​​ We use cookies to enhance your experience on our site. By continuing to use the site you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy & Cookies.​

 
Archaeopress logo
Archaeopress Publishing Ltd, Summertown Pavilion, 18-24 Middle Way, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7LG, England
tel +44 (0) 1865 311914 fax +44 (0) 1865 512231   email: info@archaeopress.com
Monthly AP Alert - join our mailing list today Archaeopress on Facebook Archaeopress on Twitter Archaeopress on Linked In Archaeopress Blog
Home  
|
  Browse by Subject  
|
  Browse by Series  
|
  Catalogues  
|
  Join Our Mailing List  
|
  Visit Our Blog  
|
  Login (Private Customers)  
|
  Login (Institutional Subscriptions)  
|
  View Basket

Search

title, author, ISBN, keyword

Browse for books in the following languages

ARCHAEOPRESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ACCESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ARCHAEOPRESS JOURNALS
DISTRIBUTED
PUBLISHERS
DIGITAL EDITIONS
OPEN ACCESS PLATFORM
Ordering Information
About Us
Publish With Us
Standing Orders
Trade Sales
Contact Us
Request Review Copy
NEW: Par la bêche et le stylet! Cultures et sociétés syro-mésopotamiennes Mélanges offerts à Olivier Rouault edited by Philippe Abrahami and Laura Battini. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300 pages; 139 figures; 18 tables (39 colour pages). 564 2019 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 5. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692822. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692839. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is a tribute to the career of Professor Olivier Rouault who has conducted extensive research in the fields of both Assyriology and Ancient Near Eastern archaeology. The book is composed of 25 papers written by his colleagues, friends and former students from Belgium, France, Great Britain, Italy, Israel, Japan, The Netherlands, Poland, Syria and the United States. The contributions presented here combine archaeological, iconographic and Assyriological studies from the Neolithic to the 1st millennium BC, covering whole of Mesopotamia and regions of Anatolia and the Levant. Nine papers deal with the data of Terqa, Mari and Qasr Shemamok, sites close to Professor Olivier Rouault’s main field of research. He published cuneiform tablets from Mari and Terqa and worked as a director of archaeological missions at Terqa and Qasr Shemamok. The book is divided into six main topics: Palace and Administration, Temples and Cults, Families and Societies, Literatures and Historiography, Representation and Symbolic Aspects, Cultural Markers and Stratigraphy – all the topics that attracted Professor Olivier Rouault during his fruitful career. More intimate texts recounting memories of moments shared with Olivier punctuate the reading of these contributions.

About the Editors
Philippe Abrahami is an Assyriologist, Professor of History and Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Lille, France (CNRS Laboratory HALMA UMR 8164).

Laura Battini is an archaeologist specialised in the Ancient Near East. She is currently a researcher at the French National Centre of Scientific Research (Laboratory PROCLAC, UMR 7192, directed by Thomas Römer). Laura created a new journal for the Ancient Near East (Ash sharq, Archaeopress), and is the editor of the archaeological series Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology.
NEW: Aleksei P. Okladnikov: The Great Explorer of the Past. Volume I A biography of a Soviet archaeologist (1900s - 1950s) by A. K. Konopatskii, translated by Richard L. Bland and Yaroslav V. Kuzmin. Paperback; 148x210mm; xxiv+410 pages; 30 black & white figures. (Print RRP: £24.99). 547 2019 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692044. £24.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692051. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Aleksei P. Okladnikov: The Great Explorer of the Past is about the life and works of Aleksei P. Okladnikov (1908– 1981), a prominent archaeologist who spent more than 50 years studying prehistoric sites in various parts of the Soviet Union—mainly in Siberia and Central Asia as well as in Mongolia. Okladnikov made numerous fascinating discoveries in the 1930s, including the first Neanderthal remains in the USSR at Teshik Tash (Uzbekistan) and unique figurines at the Upper Palaeolithic site of Buret’ in the Angara River basin (Eastern Siberia). His research and achievements are presented on the background of ideological campaigns inspired by the Communist Party in the 1920s–1950s, a subject that is very rarely described in non-Russian sources. Particular attention is given to the debunking of the ‘Japhetic theory’ and the ‘new doctrine of language’ developed by Nikolai Y. Marr, an Oriental scholar and specialist in languages who in the 1920s–early 1930s was a formal leader of Soviet archaeology. Marr’s principles of linguistic studies were mechanically transmitted to several fields of the humanities, including archaeology, and were mandatory for every Soviet scholar. In 1950 an abrupt end to Marr’s theories was enacted by Josef Stalin. Details of these events—important for development of archaeology, ancient history, and linguistics in the USSR—were never previously described.

The book is for archaeologists, historians, and everyone who is interested in the history of scholarship (particularly the humanities) in the twentieth century.

Contributors to this volume:
Aleksander K. Konopatskii was born in 1951 in Tambovka County, Amur Province, USSR. After graduating from Suvorov’s Military Boarding School in Ussuriisk (Maritime Province), he met Aleksei P. Okladnikov in 1969. Konopatskii became a cadet at the Novosibirsk Military-Political Academy but dropped out in 1972 and joined the Institute of History, Philology and Philosophy, Siberian Branch of the USSR Academy of Sciences. Since this time, he was closely associated with Okladnikov, assisting in fieldwork, travel and preparation of scientific reports. In 1974, Konopatskii graduated from Kemerovo State University in History (including archaeology). In the 1970s, he studied prehistoric sites on the shore of Lake Baikal in Siberia, and gained the Candidate of Sciences (PhD-equivalent) degree in 1979; in the 1980s and early 1990s, he excavated ancient sites in the lower course of the Amur River (Russian Far East). Since 1998, Konopatskii has been an Assistant Professor of the Novosibirsk General Military Academy where he teaches humanities.

Richard L. Bland studied Alaskan prehistory in the 1970s – 1990s (PhD 1996, University of Oregon). He has translated numerous books and articles on the archaeology of Northeastern Siberia and the Russian Far East, helping to bring the rich Soviet/Russian records of prehistory and early history to the international scholarly community.

Yaroslav V. Kuzmin has been studying geoarchaeology of the Russian Far East, Siberia and neighbouring Northeast Asia since 1979 (PhD 1991; DSc. 2007). He has also assisted in translating and editing books on the archaeology of eastern Russia.
NEW: ARAMAZD: Armenian Journal of Near Eastern Studies Volume XIII.1-2 2019 edited by Aram Kosyan (Editor in Chief). Paperback; 165x235mm; 2 printed issues. 13 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 1829-1376-13-2018. £50.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £70.00 (No VAT). £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £79.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Volume XII presented in two print issues (order here to receive both issues) - Issue 1 is available now, Issue 2 will follow in Autumn/Winter. The digital journal is presented in one volume and will be updated when printed issues are published.
FORTHCOMING: Why Did Ancient States Collapse? The Dysfunctional State by Malcolm Levitt. Paperback; 203x276mm;56 pages; 4 tables, 1 diagram (black & white throughout). 93 2019. ISBN 9781789693027. Book contents pageBuy Now

Ancient states were rooted in agriculture, sedentism and population growth. They were fragile and prone to collapse, but there is no consensus on the causes or meaning of collapse, and there is an ongoing debate about the importance, nature and even existence of state-wide collapse.

Explanations of collapse in terms of the competing mono-causal factors are found inferior to those incorporating dynamic, interactive systems. It is proposed that collapse should be explained as failure to fulfil the ancient state’s core functions: assurance of food supplies, defence against external attack, maintenance of internal peace, imposition of its will throughout its territory, enforcement of state-wide laws, and promotion of an ideology to legitimise the political and social status quo.

To fulfil these functions certain necessary conditions must be met. The legitimacy of the political and social status quo, including the distribution of political power and wealth, needs to be accepted; the state should be able to extract sufficient resources to fulfil its functions such as defence; it must be able to enforce its decisions; the ruling elite should share a common purpose and actions; the society needs to reflect a shared spirit (asibaya) and purpose across elites and commoners who believe it is worthy of defence.

Weaknesses and failure to meet any condition can interact to exacerbate the situation: maladministration, corruption and elite preoccupation with self-aggrandisement can induce fiscal weakness, reduced military budgets and further invasion; it can induce neglect of key infrastructures (especially water management). Inequality, a commonly neglected factor despite ancient texts, can erode asibaya and legitimacy and alienate commoners from the defence of the state.

These themes are explored in relation to the Egyptian Old Kingdom, Mycenae, the Western Roman Empire (WRE), and the Maya. They all exhibit, to varying degrees, weaknesses in meeting the above conditions necessary for stability.

About the Author
Malcolm Levitt held posts as lecturer in economics at Liverpool and Hallsworth Fellow at Manchester University (where his interest in state collapse originated) before joining HM Treasury where he became Senior Economic Adviser. He then moved to the OECD and later served as Chef de Division in the European Commission.

Since completing his MA in Archaeology at the UCL Institute of Archaeology in 2018 he has concentrated on deepening the theoretical basis of his dissertation on why ancient states collapsed.
NEW: Journeys Erased by Time: The Rediscovered Footprints of Travellers in Egypt and the Near East edited by Neil Cooke. Paperback; 160x230mm; xvi+350 pages; Illustrated throughout (89 colour pages). 557 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692402. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692419. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Members of the Association for the Study of Travel in Egypt and the Near East (ASTENE), founded in 1997, continue to research, hold international conferences, and publish books and essays in order to reveal the lives, journeys and achievements of these less well-known men and women who have made such a contribution to the present day historical and geographical knowledge of this region of the world and who have also given us a better understanding of its different peoples, languages and religions.

The men and women from the past who are written about in this volume are a mixture of the incredibly rich or the very poor, and yet they have one thing in common, the bravery to tackle an adventure into the unknown without the certainty they would ever return home to their families. Some took up the challenge as part of their job or to create a new business, one person travelled to learn how to create and manage a harem at his house in London, others had no choice because as captives in a military campaign they were forced to make journeys into Ottoman controlled lands not knowing exactly where they were, yet every day they were looking for an opportunity to escape and return to their homes, while hoping the next person they met would guide them towards the safest route.

Apart from being brave, many of these men and women travellers have something else in common: they and others they encountered have left a collective record describing their travels and their observations about all manner of things. It is these forgotten pioneers who first gathered the facts and details that now fill numerous modern guidebooks, inflight magazines and websites.
NEW: Ash-Sharq - Bulletin of the Ancient Near East Vol 3 No 1-2 2019 Archaeological, Historical and Societal Studies edited by Laura Battini (editor-in-chief). Paperback; 175x245mm; ii+120 pages; illustrated throughout (28 pages in colour). 3 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692006. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692013. £10.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £68.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Please note printed issues 1-2 are despatched as two individual volumes. Upon completion the digital journal is presented in one volume containing both issues (digital file currently contains only Vol 3 No 1; Vol 3 No 2 expected in Autumn 2019).

Note for institutional subscribers: Please be sure to log in first via your institution's unique URL - this page will then display download options. Otherwise only purchase options will display. If you experience difficulties logging in please consult your librarian or contact Archaeopress directly via the following email: info@archaeopress.com

NEW: Archéologie de la Bible hébraïque Culture scribale et Yahwismes by Christophe Lemardelé. Paperback; 175x245mm; iv+116 pages; 2 colour plates. 553 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692280. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692297. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £29.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Since the Renaissance, the question of how the Bible was written has been much debated. Documentary theory of the end of the 19th century identified "authors" and schools of writing, paving the way so that, a century later, a complex reality emerged, that of scribes modifying texts as they copied them. Thus, “The Bible” no longer appears as a controlled theological and historiographical project but as the empirical arrangement of heterogeneous texts linked together by an evolving religious ideology. While the great overall account of the first books is based on the election and migration of an entire people, the ideological foundations of Yahwism evoke rather a foreign god who, having reached Israelite territory, ultimately gained pre-eminence there.

This monotheistic ideology was above all an exclusivism that was to be reinforced from the time of the kings of Israel and Judah to the Judean revolts against Rome in the first centuries of our era. In our attempt to understand the nature and origin, as well as the evolution, of this specific form of monotheism, which made of a jealous god the only God, we have relied predominantly on the concept of the “two yahwisms”. This theory enables us to understand how a god allied with a people has also been a creative god of the universe and of all humanity.

Après la formidable avancée que fut la théorie documentaire à la fin du xixe siècle, identifiant des « auteurs » et des écoles de rédaction, un siècle plus tard, la théorie a laissé de plus en plus la place à un réel complexe, celui des scribes modifiant les textes à mesure qu’ils les copiaient. « La Bible » n’apparaît plus alors comme étant un projet théologique et historiographique maîtrisé mais comme l’agencement empirique de textes hétérogènes reliés entre eux par une idéologie religieuse évolutive. Si le grand récit d’ensemble des premiers livres se construit sur l’élection et la migration d’un peuple en son entier, les fondements idéologiques du yahwisme font plutôt état d’un dieu étranger qui serait parvenu jusqu’en terre israélite pour, à terme, s’y imposer.

Cette idéologie monothéiste fut surtout un exclusivisme qui se renforça de l’époque des rois d’Israël et de Juda jusqu’aux révoltes judéennes contre Rome aux premiers siècles de notre ère. Pour tenter de saisir la nature et l’origine, ainsi que l’évolution, de cette forme spécifique de monothéisme, qui a fait d’un dieu jaloux le seul Dieu, nous nous sommes appuyé avant tout sur le concept des « deux yahwismes ». Cette théorie permet en effet de comprendre comment un dieu faisant alliance avec un peuple en particulier a pu être également un dieu créateur de l’univers et de l’humanité entière.

About the Author
Christophe Lemardelé has a PhD in religious sciences (2007) and the title of “Élève titulaire de l’École biblique et archéologique française à Jerusalem” (2002-2003). He has directed seminars at the École Pratique des Hautes Études in Paris, from 2011 to 2016, and published Les cheveux du Nazir in 2016, as well as numerous articles in philology, exegesis and the history of religions.

Docteur en Sciences religieuses (2007), élève titulaire de l’École biblique et archéologique française à Jérusalem (2002-2003), l’auteur a été chargé de conférences à l’École pratique des hautes études à Paris, de 2011 à 2016, et a notamment publié Les cheveux du Nazir en 2016, ainsi que de nombreux articles philologiques, d’exégèse et d’histoire des religions. Docteur en Sciences religieuses (2007), élève titulaire de l’École biblique et archéologique française à Jérusalem (2002-2003), l’auteur a été chargé de conférences à l’École pratique des hautes études à Paris, de 2011 à 2016, et a notamment publié Les cheveux du Nazir en 2016, ainsi que de nombreux articles philologiques, d’exégèse et d’histoire des religions.
NEW: Ceramics in Transition: Production and Exchange of Late Byzantine-Early Islamic Pottery in Southern Transjordan and the Negev by Elisabeth Holmqvist. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+196 pages; 61 figures, 4 tables + illustrated appendices (25 pages in colour). (Print RRP £35.00). 552 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692242. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692259. Book contents pageDownload

Ceramics in Transition focuses on the utilitarian ceramic traditions during the socio-political transition from the late Byzantine into the early Islamic Umayyad and ‘Abbasid periods, c. 6th–9th centuries CE in southern Transjordan and the Negev. These regions belonged to the Byzantine province of Palaestina Tertia, before Islamic administrative reorganisation in the mid-7th century. Cooking ware and ceramic containers were investigated from five archaeological sites representing different socio-economic contexts, the Jabal Harûn monastery, the village of Khirbet edh-Dharih, the port city of ‘Aqaba/Aila, the town of Elusa in the Negev, and the suburban farmstead of Abu Matar. The ceramics were typo-chronologically categorised and subjected to geochemical and micro-structural characterisation via X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (ED-XRF) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS) to geochemically ‘fingerprint’ the sampled ceramics and to identify production clusters, manufacturing techniques, ceramic distribution patterns, and material links between rural-urban communities as well as religious-secular communities. The ceramic data demonstrate economic wealth continuing into the early Islamic periods in the southern regions, ceramic exchange systems, specialized manufacture and inter-regional, long-distance ceramic transport. The potters who operated in the southern areas in the formative stages of the Islamic period reformulated their craft to follow new influences diffusing from the Islamic centres in the north.

About the Author
ELISABETH HOLMQVIST holds a PhD (2010) in Archaeological Science from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, and MA and BA degrees in Archaeology from the University of Helsinki. She works as a post-doctoral researcher at the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki, Finland. Her research interests are broadly in archaeological science, ancient craft technologies and identifying mobility of objects and people in archaeological data. She carries out archaeological fieldwork in Finland, Israel and Jordan.
NEW: The Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Text and Archaeology by Justin L. Kelley. Paperback; 175x245mm; 47 figures, 1 table (Black & white throughout). (Print RRP £48.00). 489 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690569. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690576. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, was built by the Byzantine emperor Constantine I to commemorate the Passion of Jesus Christ. Encased within its walls are the archaeological remains of a small piece of ancient Jerusalem ranging in date from the 8th century BC through the 16th century AD, at which time the Turkish Ottoman Empire ushered Jerusalem into the modern period. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre was the subject of extensive archaeological investigation between 1960 and 1981 during its restoration. With the development of non-destructive techniques of archaeological research, investigation within the church has continued, which led to the restoration and conservation of the shrine built over the Tomb of Jesus in 2017. The first part of this monograph focuses on the archaeological record of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, surveying past excavations as well as recent research carried out within the church over the past three decades. The archaeological survey provides historical context for the second part of the book—a collection of primary sources pertinent to the history of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The texts included here range in date from the 1st century AD to the mid-19th century and are presented in their original languages with English translation.

About the Author
JUSTIN L. KELLEY teaches classes in Christian history and biblical studies at Life Pacific College. Justin specializes in the history and culture of the ancient Near East and spent several years as a student in Israel, where he studied biblical historical geography and archaeology at Jerusalem University College and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
NEW: ‘Isaac went out to the field’: Studies in Archaeology and Ancient Cultures in Honor of Isaac Gilead edited by Haim Goldfus, Mayer I. Gruber, Shamir Yona and Peter Fabian. Paperback; 205x290mm; xvi+402 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 6 colour plates. English text with Hebrew abstracts. 546 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918293. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918309. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

‘Isaac went out to the field (Genesis 24:63)’ is a collection of 28 articles by 47 authors from research institutions in Israel and around the world honoring Professor Isaac Gilead on the occasion of his 71st birthday. The authors include the honoree’s mentors, colleagues, and students. Most of the articles deal with archaeological subjects, especially prehistoric and proto-historic archaeology, which are the focus of the honoree’s teaching and research. Reflecting the broad horizons of Gilead’s interests, the volume also includes studies in other subjects including the Bible and the ancient Near East, Second Temple literature, the history of biblical exegesis, and the influence of the Bible on contemporary Hebrew Literature.

About the editors HAIM GOLDFUS teaches classical archaeology in the Department of Bible, Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. His main fields of interest and research are related to early Roman and Late Antique/ early Byzantine archaeology.

MAYER I. GRUBER is Professor Emeritus and Past Chair of the Department of Bible Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Beer Sheva. His publications include Aspects of Nonverbal Communication in the Ancient Near East (2 vols.; Rome: Biblical Institute Press, 1980); The Motherhood of God and Other Studies (Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1992); Women in the Biblical World: A Study Guide (American Theological Library Association, Bibliography Series, no. 38; Lanham, MD, and London: Scarecrow Press, 1995); Rashi’s Commentary on Psalms (Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2004); Women in Ancient Israel and Studies in Early Jewish Civilization, translated from English into Chinese by Shuqing Zhang (Beijing: China Social Sciences Press, 2009); The Women of Israel by Grace Aguilar with a New Introduction and Commentary (Piscataway, NJ: Gorgias Press 2011, 2013); and Hosea: A Textual Commentary (London: Bloomsbury T & T Clark, 2017).

SHAMIR YONA is Associate Professor in the Department of Bible, Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. He served for two terms as Chair of that department and two terms as Head of the Bible and Ancient Near Eastern Studies Division in that department. He is Co-chair with Elad Filler of the Judaica Section for Society of Biblical Literature International Meetings. He is a member of the board of directors of the New Israel Society for Biblical Research. Yona’s publications focus on the poetics of Ancient Near Eastern literature; the wisdom literature of the Bible, the ancient Near East, and rabbinic literature; biblical prophecy and narrative; Ugaritic language and literature; and Semitic lexicography.

PETER FABIAN completed his studies at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in 2005 with a PhD dissertation concerning the Roman army camp in Oboda-Avedat. After working for many years in the Israel Antiquities Authority as a senior archaeologist and an advisor, he was given a tenure track position as a classical archaeologist in the Department of Bible, Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, where he is currently a Senior Lecturer. Dr. Fabian combines his interests and expert knowledge and long track-record of fieldwork in Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine and Early Islamic archaeology, together with excavations and studies concerning the protohistory of the Southern Levant, particularly the Chalcolithic period of the Negev and the Shephela lowlands of Israel.
NEW: Over the Mountains and Far Away: Studies in Near Eastern history and archaeology presented to Mirjo Salvini on the occasion of his 80th birthday edited by Pavel S. Avetisyan, Roberto Dan and Yervand H. Grekyan. Paperback; 205x290mm; xviii+572 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (135 plates in colour). 545 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919436. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919443. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £80.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The publication of Over the Mountains and Far Away: Studies in Near Eastern history and archaeology presented to Mirjo Salvini on the occasion of his 80th birthday was initiated by the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia, the International Association of Mediterranean and Oriental Studies (Rome, Italy) and the Association for Near Eastern and Caucasian Studies (Yerevan, Armenia) as a tribute to the career of Professor Mirjo Salvini on the occasion his 80th birthday. It is composed of 62 papers written by his colleagues and students from Italy, Germany, France, Spain, Poland, the Netherlands, Denmark, Austria, Great Britain, Russian Federation, Israel, Turkey, Islamic Republic of Iran, Georgia, United States and Armenia. The contributions presented here cover numerous topics, a wide geographical area and a long chronological period. However, most of the contributions deal with research in the fields of Urartian and Hittite Studies, the topics that attracted Prof. Salvini during his long and fruitful career most.

About the editors
PAVEL AVETISYAN is a leading archaeologist from Republic of Armenia. Area of his research is Old World archaeology, particularly Neolithic to Iron Age cultures of Armenia and Transcaucasia, problems of their periodisation and chronology. P. Avetisyan led various excavation projects in Armenia (Talin, Agarak, Karashamb, Godedzor, Masis Blur, and others). He received his PhD in 2003 (‘Periodisation and Chronology of the Middle Bronze Age of Armenia’) and Dr Habil. in 2014 (‘Armenian Highland during the 24-9th Centuries BC: The Dynamics of Socio-Cultural Transformations, according to Archaeological Data’). Prof. Avetisyan is currently Director of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences, Republic of Armenia and Professor at the Yerevan State University. Publications include three monographs and more than 100 articles devoted to the mentioned problems.

ROBERTO DAN is a member of ISMEO – International Association of Mediterranean and Oriental Studies. He is an archaeologist specialised in architecture, history and landscape archaeology of the Near East, focused on the 1st millennium BC (Urartu, Achaemenid Empire). He obtained his PhD from the ‘Sapienza’ University of Rome, with a thesis on the archaeological landscape of Urartu. Roberto has conducted fieldwork in Armenia, Georgia, Turkey and Iran. He is director of the ISMEO – Archaeological Mission to South Caucasus (AMSC), a project co-financed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation of the Italian Republic, which involves archaeological activities in Armenia (Kotayk Survey Project since 2013; Vayots Dzor Project since 2015) and Georgia (Samtskhe-Javakheti Project since 2017), with excavations in the Urartian sites of Solak 1 and Yelpin 1. In 2015, he published a book devoted to the analysis of historical and architectural relations between Urartu and the Achaemenid Empire.

YERVAND GREKYAN is a leading researcher at the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia and Associate Professor at the Armenian State Pedagogical University. He received his PhD in 2002 (‘History of the Mannean Kingdom’) and defended his habilitation thesis on the structure of the Urartian Kingdom at the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia in 2016 (‘Biainili-Urartu. State and Society’).Y. Grekyan is the author of more than 70 articles and book chapters devoted to the ancient history and culture of the Near East and especially of the Armenian Highland in the Late Bronze and Iron Ages. He is a founding member of the Association for Near Eastern and Caucasian Studies and vice-editor of Aramazd: Armenian Journal of Near Eastern Studies.
NEW: Tanbûr Long-Necked Lutes along the Silk Road and beyond by Hans de Zeeuw. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+186 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 528 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691696. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691702. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Tanbûr Long-Necked Lutes Along the Silk Road and beyond explores the origin, history, construction, and playing techniques of tanbûrs, a musical instrument widely used over vast territories and over many centuries. The diffusion of the tanbûr into the musical cultures along the Silk Road resulted in a variety of tanbûrs with two or more, occasionally doubled or tripled courses, a varying number and variously tuned frets, each having its own characteristic sound, playing technique, and repertory. Since the last century, tanbûrs spread beyond the Silk Road while new versions continue to appear due to changing musical and tonal demands made on them. Similar or identical instruments are also known by other names, such as saz or bağlama, dotâr or dutâr, setâr, dömbra, and dambura.

About the Author
HANS DE ZEEUW began to take bağlama lessons and became interested in its long and fascinating history while working at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and studying at the Open University. This led him to decide to break off his studies and focus, for many years, on research into the Turkish bağlama under the supervision of Dr L.J. Plenckers of the Department of Musicology of the University of Amsterdam and Dr Okan Murat Öztürk of the Devlet Konservatuvarı of the Başkent Üniversitesi in Ankara. In 2009 he published De Turkse Langhalsluit of bağlama (Turkish Long-Necked Lute or Bağlama) with the support of the Dutch Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds. His lecture to the Uluslararası Müzik Kongresi in Istanbul in 2006 was published in Türkiyede Müzik Kültürü in 2011. A short article about the Ottoman tanbûr, The Ottoman Tanbûr: Introducing the Long-Necked Lute of Ottoman Classical Music, followed in 2018 in Expedition, a magazine of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthroplogy. He is planning an in-depth study about the Ottoman tanbûr for the near future.
NEW: Glass and Glass Production in the Near East during the Iron Age Evidence from objects, texts and chemical analysis by Katharina Schmidt. Paperback; viii+316 pages; 85 figures, 28 tables, 68 plates (approx. 92 pages in colour). 520 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691542. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691559. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Glass and Glass Production in the Near East during the Iron Age: Evidence from objects, texts and chemical analysis examines the history of glass in Iron Age Mesopotamia and neighbouring regions (1000–539 BCE). This is the first monograph to cover this region and period comprehensively and in detail and thus fills a significant gap in glass research. It focusses on identification of the different types of glass objects and their respective manufacturing techniques from the the Iron Age period. Both glass as material and individual glass objects are investigated to answer questions such as as how raw glass (primary production) and glass objects (secondary production) were manufactured, how both these industries were organised, and how widespread glass objects were in Mesopotamian society in the Iron Age period. Such a comprehensive picture of glass and its production in the Iron Age can only be achieved by setting archaeological data in relation to cuneiform texts, archaeometric analyses and experimental-archaeological investigations. With regard to the different disciplines incorporated into this study, an attempt was made to view them together and to establish connections between these areas.

About the Author
KATHARINA SCHMIDT obtained MA in Near Eastern Archaeology at Ludwig-Maximilians- Universität of Munich in 2012, with a dissertation on glazed Neo-Assyrian vessels from Upper Mesopotamia. In 2013 she started her PhD as a member of the Graduate School ‘Distant Worlds’ at the same university. As a visiting researcher, she studied at University College, London, and acquired additional knowledge in the use of chemical analyses – in particular with regard to glass. In 2016 she completed her PhD at Munich with a dissertation on glass and glassmaking in the Iron Age period. As an archaeologist she worked on excavations in Syria (Tell Halaf) and Turkey (Sirkeli Höyük, Dülük Baba Tepesi). Since 2016 she has been director of the German Protestant Institute of Archaeology in Amman, Jordan, where she carries out various research and excavation projects, above all the excavations at Tall Zirā´a.
NEW: Greco-Roman Cities at the Crossroads of Cultures: The 20th Anniversary of Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission Marina el-Alamein edited by Grażyna Bąkowska-Czerner and Rafał Czerner. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+312 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (128 colour plates). 513 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691481. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691498. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The ancient town, discovered at the site of today’s Marina el-Alamein, located on the northern coast of Egypt, developed from the 2nd century BC to the 6th century AD, finding itself at the crossroads of several civilisations: Hellenic, later replaced by Roman, and eventually Christian – and always strongly influenced by Egyptian tradition. A variety of cultures have met and appeared, their prominence flourishing and faltering at different times, but they have always co-existed and influenced one another. The syncretism prevailing here is notable in art, architecture, religion and worship.

In 2015, it had been thirty years since the discovery of the remains of the ancient city, which, for many centuries, had been unknown to the world. They were found unexpectedly during the preparatory work for the construction of a modern tourist settlement on the Mediterranean coast, and the significance and extraordinary value of the find was immediately recognised. Now the ancient city, and the historic remains of its buildings, are gradually coming to light.

The Jubilee was twofold, since 2015 marked also the 20th anniversary of the setting up of the Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission, Marina el-Alamein. During this time, architectural and archaeological research has been carried out at the site, many discoveries have been made, numerous relics of historic building structures have been preserved, and conservation methods have been improved. In the jubilee year, we invited researchers who work on archaeological sites and towns with a similar history and position in the ancient world, art and culture, to take part in a scientific discussion and exchange of experience. The authors of the presented papers are representatives of different disciplines and research methodologies: archaeologists, architects, Egyptologists, specialists in religious studies, historians and conservators. The present volume contains an interdisciplinary review of both the newest and long-term studies and achievements made in various regions of the ancient world.

Greco-Roman Cities at the Crossroads of Cultures: The 20th Anniversary of Polish- Egyptian Conservation Mission Marina el-Alamein presents papers ranging from ancient Mauritania, through Africa, Egypt, Cyprus, Palestine, Syria, as well as sites in Crimea and Georgia. The topography of cities, architecture of public buildings, as well as houses and their décor – architectural, sculptured and painted – are presented. Religious syncretism and the importance of ancient texts are discussed. Studies on pottery are also presented. The volume includes studies on the conservation of architecture, sculpture and painting. Several articles are devoted to the study of Marina el-Alamein; others talk about ancient Alexandria, Deir el- Bahari, Hermopolis Magna, Bakchias, Pelusium, Kom Wasit, Berenike, Ptolemais, Apollonia, Palmyra, Nea Paphos, as well as Chersonesus Taurica and Apsarus.

About the Editors
GRAŻYNA BĄKOWSKA-CZERNER (PhD) is Assistant Professor at the Centre of Comparative Studies of Civilisations of the Jagiellonian University. She specialises in archaeology of the Greco-Roman period in Egypt. Since 2001 she has been working as a permanent member of the Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission at the archaeological site Marina el-Alamein (Egypt), and since 2004 she has been a member of the Italian Archaeological Mission at Jebel Barkal (Sudan). Greco- Roman art, in particular iconography, are her main areas of interest. She is also involved in the study of ancient gems, as well as the iconography of decorated meroitic pottery.

RAFAŁ CZERNER (Professor) is the head of the Department of History of Architecture, Arts and Technology at the Faculty of Architecture, Wrocław University of Science and Technology (Poland) and the director of the Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission at the archaeological site Marina el-Alamein (Eg
NEW: Understanding Lithic Recycling at the Late Lower Palaeolithic Qesem Cave, Israel A functional and chemical investigation of small flakes by Flavia Venditti. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+188 pages; 11 tables, 113 figures (86 plates in colour). 509 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691016. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691023. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Flakes, and small flakes in particular, are usually seen as by-products or debris of the knapping process, rather than as desired end-products with a specific potential use. In recent years, this particular category of small tools has attracted increasing interest among researchers, especially when focusing on technological aspects in Lower Palaeolithic contexts, while the functional role of these tools is still poorly investigated.

Understanding Lithic Recycling at the Late Lower Palaeolithic Qesem Cave, Israel: A functional and chemical investigation of small flakes examines Late Lower Palaeolithic Qesem Cave, Israel, where a particular lithic trajectory directed towards the production of small flakes by means of recycling and exploiting old discarded flakes as cores has been recognised. The high density of this production throughout the stratigraphic sequence of the cave demonstrates that this was a conscious and planned technological choice aimed at providing small and sharp items to meet specific functional behaviours, and that this lithic behaviour persisted for some 200 kyr of human use of the cave. The exceptional conservation of use-wear signs and residues has made it possible to reconstruct the functional role of this specific production system, highlighting its specialised nature mostly related to the processing of the animal carcasses through accurate and careful actions and in a very specific way. The application of functional analysis based on the determination of wear on artefacts by means of optical light microscope, scanning electron microscopy and chemical analysis (FTIR and EDX), provides a useful and effective approach for understanding the adaptive strategies of the Qesem Cave hominins while facing various situations and solving different needs.

About the Author
FLAVIA VENDITTI is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Tel Aviv, Israel. She specialises in the functional analysis of quartz and flint lithic tool production and has a particular interest in Palaeolithic assemblages. During her MA studies, she started working in the field of use-wear analysis under the supervision of Professor Cristina Lemorini at University of Rome ‘La Sapienza’. She focused her research on the use-wear study of a quartz assemblage form the Middle Palaeolithic site of Coudouolous in Quercy (France). Subsequently, she attended a two-years Masters class in Archaeological Heritage at University of Rome ‘La Sapienza’ and completed her dissertation on the effects of the mechanical postdepositional alteration on quartz artifacts coming from Neolithic sites of the Sai Island (Sudan). Flavia completed her doctorate in 2017 with a research project on the functional analysis of the products of recycling from the Lower Palaeolithic Qesem Cave site in the Levant. She is a member of the Qesem Cave team project taking part in the annual archaeological excavations on the site.
Stone Tools in the Ancient Near East and Egypt Ground stone tools, rock-cut installations and stone vessels from Prehistory to Late Antiquity edited by Andrea Squitieri and David Eitam. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+360 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (89 plates in colour). 511 2019 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 4. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690606. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690613. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Stone Tools in the Ancient Near East and Egypt: Ground stone tools, rock-cut installations and stone vessels from Prehistory to Late Antiquity is about groundstone tools, stone vessels, and devices carved into rock throughout the Near East and Egypt from Prehistory to the late periods. These categories of objects have too often been overlooked by archaeologists, despite their frequent occurrence in the archaeological record. Most importantly, a careful study of these tools reveals crucial insights into ancient societies. From the procuring of raw materials to patterns of use and discard, they provide us with a wealth of information about the activities they were involved in and how these activities were organised. These tools reveal patterns in the trade of both raw materials and finished products, inform us about economic aspects of food production and consumption, cast light on industrial activities, help establish intercultural connections, and offer hints about the relationship between sites and their environment. The aim of this book is to explore all aspects of these ubiquitous tools and to stimulate debate about the new methodologies needed to approach this material.

About the Editors
ANDREA SQUITIERI is a post-doctoral researcher working for the Peshdar Plain Project, based at Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich, focussing on the study of the eastern border of the Neo-Assyrian Empire. He obtained his PhD at University College London (UCL) in 2015 with a thesis titled Stone Vessels in the Near East during the Iron Age and the Persian Period, published with Archaeopress. He is also the co-author, with Mark Altaweel, of Revolutionising a World: From Small States to Universalism in the Pre-Islamic Near East, published by UCL Press.

DAVID EITAM is an archaeologist focussing on the study of stone tools and their implications for prehistory and the history of the ancient Near East. His investigations have revealed the Iron Age period oil industry in the Kingdoms of Israel and Philistine Ekron, and the first systematic production of bread by the Natufians 12,500 years ago. He obtained his PhD at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem (HUJ) with a dissertation on Late Epipaleolithic rock-cut installations and ground stones in the Southern Levant, partly published on PLoS ONE 10(7): e0133306.
Taymāʾ I: Archaeological Exploration, Palaeoenvironment, Cultural Contacts edited by Arnulf Hausleiter, Ricardo Eichmann, Muhammad al-Najem. Hardback; 210x297mm; xii+268 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (66 plates in colour). 499 2018 Taymāʾ: Multidisciplinary Series on the Results of the Saudi-German Archaeological Project 1. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690439. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690446. Book contents pageDownload

Archaeological investigations in the north-western part of the Arabian Peninsula has increased during the last 15 years. One of the major sites in the region is the ancient oasis of Taymāʾ, known as a commercial hub on the so-called Incense Road connecting South Arabia with the Eastern Mediterranean. In the context of this new research a multidisciplinary project by the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) and the Orient Department of the German Archaeological Institute (DAI) has been investigating the archaeology and ancient environment of Taymāʾ since 2004. A major aim of this project was the development of new perspectives of the site and the region, characterised by elaborating the local socio-cultural and economic contexts. So far, Taymāʾ has been known mainly through exogenous sources.

The present volume is the first of the publication series of the Saudi-German archaeological project and focuses on three fundamental aspects of research at Taymāʾ: the current archaeological exploration of the oasis is contextualised with previous and ongoing research within the region, while at the same time offering a first overview of the settlement history of the site, which may have started as early as more than 6000 years ago. New information on the palaeoenvironment has been provided by multiproxy- analysis of sediments from a palaeolake immediately north of the settlement. The results indicate an Early Holocene humid period in the region that is shorter than the so-called African Humid Period. The abrupt aridification at around 8 ka BP, known from other regions in the Near East, is also attested in north-western Arabia. The reconstruction of the past vegetation of the site and its surroundings demonstrates that oasis cultivation at Taymāʾ started during the 5th millennium BCE with grapes and figs, rather than with the date palm. According to hydrological investigations on water resources, groundwater aquifers provided the main source of local water supply. These were exploited through wells, some of which have been identified in the area of the ancient oasis. Finally, since the time of early travellers to Northwest Arabia evidence of cultural contacts has been observed in the records from the site, which had been occupied by the last Babylonian king, Nabonidus (556–539 BCE) for ten years. A historical-archaeological essay on Egypt and Arabia as well as a study on the ambiguous relationship between Assyria and Arabia – characterised by conflict and commerce – shed new light on the foreign relations of ancient Taymāʾ.

About the Editors
ARNULF HAUSLEITER is researcher at the DAI’s Orient Department for the Taymāʾ project, funded by the German Research foundation (DFG). He has been field director of the excavations at Taymāʾ since 2004 and has co-directed the project with Ricardo Eichmann.

RICARDO EICHMANN is director of the Orient Department at the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin. He is the head of the German component of the Taymāʾ project and has co-directed it with Arnulf Hausleiter.

MUHAMMAD AL-NAJEM is head of the Antiquities Office of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) and director of the Museum of Archaeology and Ethnography at Taymāʾ, Province of Tabuk, Saudi Arabia.
The Politics of the Past: The Representation of the Ancient Empires by Iran’s Modern States by Maryam Dezhamkhooy, Leila Papoli-Yazdi. Illustrations by Ali Roustaeeyanfard. Paperback; 175x245mm; viii+148 pages; 15 figures, 1 table (8 plates in colour). 503 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690934. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690941. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Politics of the past: The Representation of the Ancient Empires by Iran’s Modern States examines the highly problematic politics of the past surrounding the archaeology of ancient empires in Iran. Being indigenous, the authors regard the relations between archaeological remains, (negative) heritage, and modern strategies of suppression. The chapters provide a detailed analysis of how the practice of archaeology could be biased and ideologically charged. Discussing their own personal and professional experiences, the authors exemplify the real (ethical) dilemmas that archaeologists confront in the Middle East, calling for reflectivity and awareness among the archaeologists of the region. The text is accompanied by visual deconstruction of ancient rock reliefs to indicate the possibility of alternative histories.

About the Authors
MARYAM DEZHAMKHOOY is Alexander von Humboldt alumna. She was assistant professor in archaeology at University of Birjand. She is a historical archaeologist with broad interest in theory. Since 2003 she has concentrated on the ‘archaeology of recent past’ with emphasis on political archaeology as the main theme, including conflicts, colonialism, gender, nationalism, etc. Maryam published mostly in scholarly anthropological and archaeological journals such as Archaeologies, International Journal of Historical Archaeology, World Archaeology, and Sexuality & Culture as well as chapters in edited volumes. She is a member of Gap End, a working group for Iranian-engaged archaeologists. Interested in gender and sexuality, she is also a member of AGE, Archaeology and Gender in Europe. Her work on gender in Sasanian Iran can be considered as pioneering in Iran. Her last publication, with Leila Papoli-Yazdi, was a monograph on gender, in Persian.

LEILA PAPOLI-YAZDI is Alexander von Humboldt alumna. In 2010, due to political issues, Leila was suspended of her post as assistant professor in archaeology at University of Neyshabour. She is an archaeologist of recent past. Starting in 2003 she has concentrated on disaster archaeology of Bam, a city located in southeastern Iran which was dramatically damaged by an earthquake. Afterwards she directed several projects in Pakistan, Kuwait and Iran. The main themes of all of her projects are oppression, gender, colonialism, nationalism, etc. Her work on political opposition and nationalism from an archaeological viewpoint can considered as pioneering in Iran. Leila published mostly in scholarly anthropological and archaeological journals such as World Archaeology, Archaeologies and International Journal of Historical Archaeology and also as well as chapters in edited volumes or as monographs in Persian. She is a member of Gap End, a working group for Iranian-engaged archaeologists. She is also a member of AGE, Archaeology and Gender in Europe. She is the co-author of a monograph on gender and hegemony in Persian.
Popular Religion and Ritual in Prehistoric and Ancient Greece and the Eastern Mediterranean edited by Giorgos Vavouranakis, Konstantinos Kopanias and Chrysanthos Kanellopoulos. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+170 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (30 plates in colour). 481 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690453. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690460. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume features a group of select peer-reviewed papers by an international group of authors, both younger and senior academics and researchers. It has its origins in a conference held at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, which aimed to bring up the frequently-neglected popular cult and other ritual practices in prehistoric and ancient Greece and the eastern Mediterranean. The topics covered by the chapters of the volume include the interplay between elite and popular ritual at cemeteries and peak sanctuaries just before and right after the establishment of the first palaces in Minoan Crete; the use of conical cups in Minoan ritual; the wide sharing of religious and other metaphysical beliefs as expressed in the wall-paintings of Akrotiri on the island of Thera; the significance of open-air sanctuaries, figurines and other informal cult and ritual paraphernalia in the Aegean, Cyprus and the Levant from the late bronze age to the archaic period; the role of figurines and caves in popular cult in the classical period; the practice of cursing in ancient Athens; and the popular element of sports games in ancient Greece.

About the Editors

GIORGOS VAVOURANAKIS is Assistant Professor in Prehistoric Aegean: Theoretical Archaeology at the Department of History and Archaeology of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. He studied at the same university and did his MA and PhD at the University of Sheffield. He has worked as a contract archaeologist for the Hellenic Ministry of Culture, as a post-doctoral researcher at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens and as adjunct faculty at the Universities of Crete and the Peloponnese, and the Hellenic Open University. His research interests include archaeological theory, especially landscape archaeology and funerary archaeology, but also the history of archaeological research. He has directed field projects in Cyprus and Crete and is currently the deputy director of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens excavation at Marathon.

KONSTANTINOS KOPANIAS is Assistant Professor of Ancient Civilizations of the Eastern Mediterranean at the Department of History and Archaeology of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. He studied at the same university and also at the Paris-Lodron University of Salzburg and the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen. He has worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Athens, as adjunct faculty at the University of Crete and as Allgemeiner Referent at the German Archaeological Institute in Athens. Since 2011 he has been the director of the University of Athens excavaton in Tell Nader and Tell Baqrta in the Kurdistan Region in Iraq.

CHRYSANTHOS KANELLOPOULOS is an archaeologist specializing in classical architecture. He is Assistant Professor at the Department of History and Archaeology of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. He was employed for a number of years as a historical architect at the American Center of Oriental Research in Amman, Jordan, where he worked on the buildings of both Amman and Petra. His PhD thesis treated the classical and Hellenistic phases of ancient Karthaia on the island of Kea. He is the author of Amman: The Great Temple (Amman 1996) and the Late Roman Temenos Wall at Epidauros (Athens 1999), co-author of the Petra Church (Amman 2001), The Thymele at Epidauros (Fargo 2017) and The North Ridge in Petra (Amman 2018). During recent years, Dr Kanellopoulos’ work has focussed on the architecture of the Library of Hadrian in Athens and of the temple of Zeus Basileus in Levadeia.

Reviews

'The topic of the conference and of this volume is a welcome one in the field of Greek religion. Its greatest strength is the centering of under-published bodies of material from ritual contexts, such as figurines, and the emphasis on the importance of their contextualization within ritual p
Rural Cult Centres in the Hauran: Part of the broader network of the Near East (100 BC – AD 300) by Francesca Mazzilli. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+208 pages; 43 figures, 3 maps, 5 tables (3 plates in colour). (Print RRP £32.00). 464 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 51. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919542. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919559. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Rural Cult Centres in the Hauran: Part of the broader network of the Near East (100 BC–AD 300) challenges earlier scholars’ emphasis on the role played by local identities and Romanisation in religion and religious architecture in the Roman Empire through the first comprehensive multidisciplinary analysis of rural cult centres in the Hauran (southern Syria) from the pre-Roman to the Roman period. The Hauran is an interesting and revealing area of study because it has been a geographical cross-point between different cultures over time. Inspired by recent theories on interconnectivity and globalisation, the monograph argues that cult centres, and the Hauran itself, are part of a human network at a macro level on the basis of analysis of archaeological, architectural, sculptural and epigraphic evidence and landscape. As a result of this multi-disciplinary approach, the text also re-assesses the social meaning of these sanctuaries, discusses the identity of the elite group that contributed financially to the building of sanctuaries, and attempts to reconstruct ritual and economic activities in cult centres. This book re-evaluates the significance of contacts between the elite of the Hauran and other cultures of the Near East in shaping cult sites; it includes a first catalogue of rural cult centres of the Hauran in the appendix.

About the Author
FRANCESCA MAZZILLI is a Roman pottery specialist at the Cambridge Archaeological Unit, University of Cambridge (since March 2015). She holds a PhD in Archaeology at the University of Durham for her thesis Beyond Religion: Cultural Exchange and Economy in Syria. Over the last ten years she has worked as an archaeologist in England, Italy and Jordan. Her main research interests are Roman religion, architecture, landscape, theory and pottery. She has presented papers covering these topics in various international conferences in Europe. Together with Dies Van Der Linde she is currently co-editing a book entitled Dialectics of Religion in the Roman World. She has been a member of the Theoretical Roman Archaeological Conference (TRAC) standing committee and of the Theoretical Roman Archaeological Journal (TRAJ) editorial team since March 2017.
Household Food Storage in Ancient Israel and Judah by Tim Frank. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+182 pages; 99 figures, 29 tables (40 plates in colour). 463 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919801. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919818. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This study serves as a source book on domestic food storage in Ancient Israel and Judah by outlining important ethnographic and ancient textual and pictorial sources relevant to the discussion. These allow us to understand the motivated actions in relation to food storage, and the significance of food storage in daily life. On the basis of twenty-two well-excavated buildings from thirteen Iron Age sites, representative archaeological data is examined. For each house the total preserved food storage capacity is calculated, activity areas are identified, and specific patterns are noted. Food storage equipment, the location and role of food storage in the household, and the integration with other activities are analysed.

Storage rooms were often located at the margins of houses, but a considerable part of the stored food was kept in other activity areas toward the centre. The data indicates that in Iron Age I food was stored mainly domestically or in shared community facilities, while redistributive food storage became more common in Iron Age II, with significant domestic storage continuing. The ideal of self-sufficiency remained.

About the Author
TIM FRANK is a staff member of the Lahav Research Project, Phase IV archaeological excavations at Tell Halif (Israel). He studied Theology (Biblical Studies) at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, and Applied Anthropology (Near Eastern Archaeology) at Mississippi State University, completing his doctorate at the University of Bern, Switzerland. He specializes in household archaeology, particularly that of Ancient Judah. More broadly, he investigates aspects of daily life in Ancient Israel and Judah.
ARAMAZD: Armenian Journal of Near Eastern Studies Volume XII.1-2 2018. Paperback; 165x235mm; 204 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (57 plates in colour). 12 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 1829-1376-12-2018. £45.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £70.00 (No VAT). £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now


Volume XII presented in two print issues (order here to receive both issues). The digital journal is presented in one volume containing both issues.

Note for institutional subscribers: Please be sure to log in first via your institution's unique URL - this page will then display download options. Otherwise only purchase options will display. If you experience difficulties logging in please consult your librarian or contact Archaeopress directly via the following email: info@archaeopress.com

Ash-Sharq - Bulletin of the Ancient Near East Vol 2 No 1-2 2018 Archaeological, Historical and Societal Studies edited by Laura Battini (editor-in-chief). 2 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 2513-8529-2-2018. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 2514-1732-2-2018. £10.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Please note printed issues 1-2 are despatched as two individual volumes. The digital journal is presented in one volume containing both issues.

Note for institutional subscribers: Please be sure to log in first via your institution's unique URL - this page will then display download options. Otherwise only purchase options will display. If you experience difficulties logging in please consult your librarian or contact Archaeopress directly via the following email: info@archaeopress.com

KOINON: The International Journal of Classical Numismatic Studies Volume 1, 2018 Inaugural Issue edited by Nicholas J. Molinari (General Editor); Shawn Caza, Lloyd W.H. Taylor (Associate Editors). Paperback; 220x280mm; vi+152 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (45 plates in colour). 1 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690293. £35.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690309. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

As the name indicates, KOINON is a journal that encourages contributions to the study of classical numismatics from a wide variety of perspectives. The journal will include papers concerning iconography, die studies, provenance research, forgery analysis, translations of excerpts from antiquarian works, specialized bibliographies, corpora of rare varieties and types, ethical questions on laws and collecting, book reviews, and more. The editorial advisory board is made up of members from all over the world, with a broad range of expertise covering virtually all the major categories of classical numismatics from archaic Greek coinage to late Medieval coinage.

Table of contents for the inaugural issue:
Why a New Journal in Classical Numismatics? An Editorial by Nicholas J. Molinari

GREEK NUMISMATICS
Sophocles’ Trachiniae and the Apotheosis of Herakles: The Importance of Acheloios and Some Numismatic Confirmations – by Nicholas J. Molinari
Provenance Lost and Found: Alfred Bourguignon – by John Voukelatos
A Philip III Tetradrachm Die Pair Recycled by Seleukos I – by Lloyd W.H. Taylor
Blundered Era Date on Coin of Arados, Civic Year 119 – by Martin Rowe

ROMAN NUMISMATICS
Sotto l’egida di Minerva: Echi monetali delle imprese britanniche da Cesare ai Severi – by Luigi Pedroni
A Doubted Variety of M. Aemilius Scaurus and P. Plautius Hypsaeus Vindicated – by Jordan Montgomery and Richard Schaefer
Redating Nepotian’s Usurpation and the Coinage of Magnentius – by Shawn Caza
A previously unrecorded reverse for Constantine I – by Victor Clark

ORIENTAL NUMISMATICS
The Dating and the Sequence of the Persid Frataraka Revisited – by Wilhelm Müseler
The Kilwa Coins of Sultan al-Ḥasan ibn Sulaymān in their Historical Context – by N.J.C. Smith
An Introduction to Parthian Silver Fractions, The Little Anomalies of Arsacid Coinage – by Bob Langnas
An interesting denaro tornese of the Barons Revolt of 1459-1464 and some considerations regarding Nicola II di Monforte – by Andrei Bontas

A CATALOG OF NEW VARIETIES
Sur les chemins d’Onagre: Histoire et archéologie orientales Hommage à Monik Kervran edited by Claire Hardy-Guilbert, Hélène Renel, Axelle Rougeulle et Eric Vallet. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+244 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (39 plates in colour). French text with English abstracts. 500 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919849. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919856. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A pioneer of the French Islamic archaeology in the Middle East, Monik Kervran (CNRS, lab The Orient & The Mediterranean) was first renowned for her excavations at Susa in Iran and the discovery of the Darius’ statue at the start of her career in 1972. She then directed in the 70’s and 80’s excavations on the Arabian coasts of the Persian Gulf and Sea of Oman, at the main pre-Islamic and Islamic maritime centers of Qal’at al-Bahrain and Sohar. She also led researches in Central Asia and Eastern Iran, excavating Nishapur, and, since the 90’s, in the Indus delta where she opened excavations at Sehwan Sharif and Banbhore.

Through the nineteen international contributions of this volume, the editors and contributors wish to highlight the variety of Monik Kervran’s scientific interests. In this way, they express their admiration and gratitude for her many achievements, in the archaeology, history, architecture, iconography and material culture of the Middle East and Western Indian Ocean during the late pre-Islamic and Islamic periods.

Pionnière de l’archéologie islamique française au Moyen-Orient, Monik Kervran (Cnrs, laboratoire Orient & Méditerranée) s’est illustrée dès le début de sa carrière par ses fouilles à Suse en Iran et la découverte de la statue de Darius en 1972. Elle a dirigé dans les années 70 et 80 la fouille d’importants sites portuaires de la côte arabe du golfe Persique et de la mer d’Oman, à Qal’at al-Bahrain et Sohar. Elle a également mené des recherches en Asie centrale et en Iran oriental, notamment à Nishapour, puis, depuis les années 90, dans le delta de l’Indus où elle a ouvert des fouilles à Sehwan Sharif et Banbhore.

A travers les dix-neuf contributions internationales présentées dans cet ouvrage, les éditeurs et les contributeurs ont désiré mettre en lumière la diversité des intérêts scientifiques de Monik Kervran. Ils souhaitent ainsi exprimer leur admiration et leur gratitude pour ses apports majeurs aux champs de l’archéologie, de l’histoire, de l’architecture, de l’iconographie et de la culture matérielle du Moyen-Orient et de l’océan Indien occidental aux périodes pré-islamique tardive et islamique.

CLAIRE HARDY-GUILBERT est ancien chercheur du Cnrs (laboratoire Orient & Méditerranée), docteur de l’Université de la Sorbonne en archéologie et histoire de l’art islamiques, auteur de soixante-dix articles et ouvrages. Elle fit et dirigea des fouilles sur de nombreux sites islamiques ou médiévaux (Belyunech-Maroc, Sabra Mansuriya-Tunisie, Suse-Iran, Huwailah et Murwab-Qatar, Julfar-Ras al-Khaimah, Banten Girand-Java, al-Shihr-Yemen, Marsalukk-Libye) et étudia aussi des architectures traditionnelles islamiques encore en élévation à Bahrain et au Qatar. Elle fut membre du Comité national du Cnrs (1986-1991) dans la Section 44, Langues et Civilisations Orientales, et membre de la Commission consultative des fouilles archéologiques du Ministère des Affaires Etrangères (1996-2005). Elle fait partie du comité de Direction du Bulletin Critique des Annales Islamologiques publié à l’Ifao, au Caire.

HELENE RENEL est ingénieur d’études au Cnrs au sein du laboratoire Orient & Méditerranée. Elle co-dirige deux bases de données portant, l’une sur l’architecture du monde musulman (Mashreq-Maghreb), l’autre sur les ports et le commerce en Méditerranée et océan Indien (Apim). Céramologue, elle a étudié le matériel provenant de fouilles archéologiques en Syrie, aux Emirats Arabes Unis, au Kenya et à Mayotte. Elle est actuellement responsable de l’étude du matériel céramique du port médiéval de Qalhât (Oman).

AXELLE ROUGEULLE (Cnrs - laboratoire Orient & Méditerranée) est archéologue de la période islamique, spécialisée dans l’histoire des échanges au Moyen-Orient médiéval, et plus particulièrement dans l’océan Indien. Elle a travaillé en Iran et à Bahrain sous la direction de Monik Kervran, et a mené des prospections et des fouilles sur les routes terrestres
Naturvorstellungen im Altertum Schilderungen und Darstellungen von Natur im Alten Orient und in der griechischen Antike edited by Florian Schimpf, Dominik Berrens, Katharina Hillenbrand, Tim Brandes and Carrie Schidlo. ii+285 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (56 colour plates). German text. 411 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918255. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918262. Book contents pageDownload

Everyone who investigates pre-modern concepts of nature cannot avoid a critical reflection on the ancient understandings of it. Here, “nature” is understood in the sense of a seemingly untouched space, largely independent of human culture. While this concept of “nature” is prevalent in modern times, the reconstruction of ancient ideas is difficult in that concepts of nature, if at all present, emphasize other aspects. For example, the Greek term φύσις in pre-Hellenistic times defines the nature of a thing rather than an untouched environment. A word for “nature” in this sense has not been handed down to us in the remaining texts of the Ancient Near East and Classical Antiquity. Nevertheless, such concepts can certainly be reconstructed from descriptions of nature to be found in literature and the representations of natural elements in art.

The present volume aims at identifying these concepts of nature in texts as well as in archaeological remains of the Ancient Near Eastern and the Greek culture from the Archaic to the Hellenistic period. Contributions from the fields of archaeology and philology are juxtaposed for each time period in chronological order. This arrangement provides a good overview of the concepts of nature prevailing throughout different period and cultures.

GERMAN DESCRIPTION: Der Begriff „Natur“ wird in modernen, mitteleuropäischen Gesellschaften meist im Sinne eines vermeintlich unberührten Raumes verstanden, der weitgehend unbeeinflusst von menschlicher Kultur ist. Für vormoderne Kulturen lassen sich solche Vorstellungen bzw. Konzepte sehr viel schwieriger nachweisen, da beispielsweise ein Wort für „Natur“ mit der eben genannten Bedeutung in den erhaltenen Texten des Alten Orients und der griechischen Antike so nicht überliefert zu sein scheint. Gleichwohl werden durchaus Naturelemente in der antiken Literatur, der Flächenkunst sowie in antiken Monumenten beschrieben bzw. abgebildet sowie als integrative Bestandteile genutzt und funktionalisiert. Daraus lassen sich Konzepte von „Natur“ herausarbeiten und rekonstruieren. Der vorliegende Band möchte solche „Naturkonzepte“ in Texten, Artefakten und Denkmälern des Alten Orients und des griechischen Kulturraumes von der Archaik bis in den Hellenismus identifizieren und einen Überblick über die jeweils in einem bestimmten Zeit- und Kulturraum vorherrschenden Vorstellungen sowie deren diachrone Entwicklung geben.

About the Editors
FLORIAN SCHIMPF studied Classical Archaeology and History at the universities of Frankfurt and Istanbul, whilst gaining practical experiences by participating in excavations in Priene (Turkey), Portugal and on the Balkans. In 2013 he joined the Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature” at the University of Mainz with a project on natural sanctuaries in ancient Greece and Asia Minor. His research interests lie in the fields of religious history, Greek cult practices and metrology.

DOMINIK BERRENS studied Classical Philology and Biology at the University of Freiburg. From 2013-2017 he was part of the Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature” at the University of Mainz, where he received his doctorate with a dissertation on social insects in antiquity in 2016. Since October 2017 he has been a postdoctoral researcher working on the project “NOSCEMUS – Nova Scientia: Early Modern Science and Latin” funded by the European Research Council at the University of Innsbruck. His research interests lie in pre-modern scientific texts and ancient drama.

KATHARINA HILLENBRAND studied Classical Philology and German Studies at the Universities of Würzburg and Frankfurt. In 2014 she joined the Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature” at the University of Mainz with a project on concepts of volcanic phenomena in Roman antiquity. Currently she is working at the department of Classical Philology at the University o
The Palace Lady’s Summerhouse and other inside stories from a vanishing Turkey by Patricia Daunt. Hardback with Dust Jacket; 210x260mm; 304 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. 5 2017. ISBN 9780995756601. £25.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

From Istanbul's palatial old embassies to its glorious Bosphorus summerhouses, from Ottoman Paris to Ankara's Art Deco, from rainforest mansions to a mad mosque in the mountains... a diplomat's wife reveals their secret histories. This book brings together essays by Patricia Daunt written over the past 25 years for Cornucopia Magazine. It concludes with her latest article, on the magnificent ruins of Aphrodisias, newly listed as a World Heritage Site but long one of her greatest loves. The images are by internationally renowned photographers, including Fritz von der Schulenburg, Simon Upton, Cemal Emden and Jean-Marie del Moral. Foreword by John Julius Norwich.

About the Author
Patricia Daunt is a writer, married to a former ambassador to Turkey, Sir Timothy Daunt; they first met when both were stationed at the British Embassy in Ankara in 1960. Over the past sixty years she has travelled widely in Turkey, often on horse or foot, acquiring a deep knowledge of its history and civilizations. She has introduced parties of enthusiasts to Turkey's archaeological and architectural treasures, as well as its indigenous plants and trees. But her abiding interest remains the ancient city of Aphrodisias. Since 1993, she has been chairman of the Friends of Aphrodisias Trust, a British charity that supports archaeological projects at the site, in the southwest of Turkey.

Reviews
".a record of her expertise and enthusiasms, whose coffee-table dimensions belie its scholarly contents."--Yasmine Seale (Times Literary Supplement) (03/01/2018)

"[This is] much more than a beautifully illustrated book: it's about the people who lived - and live - in these buildings... a love letter to a country and to a world that has been almost completely swallowed up by tourism, new money and development.""--Owen Matthews (The Spectator) (12/01/2017)

Table of Contents
Foreword

PALACES OF DIPLOMACY
1 The Winter Palaces The Pera Embassies

WINDOW ON THE BOSPHORUS
2 Boating with Billy
3 The Summer Palaces: The Bosphorus Embassies
4 The Jewel Box: The Çürüksulu Mehmet Pasha Yalı
5 The Vizier’s Retreat: The Kıbrıslı Yalı
6 A Room for the Books: Ahmed Vefik Pasha’s Library
7 Water’s Edge: The Hekimbaşı Yalı
8 The Talk of the Bosphorus: The Zeki Pasha Yalı
9 Some Enchanted Evenings: The Ratip Efendi Yalı
10 The House that Came out of the Blue: The Germen Yalı
11 In the Spirit’s Wake: Sumahan on the Water
12 The Palace Lady’s Summerhouse: The Ethem Pertev Yalı

TRAVELS IN ANATOLIA
13 The Country Houses that Ride the Storm
14 The Lake that Time Forgot
15 Sublime Portals The Great Mosque and Hospital of Divriği

SECRET ANKARA
16 A Brave New World The Embassies’ Big Move to Ankara
17 Fly in the Face of Fashion Ankara’s Hidden Assets

PARIS A LA TURQUE
18 Treasures of a Lost Dynasty
19 From Lunacy to Diplomacy 276

APHRODISIAS REBORN
20 City of Aphrodite

Acknowledgements and glossary
Index
Winifred Lamb: Aegean Prehistorian and Museum Curator by David W. J. Gill. Paperback; 148x210mm; vi+276 pages. 448 2018 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918798. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918804. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Buy Now

Winifred Lamb was a pioneering archaeologist in Anatolia and the Aegean. She studied classics at Newnham College, Cambridge, and subsequently served in naval intelligence alongside J. D. Beazley during the final stages of the First World War. As war drew to a close, Sydney Cockerell, Director of the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, invited Lamb to be the honorary keeper of Greek antiquities. Over the next 40 years she created a prehistoric gallery, marking the university’s contribution to excavations in the Aegean, and developed the museum’s holdings of classical bronzes and Athenian figure-decorated pottery. Lamb formed a parallel career excavating in the Aegean. She was admitted as a student of the British School at Athens and served as assistant director on the Mycenae excavations under Alan Wace and Carl Blegen. After further work at Sparta and on prehistoric mounds in Macedonia, Lamb identified and excavated a major Bronze Age site at Thermi on Lesbos. She conducted a brief excavation on Chios before directing a significant project at Kusura in Turkey. She was recruited for the Turkish language section of the BBC during the Second World War, and after the cessation of hostilities took an active part in the creation of the British Institute of Archaeology at Ankara. a.

About the Author
David Gill is Professor of Archaeological Heritage at the University of Suffolk and Visiting Research Fellow in the School of History at the University of East Anglia. He is a former Rome Scholar at the British School at Rome, and Sir James Knott Fellow at Newcastle University. He was responsible for the Greek and Roman collections at the Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge, before moving to Swansea University where he was Reader in Mediterranean Archaeology. In 2012 he received the Outstanding Public Service Award from the Archaeological Institute of America for his research on cultural property.

Table of Contents (Provisional)
Introduction
Chapter 1 - The Lamb Family and Early Years
Chapter 2 - Cambridge and Classics
Chapter 3 - The Hope Vases and Naval Intelligence
Chapter 4 - The First Year in Athens (1920–21)
Chapter 5 - Prehistory and the Fitzwilliam Museum
Chapter 6 - Mycenae, Sparta and Macedonia
Chapter 7 - The Fitzwilliam Museum: Developing the Classical Collections
Chapter 8 - The Eastern Aegean: Lesbos and Chios
Chapter 9 - Anatolia and Kusura
Chapter 10 - The War Years
Chapter 11 - The British Institute of Archaeology at Ankara
Bibliography
Index
The Geography of Trade: Landscapes of competition and long-distance contacts in Mesopotamia and Anatolia in the Old Assyrian Colony Period by Alessio Palmisano. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+192 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 442 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919252. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919269. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

From the mid-20th century onwards, consolidated study of the merchant archives from the Old Assyrian trading colony at Kaneš (Kültepe) has not only transformed our understanding of the social, economic and political dynamics of the Bronze Age Near East, but also overturned many preconceived notions of what constitutes pre-modern trade. Despite this disciplinary impact and archaeological investigations at Kültepe and elsewhere, our understanding of this phenomenon has remained largely text-based and therefore of limited analytical scope, both spatially and contextually. This book re-assesses the Old-Assyrian trade network in Upper Mesopotamia and Central Anatolia during the Middle Bronze Age (c. 1970 – 1700 BC) by combining in some analytical detail the archaeology (e.g. material culture, settlement data, etc.) of the region both on its own terms and via a range of spatial approaches. The author offers a comparative and spatial perspective on exchange networks and economic strategies, continuity and discontinuity of specific trade circuits and routes, and the evolution of political landscapes throughout the Near East in the Middle Bronze Age.

About the Author
ALESSIO PALMISANO is a Post-Doctoral Research Associate at UCL Institute of Archaeology and is currently working on a research project examining the relationship between inferred regional demographic trends in the Mediterranean since the appearance of farming and reconstructed land cover in the past. His research so far has been primarily focused on the study of Western Asian and Eastern Mediterranean early complex societies, the analysis of settlement patterns, and the development of bespoke quantitative and computational methods to Archaeology. He also took part, with roles of scientific responsibility, in several campaigns of archaeological fieldwork, primarily in Iraq, Italy, Syria, and Turkey.
Stamboul Ghosts: A Stroll Through Bohemian Istanbul by John Freely; Introduction by Andrew Finkel; Postscript by Maureen Freely; Illustrations by Ara Güler. Hardback; 165x225mm; 144 pages; 38 illustrations. 4 2018. ISBN 9780956594884. £16.95 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Irish-American physicist, academic and traveller John Freely wrote more than sixty lively books on travel, history and science before he died in 2017, aged 90. But It was Istanbul, where he emigrated with his family in 1960 to take up a post teaching physics at the American Robert College, that turned him into a writer. His first book, 'Strolling Through Istanbul' – written with his fellow academic Hilary Sumner-Boyd – was an instant success when it was published in 1972 and has never been out of print since.

With the exception of Oğuz, so thin that he was known as The Ghost because he barely cast a shadow, everyone in John Freely's rumbustious memoir, including the author himself, is larger than life. Bohemian Istanbul was a haven for myriad misfits who found their feet in the city. Clamorous, glamorous, eccentric, cosmopolitan and frequently outrageous, they included the 'berserker' Peter Pfeiffer, a resourceful exile with three passports; Aliye Berger, the beautiful queen of bohemian Pera; the writer James Baldwin and, fleetingly, the future Pope John XXIII.

This elegy for a lost world encapsulates the flavour of their daily life and nightly excesses. Well lubricated with lemon vodka and Hill Cocktails served by Sumner-Boyd's gloomy housekeeper, 'Monik Depressive', the Freely crowd weave their way from the Galatasaray fish market and the taverns of Çiçek Pasajı to the Russian restaurant Rejans, and frequently on to the Freely household on the Bosphorus hills, where a party will soon be in full swing and eggnog flowing freely. Stamboul Ghosts is lllustrated with Ara Guler's poignant black-and-white photographs, which make of Freely's beloved city an evocative stage-set.

About the contributors to this volume
Born in Brooklyn, New York, of Irish parents, John Freely (1926–2017) was brought up in New York City and Inch on the Dingle Peninsula in the west of Ireland. A lifelong traveller, he had crossed the Atlantic four times by the time he was six. He enlisted in the US Navy at seventeen in 1944, serving on missions in Burma, India and China, and married Dolores (“Toots”) Stanley after being demobbed in 1947. He received a doctorate in nuclear physics from New York University and did post-doctoral work at All Souls College, Oxford. He moved to Istanbul with his family to take up a teaching post at the American Robert College in 1960 and remained there for most of the rest of his life. Physicist, teacher, and author of more than sixty books of travel, history and science, most famously the seminal guidebook 'Strolling Through Istanbul' (1972), he was a noted raconteur as well as writer, with a prodigious memory for poetry and song as well as facts and dates. He continued writing to the very end of his life: among his last books are three volumes of memoirs, The Art of Exile: A Vagabond Life (2016), The House of Memory: Reflections on Youth and War (2017), and the newly published Stamboul Ghosts (2018).

The author of the foreword to John Freely's Stamboul Ghosts, Andrew Finkel has been based in Turkey since 1989, as correspondent for print and broadcast media including The Times, The Economist, TIME, CNN and the Latitude section of The New York Times. More unusually, he has worked in Turkish-language media – in newsrooms, as a featured columnist and on television. His articles and editorials have appeared in The Washington Post, The Guardian, The Observer and Financial Times, and he has broadcast for the BBC. Finkel is a founder and executive of Platform24 (P24), a Turkish-registered NGO intended to strengthen the integrity of independent media. He was a Journalism Fellow at the University of Michigan and is the author of schola