including a private tour of Lullingstone Roman Villa. Her website is: www.carolinetutor.co.uk

Reviews
'This book offers a unique interpretation of the Lullingstone Roman Villa in the Darent Valley of Kent, exploring how its inhabitants used space to assert their position in society, as well as their cultural identity. The first section of the book looks at the position of the villa and its ancillary buildings in the wider landscape, focusing on how the hills and views of the river valley might have been used to impress visitors. The second section turns to the interior of the building, particularly the central room and apse, exploring how the position and use of certain mosaics and inscriptions were used to highlight the villa owner's wealth and education, perhaps in an attempt to emulate Roman aristocrats. Richly illustrated with photographs of mosaics and wall-paintings from the villa, as well as reconstruction drawings of how both the interior and exterior may have looked during the Roman period, it takes the reader on an in-depth, but not remote, tour of the villa.' — Kathryn Krakowka, Current Archaeology, November 2019
The Geography of Gandhāran Art Proceedings of the Second International Workshop of the Gandhāra Connections Project, University of Oxford, 22nd-23rd March, 2018 edited by Wannaporn Rienjang and Peter Stewart. DOI: 10.32028/9781789691863. Paperback; 203x276mm; xii+186 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (60 plates in colour). (Print RRP £38.00). 533 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691863. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691870. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Gandhāran art is usually regarded as a single phenomenon – a unified regional artistic tradition or ‘school’. Indeed it has distinctive visual characteristics, materials, and functions, and is characterized by its extensive borrowings from the Graeco-Roman world. Yet this tradition is also highly varied. Even the superficial homogeneity of Gandhāran sculpture, which constitutes the bulk of documented artistic material from this region in the early centuries AD, belies a considerable range of styles, technical approaches, iconographic choices, and levels of artistic skill.

The geographical variations in Gandhāran art have received less attention than they deserve. Many surviving Gandhāran artefacts are unprovenanced and the difficulty of tracing substantial assemblages of sculpture to particular sites has obscured the fine-grained picture of its artistic geography. Well documented modern excavations at particular sites and areas, such as the projects of the Italian Archaeological Mission in the Swat Valley, have demonstrated the value of looking at sculptures in context and considering distinctive aspects of their production, use, and reuse within a specific locality. However, insights of this kind have been harder to gain for other areas, including the Gandhāran heartland of the Peshawar basin. Even where large collections of artworks can be related to individual sites, the exercise of comparing material within and between these places is still at an early stage. The relationship between the Gandhāran artists or ‘workshops’, particular stone sources, and specific sites is still unclear.

Addressing these and other questions, this second volume of the Gandhāra Connections project at Oxford University’s Classical Art Research Centre presents the proceedings of a workshop held in March 2018. Its aim is to pick apart the regional geography of Gandhāran art, presenting new discoveries at particular sites, textual evidence, and the challenges and opportunities of exploring Gandhāra’s artistic geography.

About the Editors
WANNAPORN RIENJANG is Project Assistant of the Gandhāra Connections Project at the Classical Art Research Centre, Oxford. She completed her doctoral degree in Archaeology at the University of Cambridge on Buddhist relic cult in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Before starting her PhD, she worked as a research assistant for the Masson Project at the Department of Coins and Medals, the British Museum. Her research interests include the art and archaeology of Greater Gandhāra, Buddhist studies, and working technologies of stone containers and beads.

PETER STEWART is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. He has worked widely in the field of ancient sculpture. His publications include Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008). Much of his research concerns the relationship between Gandhāran art and Roman sculpture.
Greek Art in Motion Studies in honour of Sir John Boardman on the occasion of his 90th Birthday edited by Rui Morais, Delfim Leão, Diana Rodríguez Pérez with Daniela Ferreira. Paperback; iv+510 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (230 colour plates). 485 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690231. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690248. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £75.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication on Greek Art gathers a large number of studies presented at the International Congress ‘Greek Art in Motion’. Held in honour of Sir John Boardman’s 90th birthday, the congress took place at the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, 3-5 May, 2017.

The volume first presents eight contributions by the keynote speakers who, as friends and students of Sir John, present a debate and a problematisation of Greek Art from the archaeological and historical point of view.

Thereafter, 45 papers are divided into the different themes considered during the congress, all of which have greatly benefited from Sir John's researches throughout his long and distinguished academic career: Sculpture, Architecture, Terracotta and Metal, Greek Pottery, Coins, Greek History and Archaeology, Greeks Overseas, Reception and Collecting, Art and Myth.

About the Editors
RUI MORAIS was born in Porto in 1969 and has a degree in History, variant of Archaeology from the University of Coimbra. He has a Masters in Urban Archaeology, PhD in Archaeology, Technology and Materials from University of Minho. He was Professor at Minho University and is currently an Assistant Professor with Aggregation at the Faculty of Arts, Oporto University. Among his research, he has dedicated special attention to the study of trade in antiquity, with numerous published works, individually or with other national and foreign authors. He is researcher in the Classical and Humanistic Centre at Coimbra University (CECH). He was a consultant of the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation for antiques. He is a member of the Scientific Committee of the IBERIA GRAEGA Project.

DELFIM LEÃO is a Professor at the Institute of Classical Studies and a researcher at the Center for Classical and Humanistic Studies, University of Coimbra. His main areas of interest are ancient history, law and political theory of the Greeks, theatrical pragmatics, and the ancient novel. He also has a strong interest in digital humanities. Among his main recent works are D. F. Leão and P. J. Rhodes, ‘The Laws of Solon. A new Edition, with Introduction, Translation and Commentary’ (London, I. B. Tauris, 2015), and a second revised edition in 2016; D. F. Leão and G. Thür (Hrsg.) ‘Symposion 2015. Vorträge zur griechischen und hellenistischen Rechtsgeschichte’ (Wien, Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2016). Along with Lautaro Roig Lanzillotta, he is the editor of Brill’s ‘Plutarch Studies’.

DIANA RODRÍGUEZ PÉREZ is a Junior Research Fellow at Mougins Museum in Classical Art and Material Culture at Wolfson College, University of Oxford, and was previously the Research Assistant for the Beazley Archive Pottery Database at the Classical Art Research Centre. Before moving to Oxford, she held a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Edinburgh (FECYT). She received a PhD (Doctor Europaea) from the University of León, Spain (The Snake in the Ancient Greek World: Myth, Rite and Image), an MPhil in History of Art from the University of León, and an MPhil in Archaeology and Heritage from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. From 2010 to 2011 she worked as a translator at the European Parliament in Luxemburg, and was a DAAD Fellow at the Institut für klassische Archäologie of the University of Heidelberg from 2008 to 2009. In the summer of 2017 she was Tytus Scholar at the Department of Classical Studies of the University of Cincinnati (US).

DANIELA FERREIRA is currently a PhD student at the Department of Prehistory, Ancient History and Archeology of Complutense University of Madrid, Spain, and a researcher at UI&D CITCEM - Transdisciplinary Research Centre «Culture, Space and Memory», Portugal. She is also a recipient of a FCT (Portuguese national funding agency for science, research and technology) grant since 2015. Daniela holds a Master’s degree in Archaeology from the University of Oporto (Portugal), with a focus
Artistic Practices and Archaeological Research by Dragoş Gheorghiu and Theodor Barth. Paperback; 205x290mm; ii+184 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (79 plates in colour). 524 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691405. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691412. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Artistic Practices and Archaeological Research aims to expand the field of archaeological research with an anthropological understanding of practices which include artistic methods. The project has come about through a collaborative venture between Dragoş Gheorghiu (archaeologist and professional visual artist) and Theodor Barth (anthropologist).

This anthology contains articles from professional archaeologists, artists and designers. The contributions cover a scale ranging from theoretical reflections on pre-existing archaeological finds/documentation, to reflective field-practices where acts of ‘making’ are used to interface with the site. These acts feature a manufacturing range from ceramics, painting, drawing, type-setting and augmented reality (AR). The scope of the anthology – as a book or edited whole – has accordingly been to determine a comparative approach resulting in an identifiable set of common concerns.

Accordingly, the book proceeds from a comparative approach to research ontologies, extending the experimental ventures of the contributors, to the hatching of artistic propositions that demonstrably overlap with academic research traditions, of epistemic claims in the making. This comparative approach relies on the notion of transposition: that is an idea of the makeshift relocation of methodological issues – research ontologies at the brink of epistemic claims – and accumulates depth from one article to the next as the reader makes her way through the volume.

However, instead of proposing a set method, the book offers a lighter touch in highlighting the role of operators between research and writing, rather entailing a duplication of practice, in moving from artistic ideas to epistemic claims. This, in the lingo of artistic research, is known as exposition. Emphasising the construct of the ‘learning theatre’ the volume provides a support structure for the contributions to book-project, in the tradition of viewing from natural history. The contributions are hands-on and concrete, while building an agenda for a broader contemporary archaeological discussion.

About the Editors
DRAGOŞ GHEORGHIU is an historical anthropologist/archaeologist (PhD) and professional visual artist (BA Arch. and BA/MA Design) whose studies focus on the process of cognition, material culture and art. He began to produce works of art-and-archaeology starting in 1980, a concept he developed into artchaeology, and worked as a land-artist to reveal prehistoric monuments in Romania, Wales, Portugal and Sardinia. His recent research deals with the problem of immersion in reconstructed contexts in Augmented and Mixed Reality. Professor Gheorghiu is on the board of the UISPP Neolithic Commission, and is a member of the European Association of Archaeologists. He is a Paul Mellon Fellow at the Centre of Advanced Studies in the Visual Arts, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

THEODOR BARTH (Dr. Philos. Social Anthropology) works as a professor of theory and writing at the Oslo National Academy of the Arts (KHiO). His fieldwork is from Sarajevo and Zagreb in the mid-nineties. At the academy he works to involve writing in artistic practice, and to develop an experience-based understanding of artistic research and practice as a field, in aspects that resemble what anthropologists understand as fieldwork. He is involved in the development of the field of artistic research, publication as making and making public. His professional background: he has worked as a scientific researcher at the Norwegian Foundation of Research in Science and Technology (SINTEF), and as a research fellow at the University of Oslo. He is currently a member of the European Association of Archaeologists.
The Hypogeum of the Aurelii A new interpretation as the collegiate tomb of professional scribae by John Bradley. Paperback; 205x290mm; xiv+192 pages; 4 tables, 136 figures (81 plates in colour). (Print RRP £38.00). 486 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 50. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690477. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690484. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Hypogeum of the Aurelii: A new interpretation as the collegiate tomb of professional scribae examines the frescoes of one of the most enigmatic funerary monuments of ancient Rome. The three chambers of the Hypogeum of the Aurelii, so-named from an mosaic inscription in one of the surviving chambers, contain a varied series of images that have long been considered an example of early Christian or Gnostic iconography. One hundred years after the monument’s discovery Dr Bradley challenges earlier theories and concludes that far from having religious significance the pictures reveal a world of professional pride among a group of what we might today call ‘white collar workers’. Although not among the rich and famous of Imperial Rome, the deceased nevertheless rose from a state of slavery to positions within the bureaucracy at the centre of an empire at its height. Although part of a strictly hierarchical, and male-dominated, society the community to which the Aurelii belonged provided an environment of comparative equality: a community that acknowledged the contribution and expertise of both women and children in their profession. The pride in their achievement is reflected in the decoration of the tomb in which they expected to spend eternity. This study, the first in modern times to examine all the extant images in detail, will be of interest, not only to historians of ancient Roman art, but also to social historians who wish to more fully understand the lives of those who helped support the running of an empire.

About the Author
JOHN W. BRADLEY was born in Birmingham in 1956. He graduated with a degree in Construction and Economics before embarking on a thirty year career in the construction industry primarily in London and the Middle East. During the 1990s he was also involved in environmental politics using his background in industry to challenge the conventional rationale behind many of today’s political and economic decisions. Changing profession in 2005 Dr Bradley gained a first-class degree and Masters in Classics at Royal Holloway College, University of London with dissertations on early Christian art and republican Roman religion. In 2011 he commenced his PhD at the same college, initially under the supervision of Professor Amanda Claridge then Dr Zena Kamash. An initial project on the broader aspects of the evolution of art in the catacombs of Rome ultimately focused on the frescoes that make up the subject of this book when existing theories and explanations appeared unsatisfactory. In addition to his interest in the art of ancient Rome his interests include classical music, military history and environmentalism. He has lived in Brentford, west London for thirty years where he shares a home and allotment with his wife Susan.
Perspectives on materiality in ancient Egypt – agency, cultural reproduction and change edited by Érika Maynart, Carolina Velloza and Rennan Lemos. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+110 pages; illustrated throughout with 8 plates in colour. 62 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919337. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919344. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Perspectives on materiality in ancient Egypt – agency, cultural reproduction and change expresses the authors’ broad theoretical interest on materiality and how it helps us to understand the crucial role of material culture in ancient Egyptian society in a more complex way. In the volume, mainly young scholars in Brazil, France, Germany and the UK approach the potential of materiality based on several case studies covering a wide range of topics such as Egyptian art, recent perspectives on sex and gender, hierarchies, and the materiality of textual sources and images.

The idea of gathering young scholars to discuss ‘materiality’ first took place in the form of a colloquium organised in São Paulo, but soon after became a more encompassing project aspiring to produce a publication. The editors’ aimed to include researchers from various places, which makes the volume a materialisation of fruitful collaborations between individuals coming from different scholarly traditions. The combination of different ways of looking at the ancient material culture can hopefully contribute to the renovation of theory and practice in Egyptology. The editors believe that the emphasis on diversity— of background histories, national traditions and mind-sets—is one the main elements that can be used to boost new perspectives in a connected, globalised and hopefully less unequal world.
The Life and Works of W.G. Collingwood A wayward compass in Lakeland by Malcolm Craig. Paperback; 148x210mm; xii+254 pages; 38 figures, 13 plates in colour. 466 2018 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918712. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918729. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The son of a watercolour artist, William Gershom Collingwood (1854-1932) studied at University College, Oxford where he met John Ruskin, whose secretary he later became and with whom he shared a wide range of interests. Collingwood travelled extensively, sketching as he went, and after studying at the Slade School of Art, moved to the Lake District where he wrote extensively about the Lakes, Icelandic sagas and Norse mythology, as well as publishing a biography on Ruskin in 1893. He was an accomplished artist, founding the Lake Artists Society in 1904 and serving as Professor of Fine Art at the University of Reading from 1905-11. His interest in art and Scandinavia prompted his research into the Pre-Norman Crosses of Cumbria and the North of England. In 1927 he published ‘Northumbrian Crosses of the Pre-Norman Age’, illustrated with his own drawings. He was also an accomplished musician, climber, swimmer and walker. His son was the noted archaeologist (a leading authority on Roman Britain), philosopher and historian R. G. Collingwood. This well researched biography provides a comprehensive account of the life and works of a nineteenth century polymath whose story should be better known.

About the Author
Malcolm Craig PhD lives with his wife Margaret in Histon, Cambridgeshire; they have a daughter, Alison and son, Andrew. He began working life as a marine engineer in the Merchant Navy, his voyages taking him to the far east and twice around the world. A keen mountaineer, between voyages he worked in the Alps of Switzerland, Italy and Austria. He became Chief Instructor at Outward Bound schools in Wales and Malaysia before moving back to engineering as a Training Manager in shipbuilding. He joined the Industrial Training Research Unit in Cambridge and completed a PhD in engineering at Cranfield Institute of Technology (now University), where he subsequently lectured, and worked as a Tutor for the Open University in Britain and Russia. He has written seven books, most with mountains as a theme, and became interested in the work of W.G. Collingwood while rock climbing as a young man in the English Lake District.
Representations of Animals on Greek and Roman Engraved Gems Meanings and interpretations by Idit Sagiv. Paperback; 175x245mm; vi+198 pages; 98 illustrations (51 plates in colour). 439 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918699. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918705. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Whereas animals are a frequent depiction on gemstones within the Greek and Roman periods, and play a key role in symbolic representations on these engraved gems, they have generally been overlooked with little in the way of focussed academic study.

In the present research, a large group of Greek and Roman gems (intaglios) bearing depictions of animals was selected. The gems are presented through a detailed study of the themes described in an attempt to form a comprehensive approach to the depictions of animals and their significance on Greek and Roman gems. The work examines the associations between animal depictions and the type of gemstone and its believed qualities. The study also discusses the changes in representation of animals on gems compared to other, larger media, and questions the significance of these changes. It is concluded here that as far as animal motifs are concerned, the gems could be accorded with a deeper symbolism, such as good luck, abundance and fertility, health, success, and victory. All these motifs are perceived as capable of weakening hostile forces. The animals engraved can also symbolise nature's abundance and fertility, especially when represented along with their offspring, pasturing and grazing, or accompanied by such fertility symbols as cornucopia, ears of corn, and wine goblets. Other animals are related to certain gods, and even comprise their attributes, and thus it was believed that the owner of an engraved gem was accorded divine protection.

About the Author
Dr. Idit Sagiv is a researcher of Classical Art. She completed her MA and PhD studies at Tel Aviv University. Her research and publications focus on Greek and Roman engraved gems. Since 2016, she is an academic member of the History of Art Department, Tel-Aviv University, where she teaches courses on Classical Art.
Composite Artefacts in the Ancient Near East Exhibiting an imaginative materiality, showing a genealogical nature edited by Silvana Di Paolo. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+96 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (19 colour plates). 424 2018 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918538. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918545. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Composite Artefacts in the Ancient Near East: Exhibiting an imaginative materiality, showing a genealogical nature examines the complex relationship between environment, materials, society and materiality with particular reference to the composite artefacts in the ancient Near East. On the one hand are the objective and natural attributes of materials, possibly exalted from their transformation: a form of fascination immanent in all kind of technical activity which promotes the transition from the ordinary into an ‘extra-ordinary’ realm, imbuing the object with new meaning. On the other hand is the idea that properties of materials are not fixed attributes of ‘matters’, but are processual as well as relational: the qualities of artefacts are subjective and are included in the worldview of artisans making them, as well as in the mind of who observes who appreciate them. Thus, the craftsmanship is oriented towards the achievement of sophisticated products through assemblage techniques and the blending of contrasting properties and qualities of materials. The term ‘composite’ is a combination of the power of technology and the ability to form new images: the strict relationship between creativity, technology and manufacture produces novel interactions and solutions.

Although the primary concern of this volume is to provide specific case studies in which theoretical assumptions and hypotheses can be applied to the ancient evidence, most of the papers take not only the general perspective, such as the relationship between materials and humans, but also a defined body of evidence – material, textual and visual through which they address the issue. This volume represents a first attempt to conceptualise the construction and use of composite artefacts: the richness of approaches, the development of new issues depending on specific case studies, and the overturning of widely accepted ideas, show the interest towards this category of objects and the opportunity to enlarge this field study in the future.

About the Editor
SILVANA DI PAOLO (PhD Rome 2001) is, since 2001, researcher at the Institute for Studies of Ancient Mediterranean of the Italian National Council of Research (CNR). She is the director of the Series Biblioteca di Antichità Cipriote, scientific board member of al-Sharq (published in Paris) and editorial board member of Rivista di Studi Fenici published by ISMA. As CNR researcher she is co-coordinator of different projects in collaboration with European and non-European foreign institutions. She is a co-director of the QANATES project in the Iranian Kurdistan. She has written extensively on the relationship between art and power, location and styles of workshops, social meaning of works of art, as well as on material culture of the 2nd millennium BC. Silvana is currently working on the concepts of similarity in assemblages of artifacts and routinisation of the artisanal production in the ANE, as well as on the applications of the shape and semantic analysis on Mesopotamian glyptics.

Commemorating Conflict: Greek Monuments of the Persian Wars by Xavier Duffy. viii+210 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 10 plates in colour. 412 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918392. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918408. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £26.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This study is concerned with how the Greek peoples, of primarily the classical period, collectively commemorated the Persian Wars. The data presented here are public monuments, which include both physical and behavioural commemorations. The aim of this work is to reveal and present the methods by which Greeks of the fifth century BC commemorated the Persian Wars. Several trends have drawn attention away from studies presenting commemorative practices in their entirety: the focus on singular monument types, individual commemorative places, a particular commemorating group or specific battle, and an overemphasis on Athenian commemorations. This project works towards rectifying this issue by highlighting the variations in commemorative traditions. This holistic approach to the data, which is inclusive in its remit of commemorative objects, places, and groups, allows for a more complete representation of the commemorative tradition. What emerges from this study is the compilation of all known ancient Greek monuments to commemorate the battles of Marathon, Salamis, Artemisium, Thermopylae and Plataea.

About the Author
XAVIER DUFFY graduated with a PhD in the commemoration of ancient Greek warfare in 2016 from the University of Birmingham’s School of Classics, Ancient History and Archaeology. Xavier has taught Classical Archaeology at the University of London and University of Winchester and has a keen interest in material culture. This interest was nurtured while working as Assistant Collections Manager at the British Museum from 2009-2017. This book is the result of Xavier’s postgraduate research on the commemorations of the Persian Wars specifically.

Table of Contents
PREFACE; 1: INTRODUCTION; 2: CONTEXTUALISING THE COMMEMORATIONS OF THE PERSIAN WARS; 3: COMMEMORATIVE GROUPS AND COMMEMORATIVE PLACES; 4: MONUMENTS BY TYPE; 5: THE MONUMENTS AND THE EVIDENCE; BIBLIOGRAPHY
Problems of Chronology in Gandhāran Art Proceedings of the First International Workshop of the Gandhāra Connections Project, University of Oxford, 23rd-24th March, 2017 edited by Wannaporn Rienjang and Peter Stewart. DOI: 10.32028/9781784918552. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+166 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (56 colour plates). 419 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918552. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918569. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Since the beginning of Gandhāran studies in the nineteenth century, chronology has been one of the most significant challenges to the understanding of Gandhāran art. Many other ancient societies, including those of Greece and Rome, have left a wealth of textual sources which have put their fundamental chronological frameworks beyond doubt. In the absence of such sources on a similar scale, even the historical eras cited on inscribed Gandhāran works of art have been hard to place. Few sculptures have such inscriptions and the majority lack any record of find-spot or even general provenance. Those known to have been found at particular sites were sometimes moved and reused in antiquity. Consequently, the provisional dates assigned to extant Gandhāran sculptures have sometimes differed by centuries, while the narrative of artistic development remains doubtful and inconsistent.

Building upon the most recent, cross-disciplinary research, debate and excavation, this volume reinforces a new consensus about the chronology of Gandhāra, bringing the history of Gandhāran art into sharper focus than ever. By considering this tradition in its wider context, alongside contemporary Indian art and subsequent developments in Central Asia, the authors also open up fresh questions and problems which a new phase of research will need to address.

Problems of Chronology in Gandhāran Art is the first publication of the Gandhāra Connections project at the University of Oxford’s Classical Art Research Centre, which has been supported by the Bagri Foundation and the Neil Kreitman Foundation. It presents the proceedings of the first of three international workshops on fundamental questions in the study of Gandhāran art, held at Oxford in March 2017.

About the Editors
WANNAPORN RIENJANG is Project Assistant of the Gandhāra Connections Project at the Classical Art Research Centre, Oxford. She completed her doctoral degree in Archaeology at the University of Cambridge on Buddhist relic cult in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Before starting her PhD, she worked as a research assistant for the Masson Project at the Department of Coins and Medals, the British Museum. Her research interests include the art and archaeology of Greater Gandhāra, Buddhist studies, and working technologies of stone containers and beads.

PETER STEWART is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. He has worked widely in the field of ancient sculpture. His publications include Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008). Much of his research concerns the relationship between Gandhāran art and Roman sculpture.

Mosaici funerari tardoantichi in Italia Repertorio e analisi by Luigi Quattrocchi. iv+ 114 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (19 plates in colour). Italian text with English summary. 400 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917999. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918002. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £20.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The potential of tomb mosaics as an academic resource has often been underestimated and consequently they have only been partially analysed not only in Italy but also throughout the Western Mediterranean. This work is intended to shed a new light on these finds, which are often incomplete, lost, or little studied.

The first part of the book presents the history of previous studies on the subject and briefly explains the structure of the corpus. The corpus, in turn, is organised according to current Italian administrative regions, specifically: Sardegna, Sicilia, Puglia, Campania, Lazio, Marche, and Friuli Venezia Giulia. Every region is then further divided following current provinces and municipalities.

This work does not aim to present merely a compilation of data in a catalogue; thus the second part of the book focuses specifically on tomb mosaics found in the Italic peninsula and major islands, and provides information on their geographic distribution, dating, typology, place of discovery and iconography, and considers the potential identification of individual workshops.

The purpose of the book is to bring tomb mosaics to greater consideration, since they have not survived in academic literature to the same extent as did their rich villa or domus counterparts. This work does not therefore aspire to be a complete analysis of the subject, but rather a starting point which can be both useful and a stimulus for future studies.

Italian Description
Il mosaico funerario è una particolare tipologia musiva spesso sottovalutata e poco studiata. Le origini sono da ricercarsi, probabilmente, nell’antica regione della Bizacena, attuale Tunisia, a partire dagli ultimi decenni del III secolo d.C. Nel IV secolo iniziò l’esportazione dei cartoni musivi funerari nel resto del Mediterraneo occidentale, raggiungendo l’Italia e la Spagna; in entrambi i casi però il mosaico funerario non riscosse particolare successo. La richiesta maggiore di questo nuovo monumento funerario avveniva da parte dei cristiani, e solo in minima parte dai pagani. In questo libro si cerca di fare ordine sui mosaici funerari presenti nell’odierno territorio italiano, catalogando tutte le evidenze musive, sia oggigiorno scomparse che ancora in situ, per cercare di delineare un’analisi sul fenomeno che ha, in maniera seppur ridotta, investito la Penisola italiana e le sue Isole maggiori. Infatti le testimonianze musive si concentrano in zone dove particolari condizioni hanno permesso la loro messa in posa. La prima parte è dedicata al repertorio dei sessanta mosaici funerari dell’attuale Italia, ognuno catalogato secondo una scheda pensata e studiata per rendere più agevole possibile la consultazione. La seconda parte è invece incentrata sullo studio d’insieme del fenomeno dei mosaici funerari in Italia, nella quale si cerca di fare chiarezza e dare dei punti fermi su questa categoria di mosaici. L’analisi conclusiva cerca di spiegare il perché in Italia, pur essendoci condizioni apparentemente favorevoli alla produzione delle coperture tombali musive, non si siano trovati che poche testimonianze musive funerarie se paragonate a quelle ritrovate nel Nord Africa e in special maniera in Bizacena.

LUIGI QUATTROCCHI (1988) ha conseguito la Laurea Triennale in Beni Culturali presso l’università degli Studi di Cagliari, ha proseguito gli studi conseguendo la Laurea Magistrale in Archeologia presso l’Università di Pisa e ha concluso gli stessi con il Dottorato presso l’Universidad Carlos III de Madrid con cotutela presso l’Università degli Studi di Sassari. Le sue linee di ricerca si incentrano sullo studio del fenomeno del mosaici funerario all’interno del bacino del Mediterraneo occidentale e sulla produzione musiva della Sardegna, Spagna e Nord Africa.
Augustus: From Republic to Empire edited by Grażyna Bąkowska-Czerner and Jarosław Bodzek. iv+164 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 397 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 36. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917807. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917814. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Augustus: From Republic to Empire is the product of a conference entitled AUGUSTUS. 23 September 63 BC – 19 August 14 AD – 2000 years of divinity organised on 12 December 2014 by the Institute of Archaeology of the Jagiellonian University, the Centre for Comparative Studies of Civilisations at the Jagiellonian University and the National Museum in Krakow. The conference was hosted by the Emeryk Hutten- Czapski Museum – a branch of the National Museum in Krakow – and commemorated the anniversary of Augustus’s death.

The volume offers readers articles that deal with a variety of topics ranging from architecture, urban issues and painting to fine art represented by glyptics and numismatics. It includes papers devoted to the publication of previously unknown objects, articles presenting iconographic research, deliberations on propaganda, and analyses of the political situation and source texts. Chronologically, some of the papers go beyond the age of August, yet are relevant to the understanding of the transformations that took place in art and architecture during the reign of the first princeps, the widely-understood middle and late periods of the Republic, and the early Empire. The geographic scope of the articles covers the entire territory of the Empire. This diverse topic allows a variety of research themes on the epoch of August to be presented from a broad perspective.
Great Waterworks in Roman Greece Aqueducts and Monumental Fountain Structures: Function in Context edited by Georgia A. Aristodemou and Theodosios P. Tassios. iv+258 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (52 colour pages). 394 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 35. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917647. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917654. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In recent years an increasing worldwide awareness of the importance of water management in the ancient civilizations has generated much new discussion on water archaeology in ancient Greece.

The present volume, Great Waterworks in Roman Greece, consists the very first presentation of large scale waterworks in the Greek provinces of the Roman Empire. As a collective work, it brings together a wide body of experts from the newly emerged and expanding field of water technology and water archaeology in Roman Greece, and it fills an essential gap in archaeological research and relative bibliography regarding water management and monumental water structures in Greece during the Roman period. Among the main goals that this multi-author volume attempts to succeed is to show that great waterworks (namely aqueducts and nymphaea) not only were novelties in the Greek provinces, both in form and function, but they also changed the architectural landscape of their surrounding environments, and they introduced the concept of luxury in the urban landscapes of Roman Greece. The discussed papers deploy along a wide geographical area, covering the roman provinces of Macedonia and Thrace, Epirus, Achaia, the Aegean islands and Crete, between the 1st century BC and the 4th century AD.

Collective studies such as this, not only will enlighten and promote the multifaceted significance of the archaeological remains regarding water management technology of the Roman period in the Greek regions, but they will also reveal the significant impact of the Roman technological heritage in the Greek territories.

About the Author:
Georgia Aristodemou is a Researcher of Roman Archaeology. She completed her MA and PhD studies at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. Her research and publications focus on monumental architecture and the sculptural display programmes deploying on the facades of theatres and nymphaea in the Eastern Provinces of the Roman Empire, along with their impact and use in the formation of social, cultural and political identities in the provinces. She served in various museum projects and excavations throughout Macedonia and Thrace, especially in the region of Kavalla and the Island of Thasos. She participated at the research project for the exploration and restoration of the ancient theatre of Philippi and she is engaged with the project of studying the sculptural decoration of the monument. Since 2009, she is an academic member of the School of Humanities of the International Hellenic University (Thessaloniki, Greece), where she teaches courses on Roman Art and Archaeology of the Black Sea and the wider Eastern Mediterranean region and she coordinates the annual International Summer School on Ancient Technology. She is the author of a book on roman nymphaea and many papers on roman sculpture and architecture. She is a member of several Greek and International archaeological Societies and Associations.

Theodosios P. Tassios, Professor Emeritus of the National Technical University of Athens is an academic, civil engineer, author and writer. He is a member of the Academy of Sciences of Torino (IT), doctor honoris causa of Liege University (BΕ), S.E. University of Nanjing (CN), Democritos University (GR), Aristotle University (GR), Cyprus University, the National & Kapodistrian University of Athens, and the Panteion Unversity (GR). His teaching and publications extend in the areas of Soil Mechanics, Bridge Design, Dams and Tunnels, Concrete Technology and Ancient Greek Technology. He has also dealt with a wide range of scientific, technological and educational issues (European and national regulations, antiseismic protection, monument protection, public works), along with subjects of Ph
Egyptian Predynastic Anthropomorphic Objects A study of their function and significance in Predynastic burial customs by Ryna Ordynat. iv+120 pages; 101 illustrations presented in colour and black & white (12 colour plates). 45 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917784. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917791. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Anthropomorphic objects from the Egyptian Predynastic have been a topic of frequent study and debate, from the time they were first excavated until today. These objects, including human figurines, hippopotamus tusks, tag amulets and combs carved with the human image, continue to fascinate and perplex scholars today. Objects such as these form part of the extensive and distinctive iconographic imagery of Predynastic Egypt, and are often interpreted solely in the context of their symbolic or iconographic significance.

The aim of this study is to examine these anthropomorphic objects in terms of their original context in order to determine what role they played in Predynastic burials – a useful method, as most of these objects are found in graves. A database comprising all provenanced anthropomorphic Predynastic objects and their placement in the grave, in addition to the details of each grave, has been composed in order to conduct a detailed analysis. The analysis is geared to answer the question of whether it is possible to determine the function of these objects from the available data, and if so, what the results could tell us about burial practices and rituals in Predynastic Egypt.

It became clear from the results that the context, especially the specific placement of the object in the grave, can reflect significantly the meaning and function of anthropomorphic objects. The placement and function seems to have depended on the type of object: for instance, figurines had different placements and meanings to tusks and tags. Ultimately, it appears that anthropomorphic objects, especially figurines, were personal items with which the deceased were identified and buried by their relations and friends. They may have served as magical or protective items, or as representations of ancestors or the deceased individuals themselves. This conclusion is significant, as it confirms the previous assumptions about the functions of anthropomorphic objects in Predynastic graves through a thorough analysis of available data, making a contribution to our understanding of Predynastic burial rituals.
Natter’s Museum Britannicum: British gem collections and collectors of the mid-eighteenth century by John Boardman, Julia Kagan and Claudia Wagner with contributions by Catherine Phillips. iv+304 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Casebound with dust jacket. 379 2017. ISBN 9781784917272. £55.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The German gem-engraver, medallist, and amateur scholar Lorenz Natter (1705- 1763), was so impressed by the size and quality of the collections of ancient and later engraved gems which he found in Britain that he proposed the publication of an extraordinarily ambitious catalogue – Museum Britannicum – which would present engravings and descriptions of the most important pieces. He made considerable progress to this end, producing several hundred drawings, but in time he decided to abandon the near completed project in the light of the apparent lack of interest shown in Britain. Only one of the intended plates in its final form ever appeared, in a catalogue which he published separately for Lord Bessborough’s collection. On Natter’s death the single copy of his magnum opus vanished mysteriously, presumed lost forever.

All hope of recovering Natter’s unpublished papers seemed vain, and their very existence had come to be doubted. Yet they were to be found more than two hundred years after his death, in Spring 1975, when the classical scholar and renowned expert in gems, Oleg Neverov, chanced upon them at the bottom of a pile of papers in the archives of the State Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg. Neverov and his colleague Julia Kagan carried out the initial research on the Hermitage manuscripts and produced the first published account of this archival treasure.

The present volume builds upon their earlier work to produce the first comprehensive publication of Museum Britannicum, offering full discussion in English and presenting Natter’s drawings and comments alongside modern information on the gems that can be identified and located through fresh research. This book is the result of a ten-year collaboration between scholars on the Beazley Archive gems research programme at Oxford’s Classical Art Research Centre and the State Hermitage Museum. It fulfills Natter’s vision for the Museum Britannicum – albeit two and a half centuries late – to the benefit of art historians, cultural historians, curators, and gem-lovers of today.
Immagini del tempo degli dei, immagini del tempo degli uomini Un’analisi delle iconografie dei mesi nei calendari figurati romani e bizantini e del loro contest storico-culturale by Ciro Parodo. viii+338 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Italian text with English summary. 376 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 30. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917340. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917357. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £42.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A characteristic shared by the Roman and Byzantine illustrated calendars is that they represent the twelve months of the year, referable to an iconographic repertoire which is divided into three themes: the astrological-astronomical, the festive-ritual and the rural-seasonal. With regard to the first type, the months are depicted through images of the signs of the zodiac, often associated with images of the guardian deities of the months; the second category includes depictions of the months that refer to some important religious festivals; finally, the third theme includes images of the months that allude to the most important work activities performed in the countryside. The figurative calendars, which in most cases are made on mosaics, are characterized by a wide distribution in terms of time, concentrated between the 3rd and 6th century, and geography, with the areas of greatest attestation consisting of Italy, Africa Proconsularis, Greece and Arabia. With regard to the architectural context, the calendars from the West are prevalently documented in the domus, while those from the East are particularly attested in ecclesiastical buildings. The aim of research presented in this volume is the in-depth study of the connections between the meaning of the iconography of the Roman and Byzantine illustrated calendars and their historical and cultural context.

About the Author:
Ciro Parodo (1978) received a Degree and a Post-Graduate Degree in Archaeology at the University of Cagliari (Italy), and a PhD in Classical Archaeology at the Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen (Germany). He focuses his research on two principal domains: the study of Greek and Roman Iconography as a means of understanding the social and cultural issues of the Classical World, and the reception of Classical Antiquity in the Modern and Contemporary Age.

Italian Description:
La caratteristica comune dei calendari figurati romani e bizantini consiste nella rappresentazione dei dodici mesi dell’anno, riferibile a un repertorio iconografico articolato in tre temi: quelli di tipo astrologico-astronomico, festivo-rituale e rurale-stagionale. Per quanto riguarda la prima tipologia, i mesi sono raffigurati mediante le immagini dei segni zodiacali, spesso associate a quelle delle divinità tutelari mensili; la seconda categoria include quelle raffigurazioni dei mesi che si riferiscono ad alcune importanti festività religiose; la terza tematica, infine, comprende quelle immagini dei mesi che alludono alle più rilevanti attività lavorative svolte in ambito campestre. I calendari figurati, realizzati nella maggioranza dei casi su mosaico, si contraddistinguono per un’ampia distribuzione in senso temporale, con una concentrazione cronologica fra il III e il VI secolo d.C., e geografico, con le aree di maggior attestazione costituite dall’Italia, l’Africa Proconsularis, la Grecia e l’Arabia. In merito invece al contesto architettonico, i calendari di provenienza occidentale sono documentati in prevalenza presso le domus, mentre per quanto concerne quelli orientali, sono attestati in particolare negli edifici ecclesiastici. L’obiettivo della ricerca presentata in questo volume si focalizza sull’approfondimento delle connessioni esistenti tra il significato dell’iconografia dei calendari figurati romani e bizantini e il loro contesto storico- culturale.

Ciro Parodo (1978) ha conseguito la Laurea e la Scuola di Specializzazione in Archeologia presso l’Università di Cagliari (Italia) e il Dottorato di Ricerca in Archeologia Classica presso l’Eberhard- Karls-Universität di Tübingen (Germania). Focalizza la sua ricerca su due ambiti principali: lo studio dell’iconografia greca e romana come strumento per analizzare le problematiche socio- culturali del mondo classico e l’indagine delle dinamiche di ricezione dell’antichità classica nell’età moderna e contemporanea.